Two Bored Apes - NFT Podcast

Episode 3 - You Say Qatar, I Say Qatar

August 24, 2021 Two Bored Apes
Two Bored Apes - NFT Podcast
Episode 3 - You Say Qatar, I Say Qatar
Show Notes Transcript

On Episode 3 of Two Bored Apes, Jaime and Roy talk about the latest news regarding the Bored Ape Yacht Club. They discuss the "Chicken Derby" project that had its final drop this week, the Marvel Comic drop on Ve-Ve, and, of course, also talk about Art Blocks - specifically the recent drops "Scribbled Boundaries" by William Tan, "phase" by Loren Bednar, and "Alien Insects" by Shvembldr.

Show Notes

Abstract of the day
https://opensea.io/collection/abstract-of-the-day

Letters from a Zeneca
https://zeneca33.substack.com/

The Blocks of Art
https://artblocks.io/project/74/gallery

Scribbled Boundaries
https://artblocks.io/project/131/gallery

Phase
https://artblocks.io/project/143/gallery

Chicken Derby
https://bitlovin.com/

VeVe Marvel Drop
https://medium.com/veve-collectibles/marvel-digital-comics-6d4a77713ea8


Roy:

On today's episode of Two Bored Apes, we, of course talk about ArtBlocks. We talked about what's been happening with the Bored Ape Yatch Club this week, we talked about the chicken Derby and the drop that they had given update to the pudgy penguins. We discussed some random things. And we may or may not argue over the pronunciation of some words.

Intro:

Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh

Jamie:

Welcome to episode three of Two Bored Apes. I'm your host, Jamie. I'm here with my friend Roy Roy, how are you doing?

Roy:

I'm doing excellent. How are you doing?

Jamie:

I'm doing quite well as well. What what are you so excellent about?

Roy:

Well, it's a good Saturday night, NFTS pumping artblocks are pumping, bored apes are pumping. It's good. And life is good in NFT land.

Jamie:

And you you own these things. So you feel good about their prices going up? Is that Is that true?

Roy:

Yes, that is accurate. I mean, I'm also I just feel good. Because as I said that I would last week, I've sort of taken this week off and a bit like Cruzi in terms of minting and being as hectic in the NFT space. And so maybe a bit more relaxed. And it's just nice to see the things that I earned going up.

Jamie:

Yeah, I mean, there's only a finite amount of ether we all have. And at some point, you kind of get fully invested in it. And your only options are, figure out what to sell. So you can buy more stuff or just kind of be happy with what you own. And then just kind of let the market decide what they're worth. And it seems like you're getting closer to that second thing lately.

Roy:

Yeah, I think so. It's sort of like an ongoing battle. In the NFT space. I think everyone struggles with it or goes through it, where it's, it's this liquidity crunch, where you see these opportunities, and you're like, Oh, I really want to get that I should get that that's going to go up. That's a really good buy. And as you said, we're all limited an eighth pretty much no one has almost no one has, you know, just

Jamie:

really Vincent van dough has an unlimited amount, right? It does

Roy:

seem like that. It seems like there are more people who seem like they have unlimited eth entering the space as well. And just Yeah, wishes. Bags. Yeah.

Jamie:

There was a slight pause that I said, I'm gonna just keep it going and let Roy jump into the breach and I saw you. Let's keep this

Roy:

in. And let's just

Jamie:

this is very professional. Let's talk about artblocks. Okay, we started talking about our Plex, let's keep talking about artblocks. We can talk about the market going crazy, which you sort of alluded to, or a couple of these recent drops Woody, what do you want to get into first,

Roy:

let's talk about the two drops will the to look to have the drops that happen this last week, and then we can touch on the whole market.

Jamie:

Alright, let's start with alien insects because that is something that you are much more acquainted with. Oh, I'm not even gonna try to say that artist's name. I love that that would have been a good one for us to disagree about. Yeah, I've only ever just sort of glossed it over. I've never even tried to pronounce it in my brain. But let's let's hear you, sir.

Roy:

All right, I'm gonna. The oddest in my mind is shamble the, it's yeah, it's got a lot of consonants, and not many vowels in the name. So it's like, s HVEMB. LD LDR.

Jamie:

Do we know their real name? Or do we only have a handle for them?

Roy:

Um, it might be somewhere on the blog site, or

Jamie:

apologies to them, if that is their real name, and I'm being very sensitive culturally. Yeah.

Roy:

It seems like it might not be the real name. Because a lot of the artists who have their real name have first and last name listed in like the desert.

Jamie:

It doesn't seem like a real name to me. But so let's let's talk about their whole ecosystem. This is something you've been in super early, I guess it started with their curated drop the blocks of art, which I remember ahead of time, you were super excited about you thought it looked great. I was less excited about it didn't think it looked as great. So I think I ended up minting zero and you got a bunch of them. And it has worked out spectacularly for you. But talk about what that artist has done with their pieces and the collection and stuff.

Roy:

Yeah, so it's really interesting, the sort of ecosystem and universe that that they've built. So the first curated drop was called the blocks of art. And it was this like meta drop. Obviously, artblocks is the platform name. And the piece of art itself was a collection of blocks essentially interconnected with an each individual block had like a little piece of on it. And some of them are animated and moving around

Jamie:

a lot, I would say, sort of multiple, right? Because each face of it, yeah.

Roy:

You know, it was a cube. And yeah, it's we'll post a link in the show notes, you can go check it out. That's probably the easiest way rather than me trying to describe it. But essentially, the drop looked really cool. I was excited for it. He dropped the 500 back, I think it was three or four months ago now, when op Lux was sort of in a bit of a bear market and not really pumping anywhere close to what it is right now. So I mentored. I think,

Jamie:

by the way, that is such an understatement. Yeah. The I mean, the difference in in how the market treats. So many of these projects on artblocks, when we got into where it is now is just absolutely insane. And it was not that long ago, it really wasn't like any sort of non NFT timeline.

Roy:

Yeah. So yeah, back to the drop. He, he dropped it, it sold out. I mean, I don't think it was like a crazy rush and sold out in maybe 20 minutes, which back then was decently quick, but some of them were still selling out much quicker. And the secondary market didn't really explode or anything. I mean, it still did sometimes back then for drops. So you know, it wasn't a complete bear market. But this one, I sort of felt that a lot of the pieces look very similar. I mean, they had different color palettes, but the layout and the individual pieces of art on the blocks, it was kind of hard to discern them. And maybe for

Jamie:

sure the variety in that drop is not as as high as And so yes, but they all individual people actively similar. Yes, but

Roy:

I still think they look excellent. It's like really you love them for? Yeah, remember that. Um, so the secondary market didn't completely go crazy or anything. But the artist builder did a cool utility twist to the drop, where on each piece, there was a letter hidden. We're not necessarily hidden just on one of the blocks, basically. And,

Jamie:

but there is so much going on. And it's not necessarily immediately obvious that you go, oh, there's a letter because there's just, there's a lot of moving stuff. And it basically there's maybe like, what's 20 cubes or something on each one. And basically one face of one cube had a letter.

Roy:

Yeah. And the letter is, it could have been one of nine letters. So AR T BL o CK s. So from the word artblocks, one of those nine letters would be on one of the myths. And he said, If anyone collects all nine in the word up locks, then they would get a special gift, or a special AirDrop or something, it wasn't immediately clear, I think at the beginning what you would get. So you know, some people who are big collectors really into artblocks have more money, they went around buying secondary. And I mean, some people were swapping with each other. And basically, they put a set together. And I think early on what the reward was, is that you got airdropped, another blocks of art NFT. And it was either like a prototype version, or just some other version of it. And you know, that was cool. And it was sort of like a nice token gesture, I don't think there was much financial value placed on that, well, the secondary market didn't put much financial value on, it was just sort of like a thank you to collectors and a nice little thing. And maybe like a handful of people put those sets together. And sort of you know, people went on to the next curator drop and these things just drifted on through the secondary a much the same prices,

Jamie:

by the way, just so we can be specific. The next curated drop was fidenza. So wow, really was able to distract people away from that, because obviously, that was just a tour de force that continues. And we're going to be getting into that in a bit. But continue.

Roy:

I think there was a gap between the end of books of art and started fidenza

Jamie:

Perhaps there very well may have been but it was definitely the next curator,

Roy:

because at least in my mind, they did not happen close to one another. But anyway, um, since then, he has basically been working on generative art and dropping things on other platforms from artblocks. And he sort of hinted and alluded to the idea that anyone who collected all these nine pieces would get entry into what he was calling the blocks of art club, or TDoA. Club. And there would be future benefits and and it was sort of again, like he wasn't saying exactly what it was going to be. It was just like, yes, maybe there'll be something in the future. I'm gonna add utility and when I give something back to reward those who supported me and collected my pieces, etc. And it wasn't maybe up until six weeks eight weeks ago, when he had a second drop coming up on artblocks, a playground drop called Alien clocks. And he basically said that anyone who was a the books about member would get a token, which they could then exchange and essentially get a free alien clock. They didn't have to compete in the gas war, they didn't have to pay the minting cost

Jamie:

on the minting was going to be open ahead of time for the people with the tokens, is that correct?

