Two Bored Apes - NFT Podcast

Episode 10 - DAO Turtles, Video Games, and Poker

October 12, 2021 Two Bored Apes
Two Bored Apes - NFT Podcast
Episode 10 - DAO Turtles, Video Games, and Poker
Show Notes Transcript

On Episode 10 of Two Bored Apes, Jaime and Roy discuss the controversy surrounding OpenSea de-listing the DAO Turtles and their general thoughts on yield generating NFTs. There's a new record Art Blocks Fidenza sale (2500 ETH) "God Mode" which gets talked about, a lot of Twitter Qs Answered, and they also get very side tracked and spend a lot of time reminiscing about their favourite video games.

TIMESTAMPS

1:12 - Hello and News of the Week
10:48 - Bored Apes Yacht Club
23: 39 - Art Blocks
48:00 - Twitter Q&A
1:57:57 - Our Projects

SHOW NOTES

BAYC Token Announcement

Fidenza #938

Tweet thread about Fidenza #938

Botto (Machine Learning Art project, with a DAO voting on training data)

Day 109

Day 111

Day 113

Day 114

Zeneca's Discord

Ohm Article



Jamie:

The hosts of Two Bored Apes are not registered investment advisors. The podcast is for entertainment and informational purposes only. Nothing said on it should be construed as investment advice. On this week's episode of Two Bored Apes. We talked about the DAO turtles getting removed from opensea and the can of worms that that has opened. We talked about the Bored Ape Yatch Club announcement of a token that's coming out in quarter one of 2022. We talked about the upcoming curated artblocks drop. We talked about the Get Together they're having in Marfa, and we talked about the godmode fidenza being sold for a new record price for any artblocks piece of 2500 ether. Wow. Then we take a lot of Twitter questions and provide answers. And then we give an update on Roy's one eth challenge and my abstract of the day project. Plus a little secret from Roy.

Intro:

Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh

Jamie:

Welcome to Episode 10 of Two Bored Apes. I'm your host Jamie I'm here with my friend and cohost Roy. Roy how you're doing?

Roy:

I'm doing very well. Let me just explain for everyone why Jamie's huffing. We just just before this recording started, like 30 seconds ago. I asked him, Jaime, you ready? He's like, Yep, I click record.

Jamie:

I always say yes. And then think I'm gonna have time to have one more sip of water for you though. Like it just never fitted it. Yeah. And then I feel bad about saying yes. Golfing as you say go.

Roy:

Oh, boy. Well, now we're ready. How are you?

Jamie:

Yes. I'm good. How are you?

Roy:

I'm excellent. I'm really excellent.

Jamie:

That's good to hear.

Roy:

Yeah, it's good.

Jamie:

Should we just hop right into the news of the week? Let's do it. Alright, news of the week, the week we have another open sea scandal. Is that fair to say?

Roy:

I'm not sure I would go as far as to say that. Yeah, okay, we can go into scandal. It's close enough to a scandal.

Jamie:

It's, it's, um, well, why don't why don't you start off and then I'll add on or comment.

Roy:

Okay, so those this project that launched sometime this week, maybe five days ago, let's say called DAOturtles. And it was it came up out of nowhere, basically, it's these pixelated images of turtles. And they were promising sort of a Dao sort of decentralized autonomous organization for all of the holders of these NFT's. And if you bought them, you would get rewarded. In some token they were making up and they were claiming it was income, and you know, all these kind of things. And it sold out, they were trading pretty well. On secondary, I think the mid price was lower, like point two or something. And then the floor got up to like point one, five, and then maybe 24-36 hours after it's sold out. I don't know, time is weird. It's, it basically opensra stop trading of it. So anyone who had it, they could still see it in their wallet and stuff. But you just couldn't buy or sell or basically use the open sea. Do you see

Jamie:

it in your wallet on open sea? Because yes, I think that's okay, because so many people only perceive their wallet to be what they see there. And they don't have the ability to remove you. Your ability to see stuff there.

Roy:

Yes, that if it's outright like a scam, or it's completely copyright stuff, then they just may be blocked you from even seeing it on opensea on the platform. But no, I can see it in my wallet on there. You just can't by yourself. At some. Yes, I think I'm going to 15, 18 and

Jamie:

it sounds like you. A project that was I didn't need I had never even heard of it. And of course you mentioned about

Roy:

Yeah, I probably sold about half of them. I got really lucky. I minted three on my one Ethernet also sounds like you Well, I mean to three my one challenge well, and I got two rare ones and sold one. We'll get into it later, but I sold them for decent amounts. So that's sort of what happened.