Roy:

Yeah, pretty much. And I mean, at the main cost of the time was, I think, maybe, point 1.15. But because of the gas was it effectively would have cost anyone to mint maybe point six. So that was just immediately pretty great value for anyone who collected the set. And I mean, the cost to collect the set three months ago, you could get the whole set for maybe two weeks is just insane to think about considering now, it probably 100 eth to collect all the pieces. That's how crazy things have gotten. And so that was the first real big bit of utility that he'd added to the blocks of art club membership. And people started sitting up and going, well, this is pretty good value. This is crazy. I want to be a member, what else might he add, and he I think around the same time alluded to the fact that he was planning on dropping one playground drop every month for the year. And any members will get that for free. So 12, free minutes, you know, that's several eth immediately at those prices. And now it's much, much more. So that sort of spurred on secondary market action people, more people were buying the box of art, the price went up. And it's just this sort of like his ecosystem where it's self fulfilling, and there's just sick value being produced to reward the holders of the club. He also did the thing, which it wasn't just that people who collected the nine blocks of art got membership of the club, you wanted to keep the option and accessibility open to people in the future as well and not make it just extremely exclusive. So with the alien clock, his playground drop, he I think it was 300 or 350 minutes 360 to 362. And two of them just had a trait called TDoA. So two people who got lucky and mentor one of those just immediately got access to the club. So that sort of, you know, gave some level of accessibility. And then he also had a situation with the alien clocks, they had a an alien trait. And basically, there's nine different alien traits. And if you collect one of each, you get access to the club similar to the books of art, one of each letter, and he's had a new drop this last week called Alien insects. And the same thing happened basically free token, a free meant to anyone who was a member. And he has once again alluded to the possibility to gain entry to his club by collecting certain alien insects. He hasn't said what combination is going to be required. He sort of said, I'm going to drop the project on artblocks. And then a week later, I will reveal which ones can get you access or how the utility is going to work. So there was sort of this it's almost like a game that's being played among the community trying to figure out what what alien insects he needs. He he'll drop these cryptic notes on Twitter, like just a bunch of emojis with an alien insect and like a sword crossing each other, like they're going to fight the and then the alien clocks may get involved. And, you know, it's very difficult to understand what he means but it's just, it's just, I guess, showing what it's capable to be with NFT's and utility and how he can reward his members and get the community engaged. And it's worth noting that his art is spectacular. I mean, it's not like he's just pumping out cash grab little just crappy degenerative things once a month. It's it really does look to me special.

Jamie:

Just yeah, to me, it was like he's, he's been working on a lot of this stuff for a while, I would think because to be able to go from scratch, and then produce all these new things that he's been producing would be pretty stunning.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, they really look. All three of his drops look different and distinct from one another. It's not like they're just slightly tweaked if

Jamie:

I've been staring at an alien clock for like the last six minutes of this conversation.

Roy:

Those are really crazy. They basically the animated and they animate like infinitely so you'll never get the same look necessarily this the again, it just loops in the same way that pie keeps going on to non repeating digits. It's

Jamie:

Wow, what a weird example.

Roy:

Yeah, well, they, um, yeah, so that is the box of art club and he had a drop this week alien insects, which I believe it was a Dutch auction and it sold at 1.75. I think it's all that up. and it's currently three out of the three. And is now the floor is about almost full. So

Jamie:

yeah, I was at the beach for that I was I would have meant it it would have actually been my first piece of is because I didn't get any of the clocks or the blocks of art. The alien insects I thought was pretty cool. But I was at the beach with my wife, so I didn't. It's fine.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, I tried to min a couple, I only got one. My partner Rachel, she got one. And it was a first appointment. So that's pretty exciting for her. That is exciting. Yeah, she got, I think pretty rare one as well.

Jamie:

Now Have people been staring at the, the dots in the top left of these insects and try to figure out what the heck that means.

Roy:

Probably I didn't really invest too much time trying to figure it out. Because I

Jamie:

just see some sort of next level code going on over there. Yeah. And this guy's a very, he's really got a nice mix of like this great art thing. But also, you know, like, you're saying he's doing the rewarding stuff. But he's doing it in like an interesting marketing way where, you know, there's something but it's not totally explicit. And so you kind of get to, it kind of creates buzz and excitement and just gets people thinking about them and looking at them more in a way that, you know, other artists just aren't. And obviously, if you just want to create the art, and then release it and then have people appreciate it as much as they do just from staring at it. That's that's fine. And that's up to you. But this guy is sort of forcing people to or not forcing, but you know, sort of encouraging them to be more more engaged and more curious about what he's doing, which is, it's just interesting. I mean, smart. Certainly as a professional for him. It's definitely working out.

Roy:

Yeah. And he's also he's done drops, not on artblocks. He's just pumped out more art. That is some of it. I think he gives for free to books about earners, and some of it is sort of auctioned off to whoever. And it's excellent art. It's it's I don't think I would be stretching it to say he might be pumping out more high quality art than generative art than anyone in the space at the moment.

Jamie:

Yeah, definitely seems possible.

Roy:

Yeah, so that was one drop this week alien insects. And we had to curated drops, actually, because normally, there's just one a week but the previous week, scribbled boundaries was meant to be dropped on a Friday. But as we mentioned last week, it has, right because of that bug between browsers and stuff. So on Tuesday,

Jamie:

he talks about alien insects and now we're talking about a bug that's that's very numerous.

Roy:

Is it humorous? Really?

Jamie:

You don't seem to think so. I don't either, but your reaction probably was I'm sure the listeners enjoy.

Roy:

So the first q&a drop was scribbled boundaries, and that dropped on Tuesday. Did you get in on that? I can't remember.

Jamie:

Um, I did not. I was I think I was trying to wait until 1.25 or something and just didn't get up because yeah, the the gas got too crazy or something by the time it was finally at the place I was ready for Yeah, actually remember for sure, though, because that was like, so many days ago. At this point. I know exactly what happened to me with the phases drop, but I can't actually remember what happened to me for scribbled boundaries.

Roy:

Um,

Jamie:

well, I got I did not get I did not get one though, that I know that I know. For sure.

Roy:

I did. I really liked this drug. I think I heard some people say that they didn't particularly like it as much as some of the other drugs. They. I mean, they didn't, I guess because it looks, I guess, at first glance is like a bunch of scribbles. And it seems like anyone could do that. And I, to me, it seems like it's difficult to get generative art to do that. I mean, yes, maybe you could get a piece of paper and just scribble a whole bunch of stuff but the way it connects and looks it has like this organized chaos look to me where it's

Jamie:

it looks very much to me like non generative arts.

Roy:

Exactly. And that's hard to do with Yeah,

Jamie:

I agree. It's also one of these things where it's, it's sort of the type of art that's so abstract and non representative that people who are prone to thinking that abstract art is nonsense, will definitely just go This is nonsense. A five year old could do it, that sort of thing. But people who are appreciative of lots of different Art, a lot of them are going to really be interested in this. Another thing I wanted to point out specifically with this one, and as I was looking at them, and this is another one where I feel the thumbnails don't quite do the justice. You know, we've talked about this before, where some of the art just looks so much better if you're really looking at the high res version, versus the,

Roy:

the, the thumbnail

Jamie:

thumbnails. And this one I feel like really, is superior, when you're looking at the high resolution, it's also an interesting thing, where, when you're looking at the high resolution, it simultaneously loses a little bit of that thing where it looks like traditional art to me, because now the lines are, even though they're kind of, you know, scribbly they're so smooth. And you can kind of tell now, that it's actually being done with this sort of perfect tool of the computer, rather than the sort of imperfect tool of a human with, you know, a brush or a pen or something like that. So it's sort of got an interesting thing going on. I think, for me, there's not enough color overall. And the specific colors that are chosen are not, they just don't, you know, complement each other in the way that I tend to like my colors. So it's not a drop that I am a huge fan of, but there's definitely something really interesting to it. And it's, it's, I definitely want to look at more of this artists art in the future because there's, there's something very cool about them, even though it doesn't quite strike me as something I love.

Roy:

Yeah, the artist is William tan, I don't know if he mentioned that, but it is worth mentioning, I I really, really love this, like it's one of my favorite drops in books. So

Jamie:

it's also very unique. Like, I mean, I guess it's hard to say that almost any artbox drops are not unique. But the way that like so many of them you have like basically the whole canvas is taking up with color and so little of that I don't know, I guess it goes a little bit back to the way it looks hand drawn. But the way the lines are created in this is really unlike unlike anything else on artblocks to me because there's definitely some stuff on artblocks where it's more lines than shapes so to speak. But those lines are sort of very carefully and like you know, they're all parallel or they're doing sort of these perfect curvatures and shapes and stuff like that you know what I mean? Whereas this is got more of a sort of a mad artist abstract thing going on in a way that is really unique to the rest of artblocks Yeah, I complete I'm almost talking myself into buying one I should I should just find one who's colors I quite like and grab it because I'm sure there's there's some out there

Roy:

I think so. I think the floor is also quite low still at

Jamie:

them relatively speaking. Very low I'm actually looking at a pretty nice one here. Yeah number 277 Let's This is a new segments called game shop live

Roy:

while you're doing that I'm gonna jump over to the other curated block drop phase. Okay yeah, which happened I mean yeah, we just got to get through this upload content because otherwise we'll be talking about populates for an hour which is not necessarily a bad thing but we have many other things to get to so phase is a another curated drop by Lauren Lauren Bednar and it dropped on this just pronounced Lauren Lauren Lauren Bednar dropped yesterday.

Jamie:

There's a comedic actor I think named Lauren Bouchard, if I'm not mistaken, and I believe I've heard it pronounced that way. Lauren.

Roy:

Okay. Well, anyway, it dropped yesterday, Friday. And it how would you describe it? It is an animated, pixelated. Yeah, that's it.

Jamie:

That's a good start. But you're gonna have to do more than that to really explain it to people.

Roy:

Yeah, I It's, it's, I'm not gonna do a justice. So we'll just post a link and say that it is, again, an interesting piece of art, which I don't think is quite like anything else on up looks. It's one that even more so than the scribble boundaries, you really do need to look at in the live view because the thumbnail just looks so yes,

Jamie:

this. This one is also highly animated. So to just look at a thumbnail is is completely missing the point of these for sure. Yes. I'm looking at a couple right now and I'm trying to come up with ways to describe them. I would say there's a lot of sort of like, rectangular separation. And then you have a lot of movement that's sort of happening unevenly across the different sort of rows and columns of it. And you have sort of a changing palette, as time goes on. And you have that sort of movement through the rows and columns.

Roy:

I understand that. But I wonder if someone who's never seen one is just well,

Jamie:

but hopefully, it triggers their imagination to look or perhaps, you know, they can look at it. Well, we, man, some of these are cool. Yeah. You know what I feel it has been happening to me a bit lately, and I'm not sure what psychological stuff is going on. But I'll look at the test net mints for something like this, for instance. And I'll convince myself that I'm not that into the art. And then when the real drop happens, I swear, they're getting like better randomization that's making art that I find much more appealing than what I thought going into the drop was going to be the case.

Roy:

Well, it's also that maybe, I mean, suddenly they are, the code develops over the test minutes. So maybe, if you Oh,

Jamie:

yeah, so I don't actually know how that all works. I guess the test net? It doesn't have to be the same code. They they're still working on it, I guess. Yes.

Roy:

Pretty much. I mean, I think so. And it doesn't have to be exactly the same. They can tweak it. And maybe like, if they do 150 minutes on the test net, the first ones will be quite different than the finished product. But the end ones will be quite similar. I guess they

Jamie:

probably do some more private testing that that doesn't end up on the net.

Roy:

Maybe I don't know, either. Anyway, back to phase, it was a Dutch auction. It's sold out at I think 1.25.

Jamie:

I think that's right. To it might have gotten to one just for a couple of them. Yeah, I was trying to buy at 1.25 I foolishly left my money in my hardware wallet, which I've never tried to do a live mint from. And, of course, I was unsuccessful, which was a super bummer. And I think I'll just always be ready to Mint for my, my hot wallet. Yeah, from now on. But I'm also you know, we've definitely alluded to this. The NFT space, there is so much stuff that you are for sure going to miss out on. And it's I'm getting very, very good at not caring. And it's definitely easier when the stuff that you do own is also doing great to not be so upset about stuff you're missing out on. But it is sort of an excellent teacher of life's lessons to be in this space.

Roy:

Well, since we're already talking about you know, is sure. The denza floor is 100.

Jamie:

Right, that's a good that's a good one to talk about missing out on.

Roy:

Yeah. That's just so crazy that the floor is 100 eth.

Jamie:

It really is. I think when they first minted, maybe. And I really don't have solid numbers to back this up. But I think like the most expensive artblocks piece that had sold ever at the time was like maybe 35 or something for a ringer, right? Yeah,

Roy:

something like probably, maybe a very rare squiggle like yeah,

Jamie:

and yeah, now every single fidenza is three times higher than that.

Roy:

It's ludicrous. I remember when the first fidenza sold for 100 eth. Like a month ago, maybe. And it was the highest sale ever on up looks. And now it's the floor. It really is ridiculous to think about and it's not even like this one listed at 100 and then the next one is 110 It's just there aren't many listed then there's like 10 more on the floor is 150 this is yeah,

Jamie:

I mean, at this point they're they're so thoroughly in the hands of people who just love the art so much that it's not it's not a commodity to them, or the people that still view it largely as an investment are people that are really rich and are are not going to sell it to another rich person. They're going to wait till a wealthy person shows up and goes really crazy over them theoretically Yeah, I guess we can we can envision a world where that sort of thing never happens but it does only seem like more and more big money is is coming into the space. And it's also like you know, we sort of talked about how artblocks prices have gone crazy lately, but as far as like individual big money buyers it's only been what like you know four people showed up like three arrows capital did it. Vincent van dough, did it there was like that salmon guy and you know a couple others and then

Roy:

Salmon guy is three Eric capital.

Jamie:

Oh, is it? Okay? I didn't even know it. So that's that's even less? Yeah.

Roy:

Keyboard, monkey, keyboard monkey. That's

Jamie:

a good one. Yeah.

Roy:

But now there have been a few more buying up. I mean, anyways, buying a fidenza for 100 Plus eth is I would say big money,

Jamie:

for sure for sure. But there's just, there's so many people in crypto that have a ton of money, nevermind all the traditional art world money and traditional investing money that is starting to look at this stuff as more legitimate. And, you know, when you combine that with people just not being interested in selling, it's really the price action has been crazy and can get even more crazy.

Roy:

Yeah. So I looked up the worldwide market, basically how many sales, the volume of sales per year, and it was, it was like 65 billion in 2019. And then when COVID had a drop to about 50 billion, and then I presume that this year, next year, it'll probably start going up again. That is so much money. And that is still like when you consider the amount of money that is in NFT's at the moment, it maybe a billion or two, moving around. And like most of that money is I would say not money coming from the art world. It's new money interested in NFT's interested in art, it's coming from traditional crypto, it's coming from outside of crypto and just yeah, it's just the tip of the iceberg, really, when we get some of that traditional art money flowing into NFT's flowing into artblocks when we get, as you said, like investment money, people who are just looking at it from a pure financial point of view, we can just talk about the size of the worldwide financial market.

Jamie:

It's ludicrous. I want to talk about some of the other things in this area. Like for instance, do you know what the most expensive piece of art ever is? Or painting I should say? I guess maybe there were nine paintings that were more expensive.

Roy:

What it's soulful,

Jamie:

or just what the piece is, I have both of those in front of me. And then a fun story about it.

Roy:

I'm going to start with the price and say 400 million.

Jamie:

Okay, very close. 450 point 3 million. Okay, that's for a painting called Salvador. Mooney, which I believe is the Savior of the world. It's basically a figure of Jesus. Now, here's the interesting thing. The artist is supposed to be Leonardo da Vinci. But I believe the story is that this is actually not authentic. Wow, we in order DaVinci. And the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia bought it. And then he was like, pressuring the French government and the loove, to say it was valid, even though he spent more money for a painting than anyone in all of human history. It was not even an authentic one. And so that, to me, is a great specific example of why even if you're sort of comparing how big the traditional art world and art market is to how small the NFT art world is, there's some stuff about the NFT art world that's so superior, that it has possibilities that the traditional art world doesn't even have and can theoretically be quite a bit bigger, because that you never have to worry about that happening. Yeah, with NFT's. Which is kind of fascinating. And then also, so we were talking about, like all these rich people buying and stuff like that, the third and fourth most expensive paintings ever sold. The buyer was just Qatar, the country of Qatar, or Qatar, Qatar, I believe it is Qatar though. It looks like Qatar but I think it's this is funny, though. We have something where we debate but I believe it is Qatar.