Jamie:

what even so like, let's, I'm gonna just sidetrack you for And it it was sort of unclear why they stopped them from trading and all that. And it came out sort of in this whole process as everyone was figuring stuff out that there was an employee of opensea who had bought some and had sold them, maybe like 11 hours before it had stopped trading. And so people were saying, Hey, this guy had insider information. He dumped his and they stop trading. I'm not sure I necessarily believe that but it's obviously impossible to prove from our perspective, At least but open seated, come out and say, we've looked into it. And, you know, they didn't they were not aware that we're going to stop the trading and stuff like that. And it just so happened. I mean, this is a big issue. Like, if you're an employer, I'd say you probably shouldn't be buying and selling stuff on open seat, they should maybe make that a policy. But yeah, so that, that's kind of a second. You know, if if you were Nate testing, for instance, you could do the same thing buying NFT's on wearable that you know, are about to be featured on open sea, and then profit a lot. So it's it's not just buying and selling on open sea? I think that's an issue.

Roy:

Right? Yes. But I mean, anyway, to tell you. Yes, yes. So maybe like two days or a day and a half after they got the trading was halted. The Dao turtles team reached out to open sea, obviously, because they're like, why did you do that. And so the response given was that it was disabled in open sea due to violations of our terms of service. And then they quoted two terms. One is saying it's forbidden to use the service or open sea to carry out financial activities subject to registration or licensing, including but not limited to creating listing or buying securities, commodities, options, real estate, or debt instruments. So they thought that they were doing something like maybe the yield token was considered a security. And the other term that there are in violation of is to use the service to participate in fundraising for a business protocol or platform, including but not limited to creating listing or buying assets that are redeemable for financial instruments, assets that give earners right to participate in an Ico or any securities offering, or assets that entitle owners to financial rewards, including but not limited to defy yield bonuses, staking bonuses and burn discounts. And so these are the reasons that open sea gave, or this gave doubt hurdles for removing them from the platform. And it's sort of like a massive issue now, because there's tons of projects listed on open sea that do these things. And so people are like, what's the rule? Like? What is this an arbitrary decision? Is this the whole reason you remove them? What does it mean for cyber Kong's and stack toads? And, you know, mutant cats and all these other projects that are popping up? And some that have been around for months, maybe years that have these aspects to them? Yeah.

Jamie:

Wow, you covered it pretty well. I didn't know if you're going to get all the angles that I heard of. But you did. Because it's it's a thought at first, maybe you had sort of only heard about the second part of the backlash, and not the insider trading. That's that I heard first, because when I heard it, I originally just heard about, oh, they took down down turtles, and this employee sold them right before and I was like, that's not good. Yeah. And then I haven't really even heard people talk about that since because now all they're focused on is the unequal enforcement of the rules. Yeah, is obviously an issue.

Roy:

Yeah, it's a huge issue. And it's just, I mean, I was talking to someone today, who is planning to launch a project sometime the next week or two. And, you know, they've been building it for a while and planning to release a token, like a government governance token and your token that people can use to change the name of things and people can buy and sell it and, and stuff that projects have used before. But now because of this delta huddle stuff they like, they don't know where, like, where they you know where they are? And they don't know, can they go ahead with it, they really want some clarity from open see. And I think everyone basically want some clarity from open see on anything.

Jamie:

And then the other thing, though, is, you know, if you go up another level, it's like, I don't know how much you read about Coinbase. But they're having issues with the SEC. And they're, they're begging the SEC, for more clarity and more information, and they're just getting totally stonewalled by them. So, you know, it's it sucks to be the project that doesn't know what to do. But open sea is also going like, we have some really vague stuff that we're being told about what you can and cannot do. What is in is not a security. And there's just there's very little clarity from the top and that just is trickling all the way down.

Roy:

Yeah, that's a good point. I remember I did hear I think it was like the co founder or something of Coinbase, who like yeah, Brian Armstrong tweeted out, this SEC was like, we would love to get some clarity. Yeah, and all that kind of stuff. We're asking for it. And right

Jamie:

and the SEC had had just come out recently saying like, we're excited to engage with her and it's like, it's it's already pretty clearly like bullshit, because Coinbase is the only listed crypto company and he knows This one, and they're just there's not not engaging with them. They're just going, Hey, this product that you said we're going to offer, you can't do it. And we literally won't tell you why. Yeah. Which is so annoying.

Roy:

Yep. So that's, that's, I guess been the news of the week. That's well, yeah, that's a big thing that a lot of people are talking about.

Jamie:

That is the two bored apes News of the Week other people can have their own opinions. But to us that was the news of the week, right?

Roy:

I would say so. Yes. Was there any we're going to get into Dallas and tokens and yields and stuff later on in the episode because

Jamie:

Yep. And some news that's, you know, specific to the other segments, but

Roy:

yeah, there's definitely been some other news, but that was it. I think for the doubt total. Yep. side of things. News of the Week.

Jamie