Roy:

I think it's Qatar. I'm I know you do, but I'm quite sure that

Jamie:

well. I thought I'd share your rock. Oh, boy. Well, well, we'll let the listeners decide. They can message us on. Oh, you know what, that's also a thing we can do people loving looking at our stats on on our podcast hosting feed. I wonder if we actually have any listeners from that country? Oh, that's good. I will not name anymore. If if you are please let us know on Twitter and tell us how to pronounce your country. Yeah, because we cannot seem to agree on it. But anyway, yeah, it's that that's another thing where it's not even we're not even just talking about rich individuals and like hedge funds and stuff. You've got entire countries going yeah, we want to buy this great art. I mean, yeah, Jesus, those pockets are deep. And I remember, um, Perugia, I believe it was one of the guys that bought an alien punk for ragi amongst he made like a long tweet thread about why he did it and what happened and one of the things he was talking about was like, Can you imagine how much money is gonna happen later on? When like, you know, the treasuries of these oil rich Middle Eastern nations decide they want to have a punk as an investment. And it sounded kind of crazy to me. But now that I'm looking at the fact that the third and fourth most expensive paintings ever were by a country, yeah, as the purchaser, it seems a lot more reasonable.

Roy:

Yeah, the amount of Yeah, the amount of money going to be flowing into NFT's as a whole, not just not just art. I mean, all of NFT's is Yeah. It's the whole world, like, every part of life, as we know is going to be affected by NFT's one way or another. I think

Jamie:

it is such a transformative technology with real estate medical much, so much potential is completely untapped in it too.

Roy:

Yeah. Hmm. All right. Should we read off from artblocks? Because, I mean, we could talk about it for an hour, but we have.

Jamie:

Yes. Let's talk about it. Just a touch more. You said fidenza. Floor is 100. I believe. Bringers. Yeah, there's also now at 195. So basically, but also just briefly talk about how it sort of everything has sort of started exploding. Started. That's a funny, yes. I continued continue. Yeah. But to just tons of playground projects, tons of curated projects are really going crazy. And you know, some of the factory stuff is going crazy to

Roy:

I don't know how I guess lore is like,

Jamie:

I know Palouse

Roy:

dyno pals. Oh, boy.

Jamie:

Yeah, I get I guess I didn't have that much more to say other than it's not just fidenza Yeah, it's a phrase. It's really across the board. Yeah, there's a ton of stuff happening.

Roy:

Even the Loa, like the Loa, flow floor, factory stuff, which, you know, for a while we're sitting flowers and transitions, that kind of thing. They're getting attention. Yeah, yep, everything's going up, which is

Jamie:

very cool. And I love that, you know, even though they sort of decided not to do that open edition stuff, the flowers and transitions both look great to me, and have such big mint sizes and nice low prices. They're like great, great entry pieces for people trying to get into the artblocks ecosystem without spending too much money. It's, they're great for that right now.

Roy:

They really are. I recommend transitions to a lot of people just because I personally love the art. I like flowers too. But transitions to me, it just they if the mid size was say 500 I mean, the the flow would probably be

Jamie:

one they are. They're great. I remember when that drop happened. I was really loving them. Yeah, I wouldn't have done this much lately. But they they're really great. Yeah. So we're moving on from artblocks, right? We're officially talking about something besides artblocks. How about what is what's the name of this podcast?

Roy:

Two... two something

Jamie:

Two Bored Apes . Let's go that way Bored Ape Yatch Club?

Roy:

Yeah. They've I mean, they've had a crazy couple of days as well. It really have in terms of flow. What

Jamie:

do you remember what the floor was the last time we recorded this podcast? It was probably having room. I think it might have been less. I can

Roy:

find out. I have the stats. Let's

Jamie:

let's let's look it up. Yeah. And while you're doing that, I will entertain the listeners by describing the room I'm in here. I'm looking at a print of Saison I have assays on print on my wall. I have a calendar with St. Bernard's on

Roy:

it. 15 eth All right. Okay, there we go. Yeah. The listeners from from you. Yeah. For a while.

Jamie:

I want to continue. I have a nice picture of an elephant here that I colored. That's directly to my left. It's quite, quite lovely. Okay, continued 15.

Roy:

Yes. So the floor for the apes hovered around 15. For I want to say maybe 10 days, two weeks even. And yeah, in the last 24-36 hours has just, I think about 36 hours ago and shot up to 17 and a half. And then in the last 10.

Jamie:

What was the the eth price when we recorded last two because we're at like, local highs here of like 30 to 50 or something.

Roy:

Eighth last time was 3186. So it wasn't pretty close. Yeah. Yeah, but now I mean, now the floor is 2323 plus, for apes, which is ludicrous. It's so cool.

Jamie:

We went to bed last night and it was like 18 or so. And then ape Tao bought a bunch of the floor ape Tao with the help of dingling. I guess I don't know the specifics of how that works. But

Roy:

yeah, they just bought tons. I mean, even before them the floor I think had already hit 20. And, yeah, it's me now we're looking at 75,000 us plus to get an eight. Yeah. And

Jamie:

we're, again we're sort of it feels a lot like We have, what we were talking about happening with the fidenza is where we're just getting more and more to the point where the people that have them, have them not to sell later, or have them to sell later, but are sufficiently rich and long term thinking that they're not just trying to flip them for 20% more than they bought it for. They're really trying to hold on for dear life and make a huge profit. And that kind of thing is just it really creates an inelasticity in the market. I have no idea if that's the correct word. But it's it creates

Roy:

a supply shock, maybe. Yeah, supply shock,

Jamie:

a tough spot for buyers.

Roy:

Yeah. I think I mentioned this last time, the number of unique earners just keeps going up. And most people who have one eight, such as yourself do not want to sell they want eight,

Jamie:

it's I actually just finally delisted mine, I had it listed at 32 eth. For a long time. And then, you know, we started doing this podcast and me and you and a couple of our friends joked about what would happen if it's sold. The the title of the podcast would be shot. So that's one thing. And you know, I was quite careful. When I initially went shopping for my eight I bought one that I loved the look of I loved the theme of so it's not a situation where Oh, somebody is going to buy it for one and a half times four. So, which is where I had it listed now. Yeah, you know, it was 20 times for whatever, yeah, 30 times for when I first listed it, but it's not a situation where if somebody buys it for me, I can just grab one near the floor and feel like, Oh, I just made a profit. And I still have an ape. It's like, I have a lot of my internet identity, my Metaverse identity with this ape. And it's also one that aesthetically I like so much more than almost any other one, I'm not interested in replacing it, even if I'm going to make a little bit of money. So he's officially now off the market.

Roy:

We're also living in a world where you can go to sleep, and the floor is 23. And you can wake up and the floor is 35. All of a sudden, you've sold your true and you can't buy back in the

Jamie:

Yes. You know, another thing I've noticed very recently with the apes, and I'm curious if you've seen this too is for a while it was like, you know you would see these, there's there's always people on Twitter going oh, I just bought my first ape. What are the apes that follow? Follow that that sort of thing. And for a while it was just sort of random people random crypto NFT people. Now, when I'm seeing it, it's like, it's random celebrities that I may or may not heard of, but it's like, it's people that are very successful in life in you know, at least their professional Avenue. And now they're sort of getting this as a sort of an interesting next level branding tool, or, or it's just sort of pointing out the different strata of people that jumping into the club new is available, too. It's getting tougher, and more of a status symbol rather than a fun and affordable NFT. That is kind of growing now. It's it's shot up to such a high level that you have to you have to be rich to buy one of these things. Yeah,

Roy:

it. I mean, when the bought a yacht club started, it wasn't an exclusive club. And for a while it was still relatively affordable for most people. And now it just isn't it has become an exclusive club. Like I think yesterday, Logan Paul bought two apes and in 78, or something is what it cost for him to get a couple that he liked. And that's

Jamie:

there's some of these really big social media people starting to get into which is going to bring so many eyeballs to this stuff. I mean, we've had he's a great example of it. Of course,

Roy:

yeah, we had sports stars, and we've had movie stars. And

Jamie:

now I'm trying to actually convince my wife who's a huge New England Patriots fan, that we should start rooting for the Denver Broncos because like four or five players on that team have a body to this point. How's that? daughter? She is she's not at all. Yeah, her family has sort of an affinity for New Orleans because of some charity work that they do down there. Like every single year. So they're their number two team is the saints. And I tried to convince her that her number three team should be at the Broncos. She's not interested in that at all. It seems like she's got her patriots and then way below that as the saints and then every other team can go fuck themselves as far as well. Maybe I should take a different test secretly be rooting for that. Well, I can I don't need them,

Roy:

but maybe try and get the Patriot players to get to Mapes Oh, yeah,

Jamie:

but I hate on Twitter. When when random people and NFT projects are just tweeting out celebrities. You got to buy one of ours. It's so thirsty. Yeah,

Roy:

I'm not interested in doing that. Yeah, you just got to get it done.

Jamie:

It does. really seem like it's they're starting to really spread in like various different higher level, popular culture arenas, you know, we've got NBA players, we've got NFL players, there's a professional baseball player too. And now you know, people like Logan, Paul and all this stuff. It's just, it's really proliferating. And that also brings us to the Arizona iced tea thing, which is also sort of a fascinating proof of concept that people had sort of theorized could be or would be a thing with these apes. But we had never really seen it materialize outside of individual ape owners trying to kind of willed into existence themselves. But now this is a an example of it actually happening in the in the way where the existing brand is just grabbing this brand and attaching themselves to it.

Roy:

So I didn't really follow it closely this week. They Arizona iced tea the company bought and ape is that basically my

Jamie:

understanding of the tweet that they sent out is yes, they bought one it's sort of a clean one with like one of the studded leather jackets. And I guess I don't know if they're planning on well, that actually, I looked a little bit in there applies. And they definitely said stuff about having ape labels on some of them coming up. That's really cool, you know, as like a thing to get people excited. And as a possibility. I don't think they said for sure this is happening. But it seems as though they definitely bought an ape. And they have also some sort of reveal coming in at the end of one of these board a comic books that somebody has created, they tease that I have no idea what that supposed to mean. Maybe they'll have, like, I theoretically have, like, product, like we said with the labels on it. And then they'll have a website where you connect your wallet and people get like a six pack or whatever if they happen to have something like that seems very possible. But there's already tons of apes on Twitter showed how much Arizona iced tea they're buying now, which is funny. Yeah. And also, I just I'm gonna keep going here for a second. But if you look at like the actual marketing budget of huge brands, like you know, we're saying you have to be rich as an individual to buy an app, which is totally true. But if you're a company you spend $75,000 Is is literally nothing you know, they pay millions and millions of dollars to have Kendall Jenner endorse Pepsi or whatever. Now they can get this eight per 75,000. That's like that's a deal.

Roy:

Well, now they have Roy and Jamie talking about Arizona iced tea. Oh,

Jamie:

yeah. I'm thirsty.

Roy:

Ah, nice.

Jamie:

I do genuinely nice tea. Yeah.

Roy:

I mean, I'm happy to pump their bags if they bought an eight. Oh, yeah. Arizona iced tea. Please reach out to us. Yeah, that's true. I was like, I'm happy to do it for free. But no, no, no. I'm too late. We

Jamie:

already we already did. Yeah.

Roy:

There was another sort of collab this week, the hundreds much drop.

Jamie:

Yeah. So this is, I guess, a very popular streetwear brand based out of LA. I don't know almost anything about fashion or streetwear. So I was not familiar with them until they were teasing this collaboration. But I guess it's a thing that people that care about that sort of thing. think is cool. And they've been around a while too, I think maybe like 18 years or 20 years I was writing they said, but yeah, they did a collaborative drop with the board AP art club yesterday. And if you were in the club, I guess I'm on Friday, today, Saturday, Sunday.

Roy:

Today is Saturday night. Okay, so

Jamie:

yeah, on Thursday, you could connect your wallet to the board a merch site. And that would give you a one time use password for the actual merch drop, which was yesterday.

Roy:

And it's like eight minutes or something right? Well, that

Jamie:

the they had a rug, a literal rug, which is funny. And then a blue hoodie, a blue shirt and a black hoodie and a black shirt. And my understanding is that the rug was much more limited and sold out in like four or five minutes and then the other stuff I think they have the capabilities to produce tons so maybe there was no such thing as a sell out but sold tons and end up the founder of it Bobby hundreds, I guess is what he goes by tweeted that you know in 20 years of having this company that he has never seen anything like what happened to on their website as the drop happened and they've done collaborations with like DC Comics they have like a whole Dark Knight collaboration so it's they've done very popular IP collapse before and he said nothing was

Roy:

like this. Well, I mean the community is was strong. We come out in full and I

Jamie:

also saw A lot of people on Twitter saying I do not own an ape. But I bought one of these, I do not bought it on an eight, but I got a few of these. So, you know, one of our friends that is big in the NFT space does not have apes. And we've sort of, we just, we all love talking about this stuff. And we talked about the idea of merchandising rights. And, you know, for a while there have been people in the community talking about how much potential they had for streetwear brands. And this friend of ours has always sort of said he thinks that that is more something that the apes tell themselves. And he never really thought it would come to fruition, but it vaguely seems like it is. And then also there's that I kind of want to give a shout out to the guy but I can't actually remember his name, maybe it's D farmer or something. But the guy who runs ape statics, he acquired the rights to some apes, maybe by working with AP honors, or I think actually probably just buys a bunch of them, and is making these really cool custom hoodies that are very high end. And he sold, I think he sold a limited run of like 250 of them or 300 of them the other day, and sold out real quick for like $48,000 worth of sales, which is so cool. And yeah, I love seeing that entrepreneurial spirit.

Roy:

It really is. It's great to see. And I mean, there's so many projects like that that apes are doing with the IP because they have full commercial real estate. There's there must be

Jamie:

Tammy, we're vaguely doing that here, right. Sure. Yeah, we're not super inhabiting the personas of them. But our logo is contains the pictures of both of our apes. Yeah. And we're calling ourselves to board apes,

Roy:

it almost immediately gets you an audience of now 5000 Plus, or let's say 3000. Plus, you're actively, you know, for apes on Twitter, and that kind of thing. So, there's real value to that a lot of people. Yeah, I mean, maybe not $70,000 worth of value, but there's some value. And then there's some stats, it's

Jamie:

also a thing where it's like, it's, it's for sure, $70,000 worth of value, if you can do enough with that audience. And then obviously, for other people, it's, it's not but you know, like, for instance, the Arizona iced tea thing, it seems like for sure, they're getting $70,000 worth out of it. And then obviously, other people who have less distribution or less of a real business model, are not going to have it be worth it. I'm about to go off on a slight tangent, but I was reading sort of about some traditional investing stuff. And one of the things I was reading was about Netflix, and the way that Netflix can spend, let's call it $100 million on a movie or a TV series that they create, because of how many users they have, you can create the exact same content for the exact same amount of money. And it's just a better deal for somebody like Netflix than it is for somebody who has 1/5 as many users as Netflix, because just by virtue of that size, and that distribution, it only has to be providing 1/5 as much value to all their people. So when you look at the price of apes, as far as something to use towards marketing and stuff like that, if you sort of look at it through that lens. You know, there's there's a huge disparity and how worth it it can be to spend that kind of money for engagement and, and marketing purposes.

Roy:

Yeah, just to continue the tangent didn't you short, Netflix one, so you're going to or I did,

Jamie:

I remember early on, when they still did DVDs, and they still do actually. Well, but at the time, it was like such a big deal to still, they were making tons of money from the DVD stuff, and just losing a ton of money for the, from the streaming, and they had all of these, you know, future payments that they owed for all of this content that they were licensing, because they were producing a lot less of their own at the time. And it just seemed like there was basically no way that they were going to be able to pay for this. I obviously was extremely wrong. I think I managed to get out slightly ahead. Yeah, but I definitely like if I happen to fall into a coma for 18 months, I would have woke up in hundreds of 1000s of dollars in debt, because it went crazy. Not long after I accident. Yeah. I knew so much less about about business models and the way that these sort of aggregator type businesses that the strategic strategic carry author Ben Thompson, shout out to him. If you're interested in tech and business models, read his blog. It's called for tech very, very interesting. But he talks about these business models that he calls aggregators, where basically you're are sort of sitting between supply and demand. And and you are kind of getting more of both. And as you get more of one, you get more of it. I'm not going to be able to explain that especially not on a podcast. It's not about it, but he's a fascinating brilliant guy that writes interestingly about this stuff. Cool.

Roy:

Well, let's get back to NFT's because Okay, we got off to the tangent of a tangent and is there anything more eight related you wanted to talk about?

Jamie:

I think we could talk a little bit about like the mutants and the dogs and stuff like that if you'd like have you thought or talk to people or anything about what you think this mutant thing is? Because we still have very little in the way of details

Roy:

Yeah, I have not thought or talk to anyone about it. So I mean, I think no one really knows but everyone just keeps saying that they gonna be amazing.

Jamie:

That would be insane that's that's gonna be insane. Yes, one of the one of the founders said that in discord now it's just become a meme that me I mean, all the H are tweeting. Memes are insane. Memes are

Roy:

insane. Yeah, we still really don't know. I think

Jamie:

I am I am vaguely in the market for a second dog about I think I want another one not gonna buy one soon, just because

Roy:

you think that they're gonna do cool things with the dogs or you just like,

Jamie:

do and I think I just think that you know, again, do you know about the concept of Veblen goods? That was a term that I've learned recently that's helping me wrap my mind around all this stuff? No, I don't think so. I'm gonna Google it. So I can read the name. After name description. Yeah, Goblin goods are typically high quality goods that are made well are exclusive NRI status symbol, Dublin goods or Ana This is not.

Roy:

I'm sorry, a segment we call Jamie.

Jamie:

Reading from Investopedia, which does not have as good of a description to start as Wikipedia. Here it is. A Veblen goods is a type of luxury good, for which the demand for a good increases as the price increases, in apparent contradiction of the law of demand, resulting in an upward sloping demand curve. The higher prices of Veblen goods may make them more desirable as a status symbol in the practices of conspicuous consumption and conspicuous leisure, a product may be available in good because it is a positional good, something few others can own. And that just being able to sort of put a name to that concept has helped me wrap my mind around the way the price has been able to just keep appreciating for so much of the stuff where, you know, like, just to give an example, when we when we looked at fidenza Was that went from say the mid price to five deaths. I was like, Wow, that's crazy. And then they went from five F 210, F and 15. F, it always seemed crazy. And you were making all these new highs. And yet, the demand and and price appreciation was never really slowing down. Which again, you know, sort of traditional economics tells you that that's not the way it should work. But this concept of a Veblen good when you're talking about a status symbol where the increased price literally increases demand because it makes it a more cool and more desirable product is sort of an interesting thing that has, has me thinking about a lot of this stuff in a new way. And to get back to the the dogs, dogs, if I'm thinking about the apes as a viable and good and people wanting them. And you know, so many of the people being priced out the dogs are theoretically a way for people to get in cheaper. There's also just less supply because you know, there was you're able to get one dog per ape, but you had to do it within this one week timeframe or whatever, when they came out. And like something like 450 Apes or whatever, did not even claim their dogs. So just from a supply perspective, they're actually even more scarce than the apes, which is interesting. But it seemed like they were sort of trading at a somewhat consistent fraction to the apes. But now with this recent big big apron up, the dogs have appreciated in price as well. But I think maybe not quite as much. So, you know, if for whatever reason, they should trade at a consistent ratio, it seems to me like maybe the dogs are cheap right now. I know a lot of people that are into precious metals, look at like the ratio of gold price to silver price in that way. And when one kind of runs too much, they feel like Oh, the other one ought to catch up. It seems rather simplistic, but the way that Hugo Labs is really just kind of building slowly and they've definitely teased games they've teased that the dogs will We'll be relevant and roadmap 2.0 Specifically this treasure hunt that they've talked about, which we know even less about than the meals, but they definitely said specifically the dogs will be relevant for that. And they also said specifically there will be stuff that you need a dog in an APR and I already have one, eight and one dog, but um, you know, like we've talked about with other stuff, when you have these things that you really like. And if you only have one of it's it's hard to capture any of that financial value if you have little to no desire and actually selling your only one. And I'm definitely priced out of buying a second eight, but I can I could still afford to buy another dog. That would be something theoretically I could sell in the future for a nice gain.

Roy:

Yeah, that's a good point. And I mean, if they are having this added value for people who have one apron one dog, then if you have two dogs, that someone out there who, presumably Yeah,

Jamie:

we know for a fact that are apes out there without a dog. Yes. And there will there will always have to be again because of that supply thing we just talked about. Yeah. And dogs. Dogs are man's best friend. You know, I love my dog so much. Yeah. And when when we sort of theoretically you know if these VR Metaverse is the sandboxes, and stuff really take off. I believe I mentioned this in another one. But it will be very cool to have a great pet and it could be very cool to have to Yeah. I actually when they dropped I basically swapped out my dog for somebody else's. Pretty quickly I got one that I liked the look of better and was a little bit rarer. I sold mine for like 1.7 and then grabbed another one for 1.5. So now I have one that I quite like the look of but it will be cool to get another one that I like the look of as well, I

Roy:

think, yeah, I do like the idea of having a pack of dogs following around in the metaverse.

Jamie:

Yeah, it's so cool. Yeah.

Roy:

So you mentioned something about wondering what yoga Labs is going to get up to that popular thought into my mind? Have you thought at all about what, say five years from now is going to look like for the board of your club?

Jamie:

I really haven't. It's, it's very exciting to think, yeah, not just, it's also like, you know, again, we go back to this sort of the full rights that there are giving people with them. And you have not just them who seem to be great at consistently building and not going so fast that you know, any of its rushed and feels low effort. So just what they'll be doing in that time, but also, all the stuff that other people are building with them. You know, maybe this podcast by then could be huge. People are making these comic books. Ape Tao is acquiring the rights to tons of it, they have tons of apes, so their potential for what they can do is huge. And then you know, of course you have like the Arizona iced tea thing, if that's happened, what three months or four or five months after he came out? Who knows how big of a cultural force theoretically, they could be by then?

Roy:

It could be Yeah, it could be like the next Disney next Nintendo next. something ridiculous say

Jamie:

that kind of thing a lot for like, you know, definitely the punks comics because it's a comic and is sort of directly relatable. They'll talk about how theoretically, it's the next Marvel and stuff like that. But the possibilities truly are, are limitless. Yeah. Intellectual property has always been such a valuable thing. And now the way that tokenomics and NFT's work and social media, and there's just so many ways for these things to be utilized. And again, you know, the, the way it's sort of individual here, you can have so many people doing such disparate things with them that appeal to different people, but also are lifting up the whole boat, whereas, you know, you look at something more like Disney or whatever, that the way that their intellectual property has to be used has to sort of pass through so many corporate layers and you can't upset American sensibilities too much, or we're not going to do enough sales here and you can't you can't upset Chinese sensibilities too much with with the apes and you know, individuals being able to monetize their individual ape or their small number of apes in people can do whatever they want. And it's just it's it's really interesting, the way it's sort of decentralized but is also all connected. Very, very interesting stuff with huge potential. Yeah.

Roy:

So already speaking about comics a little bit, did you there was a comic drop on the V V platform. They dropped they have a partnership with Marvel and I think that they dropped a bunch of like comic covers as NFT's I

Jamie:

so they those were the covers to the very first ever Fantastic Four comics, okay. Or at least the ones I saw they might have done other ones, but the ones I saw was definitely that.

Roy:

Yeah, that sounds like something that is right up your alley. Did you get it on the drop or anything?

Jamie:

I did not get it. I got on the first Spider Man drop. You know, Vivi, which unfortunately, I have to admit to you in the listeners. This is one of the things we disagreed about how it said, and this one I was confirmed wrong about, I will not concede any of the other ones but this one, I was going to leave and seek guitar. I'm not going to do that next week. But this this is vv, I was wrong. They're only vaguely on my radar. And they used to sort of be more on mine when you were paying a bit more attention to it. But now you've become so distracted by so many other FFTs you're not. It seems like you're getting in on almost every drop for a while. But now, let's and these I saw later, but what do you know about them? Is it basically it's, it's just a collectible version of the covers?

Roy:

Yes, again. So I used to be all on top of every single VV drop. And I have not been that way for a month plus now. So I just know what I've seen a little bit on Twitter, I think that they dropped 60,000 comic books or like comic covers of different rarities. And I'm presuming they sold out.

Jamie:

You know what, actually, I want to mention this actually, between the Spider Man drop, which was their first drop on Vivi and this one, they did a Captain America drop, which I missed out on and I'm super bummed about that, because he's probably my favorite character in the MCU. big big fan of his maybe I'll buy one on the secondary.

Roy:

Apparently the secondary markets coming to open sea as well at some point, which is

Jamie:

Oh, yeah, that's gonna be for that. Yeah.

Roy:

Um, yeah, so that drop happened a big, big deal. I guess having Marvel Comics drop.

Jamie:

That's also funny thing. I tweeted this at somebody recently, but people, someone tweeted like, oh, NFT you think NFT's are big now and blah, blah, blah. Wait until Pokemon and something and Marvel come here. And I had to tweet at them. A Marvel is actually already here. Yes. It's kind of under the radar, how big of brands they've gotten all these collaborative licensing deals with that, you know, again, because basically, they're not on open sea yet. A lot of mainstream NFT players don't even really know that they exist. I will I will say though, and this is similar to the punks comics where, you know, they're, they call them NFT's. But the only thing that's actually fungible between them is the basically the addition number of them. So like, they'll they'll do these spider man drops, and there'll be maybe four different types, you know, they have a common and uncommon or rare or whatever. And they'll do say 1000 of these rares. And they're all visually identical, but they're just numbered from one to 1000. And so in some sort of technical sense, yes, those are non fungible tokens, but to me, those are pretty darn fungible, which is just sort of a slight complaint for me.

Roy:

Yes, they are. Well, on a theorem they will use the what we don't get to the technicalities, but

Jamie:

we do not. We do not.

Roy:

So that happened. What else happened? Chicken derby? That was a drop the

Jamie:

chicken Kirby drop the those were the final. I don't know if they what term they're using. But the Zed equivalent would be Genesis. These are the final Genesis chickens coming from the company.

Roy:

Yeah. And they dropped yesterday, the day before.

Jamie:

That was, wow. Yeah. I think that was yesterday. Right?

Roy:

It might have been yesterday. I believe it was yes. Yeah. Anyway, that that sort of building have a game in beta version beta beat.

Jamie:

Oh, my God, that's definitely beta. Is it?

Roy:

You say a beat. Are you kidding? In my head? It's beta. But I know, I've heard beta like an American TV shows and stuff. So I'm willing to concede that I'm wrong with beta you are Yeah, well, anyway,

Jamie:

it's very mature of us. I was wrong about vive you're wrong about

Roy:

Well, no, I said I'm willing to I'm not ready to

Jamie:

it well, but I can confirm for sure that you are and our listeners Feel free. You know, how do you pronounce the word be? ETA?

Roy:

Yeah. Alpha Beta. Yeah, okay. Okay. I'm pretty willing anyway. They have a game in development. And it seems like to me it's gonna be a bit like Zed run in like a racing game. But it's a racing game for sure. It's got like this Mario Kart twist where the chickens will have like these fun abilities and potentially it items and like, it's not just I

Jamie:

don't, I don't know anything about items, but they definitely have talents. They each have one called, it's called a talent. And it's it. It is like a an item in Mario Kart basically will, you'll be able to speed yourself up or hinder your opponents. And it's, it's not clear if it'll be interactive at all, where you get to, if you're watching the race, do it, I think it's not going to be like that. And I also believe I read something that made me think like, if you have, you know, like, one of them, for instance, is called anvil. And basically, I guess you drop an anvil on one of your opponents chickens. I think the way I was reading what I read made me think that a chicken is only actually going to use its talent, maybe one in every three races. So it'll, it'll still be a bit more about the actual speed of the racers rather than just being totally chaotic, where everybody's using these talents, and creating all this mayhem. And then there might be, you know, just so much randomness about like, the specific order in which the talents get used. And in which combination that that would purely sort of determine the winners if, if that happened.

Roy:

Can you believe that this is our job now? We make a living buying chickens, digital chickens that have these chickens, and we're contemplating what the game look like. It's really, what is life?

Jamie:

It is wild. Yeah, it was just that. Not many months ago was the thing. I was like, I'm gonna dabble in this and then all of a sudden, it's just taken over.

Roy:

It's everything. Well, you got chickens. 10.

Jamie:

I did get chickens. I got 10. Yeah, I was gonna I had enough money for 14. But they sold out so quick, that I was only able to get 10, which is fine. And I got a great a really good one, right? Yeah, yeah. So I mean, most of our listeners probably don't know about and I guess we can explain but so there's basically four breeds or Heritage's. Maybe they call it of chickens, the best one is ceramah. The Second best is salt in the third best is locking builder. And then the worst one is called Dorking. And their rarity goes in that order. There's less aromas, and there are Sultan's, there's less dolphins that are locking boulders, and there's less rock and boulders than there are door kings. And then the other important stat is they have a perfection score that goes from 90 to 100. And then I think, you know, as they get bred later on, there'll be ones with less than 90, but all these ones that the company sold directly to people are between 90 and 100. And so yesterday, I got a Sarama with a 97 Perfection score. So that's like a very, very elite chicken. And also for aesthetics. It was it was striped, which is not something I care about so much, but definitely some people do and makes it even more rare.

Roy:

Someone was telling me that so these men to that point are for two eth. And the floor for a 100 Perfection. ceramah is like seven ether or something crazy. Wow. Yeah.

Jamie:

Yeah. I mean, if if it does, at all, what Zedd has done, the the best of these original ones will be worth huge, like much more than that. Yeah. But you know, it's it's still a very unproven thing. I guess they the developers made some sort of pretty successful app of some sort of, like, you know, pay to win type app game, so that they have experience, and they haven't done anything that seems shady or untrustworthy. And, you know, I've given good updates and all that stuff. So it looks good confidence in them, but it, you know, flat out, the game does not exist yet. No. So it is all very theoretical. But yeah, if they can achieve what Zed has achieved the best chickens right now we'll be worth much more than the market is valuing the mat. But you know, there's that uncertainty. So that's, that's why they are where they are.

Roy:

Yeah. It's cool. I I'm bullish on gaming entities, and I think this is one of the ones I'm pretty happy to own a bunch of chickens. And

Jamie:

yeah, it's a little strange to me how, aside from the addition of the talents, it is so similar to Zed Yeah, that I almost wish I was more invested in a game that was kind of tried trying to do something sufficiently different, but there's just only so many hours in a day to research different NFT's. And, and I guess this one seems development wise to be a lot further along than a lot of the other. More differentiated gaming. NfT's.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, Zed has been very successful, so why why not another copycat, I guess. Yeah,

Jamie:

well, because that's already done it. Yeah, but chicken Yeah, no, I mean, also the talent thing is a very interesting wrinkle that they've added to it. Because the Zed one is so similar to just straight up horse racing.

Roy:

Yeah. Not the video game element. Really?

Jamie:

Yeah, I mean, as far as graphics they did a good job of of making it not too realistic. And having a nice I forgot what they called it. What's What's the movie slash game? Yes, Tron sort of a Tron type of look and feel to it, which is very cool. I'm a big fan of the aesthetics of it. But aside from the aesthetics, and I guess they're they're kind of sort of vaguely hinting at, like the world that it takes place. And, but I don't think most people care much about that. But yeah, just in terms of the way the game works, it's it's astonishingly similar to just regular real life horse racing.

Roy:

Yeah, so yeah, it is cool to see. I guess a more gamified version of it with chickens. Yeah, yeah. Both can definitely succeed. There's plenty of room

Jamie:

Yeah, it's it's the visuals are quite a bit different and sort of more more cartoony, and less video game A and and yeah, the talents add a very fun, wrinkle. I think that will make the a lot of the losses, you know, I we have both done a lot of Zed racing do much more than me, but like, the losses and the wins can be so kind of heartbreaking and exciting. And stuff. I think it's it's very possible that the talents will really add a nice extra level to that where you know, with Zed when you're when you have a race that you think you're going to win. The only way you lose it is because some other horse just starts running faster than you. Yeah, but but with chickens, you can get an anvil dropped on you or? Yeah, yeah. A chicken can pull out a jetpack that sends them forward.

Roy:

Yeah, it's really fun.

Jamie:

It's yeah, it's, they've they've shown some videos of whatever comes before beta testing, alpha of what it looks like alpha, I guess maybe?

Roy:

Yeah, alpha comes before beta.

Jamie:

Sure. Does,

Roy:

you know. Well, speaking of cartoons, I think this is a good segue into the pudgy penguins because they're do an update after we spoke about them last week.

Jamie:

Okay, what what do you want to say? Well, I was I

Roy:

was sort of fearing this segment, because last week, I was talking them up and saying how I'm, you know, pretty bullish on them. And defi whales are getting into the space, and they're probably going to do well, and maybe three days ago, I mean, the floor had tanked quite considerably. It was Yeah.

Jamie:

And a lot of a lot of people were doing victory dances on Twitter. Oh, yeah.

Roy:

It it was it? Yeah, I mean, in hindsight, pre. What's the word like? too quick? No. Pre emptive premature premature. Because they've bounced back. So when we recorded this,

Jamie:

the the run up was so parabolic. I mean, there was some my wife, how did you

Roy:

feel the whole backyard or something? No. Before we recorded this, Jamie was saying, Kayla was asking if she could make another cameo into the episode and there we go. Penguins? Ah, yes, they had such an insane run up. They

Jamie:

it was pretty normal, I would think to extend by some sort of temporary pullback. Yeah, they're not going to be able to appreciate at that speed. Permanently. No, that's not gonna happen.

Roy:

Yeah, so that went from two ish to four, or three and a half floor. And then somewhat midweek, they dropped pretty close to 1/8. They were I think the floor maybe hit 1.1 1.2. And people were like fire sailing and undercutting each other. But they were consistent sales. And I was pretty happy to ride it out. If they went to zero, which seemed unlikely, then I would go down with the ship. But basically, earlier today, we had what happened, we had happened, what I was hoping and thinking would happen, which is basically this one big whale came in and which is buying the floor and just bought 1000s of penguins at 1.5 to eat and now the floor is above two again. So

Jamie:

yeah, so we also had some of and I feel like this is the thing that we're gonna keep talking about here. But the these NFT projects, the ownership of them sort of self selects for people that want to actually own them so that you know, there was a lot of people that were trying to get in on the momentum and just do kind of some flips. They're going oh, these are going up really quick. I'll buy him now. I'll sell them in a week and I'll make money Money. Mm, those people sort of got wrecked. And the people that didn't sell were the people that went, Hey, I like the penguins, you know? Or the people that were a more willing to ride out those things. And so, you know, again, you just, they ended up in hands that wanted to sell less as time went on.

Roy:

We got rid of the paper hands, people basically, as we say, or at least some of them.

Jamie:

Yeah.

Roy:

All right. Um, they will.

Jamie:

So where are they at now?

Roy:

2.2. Is the floor. Okay, nice. Yeah.

Jamie:

I still have none bummed that I sold them out point oh, for two. But what are you going to do? What are you going to do? You not not jumped back into that project is what I'm going to do? What I have been selling a lot more than I've been buying lately, though. So I need to, I need to put my shopping glasses on and find what I want to reinvest at least some of this Fn, because

Roy:

is there anything you have your eyes on?

Jamie:

Yeah, so I talked about those dogs earlier, the the board ape Kennel Club, I'm looking at them. I still like the Royal Society of players. And they've sold off a bit, I might try to build a second Royal Flush there, I have actually started trying to I made some bids, maybe two or three days ago, didn't get any hits. But I have, I have the queen of clubs, and then a full heart royal flush. So I'm going to I'm going to keep bidding on other 10 Jack King and Ace of Clubs try to build towards that. And definitely there's always various artbox projects I'm interested in getting more of as, as you well know, I've been a huge proponent of elementals for a long time, and had one of probably the biggest collections of them of anybody for a while I had up to 11. And now I've slowly sold them off. Now I only have two, which is crazy. Yeah, I have one number 369 That I don't really ever plan on selling for anything but an ungodly amount of money. But my other one I'm sort of willing to sell but I was looking at the floor of those recently. And there's definitely like, within the 12 or so cheapest, a lot of them that I think are much better looking than the floor. So I've been looking at grabbing another one to sort of hold permanently, along with number 369. And you know, pigments, big fan of pigments still and I have three I could get a fourth vacuum INNOPOLIS I am starting to actually have enough of a pile here that I could theoretically get one. But boy, it's it's painful buying your first one at a price like this. But actually I want to talk about those for a minute, even though we're not talking about. You know, I was I was sort of saying earlier about how we're sort of seeing a new strata of people that are entering the board at Yacht Club, but I've been seeing some of our you know, we both were professional poker players for a long time. A lot of people who are very successful in that and then sort of moved on to traditional finance or crypto finance have started getting into artblocks. And one of the projects I've seen a lot of them buying lately is the EQI monopolises.

Roy:

Yeah, they had quite a run up today. I think the floor was between five and six for the last week or two and now it's basically 10.

Jamie:

Yeah, I was thinking it was like eight when I was saying I might buy one.

Roy:

No, there's one at 9.5 and then straight to 10. Yeah,

Jamie:

yeah, I'm gonna I'm gonna have to look for something else.

Roy:

Yeah. So the RSVP cards. They had a party in New York this week. Was it Wednesday, Wednesday, did you attend?

Jamie:

I did not attend. I had just been in New York the previous weekend to go to MOMA and this really nice bookstore called the strand. And I was I was actually I was that moment to see the Cezanne exhibit. I'll just add that but I would have liked to go because it was definitely it sounded pretty interesting. And seeing the videos and pictures on Twitter and in their discord, it seemed like it was a super successful event that people had a lot of fun at. And I'm I'm hoping to attend one at some point. But I didn't think it was reasonable for me to go back to New York, like three days after I just been there.

Roy:

Was that the first sort of realized, yeah, event type thing? Yeah, there.

Jamie:

So they're having a smaller scale one in London quite soon as well, I believe. But that that was the first one and also sort of the biggest

Roy:

Astra it's really cool to see sort of NFT like online Metaverse world bleed into real world or like, merge. Yeah, yeah,

Jamie:

it's very interesting.

Roy:

We're gonna see a lot of that basically in the next October November. So in a month or two first Up in October, there is what they calling an artblocks open house in Marfa, Texas, which is basically I think they've bought a house and using it as sort of like a gallery museum type venue where they they will host events and hosting these open houses the first event where a lot of people, I mean, anyone is basically invited within reason. And, yeah, it's just like a bunch of people who are into artblocks are going to get together. And I think they're going to have like a gallery and some food and drinks and get to meet one another. And maybe some audits will be there to talk about some stuff. And that's just going to be really cool. I think I'm going to that you're also coming to that. I'm planning on it. Yeah, planning on it. And then a month after that, we have NFT. NYC, which is a big NFT conference in New York, which they've had for a couple of years now, I think. But this is obviously, the NFT world has exploded over the last 12 months. So it's gonna be on a scale that

Jamie:

Gary, Gary, these V friends, the whole point of them initially, right was that they're supposed to basically be access tokens to his big convention or whatever, for the next three years or something.

Roy:

Yes, I don't think he's had a conference yet. He's going to start conferences, but maybe I'm wrong about that. But I mean, he's a huge presence, not just in the IoT space, but in the entrepreneurial space and business space and motivational, inspirational, etc. So the market for his conferences is much wider than just the NFT world. And yeah, I guess he's gonna have these giant conferences, which may he's gonna charge 3000 5000 A ticket for and if you're a V friend member, you get it for free.

Jamie:

for multiple years to I believe, yes.

Roy:

I think three, maybe five years, I think yeah, right. I think the first one is

Jamie:

another good example of it of the way the Yeah, you know, they can sort of be you can have these digital NFT's that exists sort of in what we call the metaverse. But then also have them be used as an access token to in

Roy:

real life stuff. Yeah, we're gonna we're gonna see much more of that. I think in the in the coming is it use cases so good. It's relatively easy and straightforward to set up. Yeah. What else?

Jamie:

We have very little else actually on our list, we wrote down that Kevin Rose was on the Tim Ferriss podcast. I did not listen to it, did you? I did, actually. It was Why don't you talk about it then?

Roy:

Yeah, so I'm a big fan of Kevin Rose. He has his own. He has multiple podcasts. But the one I've been listening to lately as modern finance, and I think it's generally about the crypto space. He says that he sometimes touches on regular finance issues. But the last month or two has been heavily focused on the NFP space that of course has had been more interested in than usual and I think he is starting or has started a new podcast specifically on NFT's where he's gonna I think interview artists or, or creators from the space. So yeah, big fan of his and Tim Ferriss, obviously, very popular podcasts are probably one of the most popular famous podcasts in the world. author of many books and just general presence, like a popular person, I guess. And so I've been a fan of Tim Ferriss as well, for many years and see Kevin Rose go on there. I was very excited to listen to and it was cool. They talked about artblocks and squiggles. They talked about crypto punks, and I mean, they covered a lot of non NFT and crypto topics as well. But no, it was really cool to hear Kevin sort of explaining a lot of the NFT stuff to Tim who I mean, he knows what NFT's are and he understands it, but I don't think he's quite in it. Yes, he hasn't quite fully adopted. Like, right, I think he's still in the skeptic skepticism phase where he he doesn't necessarily see the value. Maybe he thinks it's a bubble or a phase.

Jamie:

Right. But clearly, we were talking earlier in this podcast about sort of the just the, the people with big reaches that are starting to get into the space and talk about the space and he's just another example. Now we have this really big podcast. That sort of the listenership is ostensibly kind of more highly educated and rich than

Roy:

and tech savvy, I

Jamie:

would say Kaseya tech savvy as well. And now he's kind of talking about it and exploring the space on his podcast. That's, that's good for everybody.

Roy:

Yeah, definitely. So yeah, it was a cool podcast would definitely recommend it and it was just cool to see I guess NFT's get some more Mainstream widespread exposure.

Jamie:

Yep. That that just about does it for us today, I think Yeah. What do you want to plug Roy?

Roy:

You go first because I need to think What do you want to plug dreamy? Um,

Jamie:

I guess I'll just plug the same thing I've been plugged in, check out my NFT project abstract of the day if you are into abstract art and you think that NFT's are a valid way to collect art, we're gonna have the link in the show notes. That's That's it for me. I think

Roy:

cool. And I will just plug my newsletters because I didn't last week I picked artblocks. I don't think they need another plug.

Jamie:

Actually, you know what? You're gonna know. Um, I want to plug this podcast you know, if you're listening to it, you probably like it. But we would love to get more listeners. So maybe tell people about or leave reviews are a good idea. Subscribe to make sure that you don't miss episodes. Yeah, a lot

Roy:

of other podcasts asks us for like what ratings and reviews yet to

Jamie:

do that. Yeah, it's a it's a thing that we should probably do. So probably spread the word if you like it.

Roy:

Cool. I will plug my newsletter it is there'll be a link in the show notes. It is Zeneca33.substack.com. And I try and release a new letter every week. Sometimes it's a little more frequent lately, it's been a little less frequent. And it's all on the NFT space. I'll either cover an individual NFT project or sort of like take a macro view and my latest issue was sort of on NFT fatigue and burnout and basically what I talked about on the podcast last week, and I don't yet know what my next letter is going to be on but yeah, just follow it you can subscribe and you'll get the newsletter straight to your inbox or if you follow me on Twitter, I'll tweet about it when I have my new you letters out.

Jamie:

Yes, it's great content. I'm I'm a subscriber and a reader of it. And a proofreader.

Roy:

Yes, yeah, I always send a copy to Jamie beforehand and he guts it and you know, picks out all the the typos and errors. Yeah. It is a great help.

Jamie:

You're welcome.

Roy:

Thank you. I think that's about it for us.

Intro:

Yep, this has been episode three of Two Bored Apes. Thanks for listening Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh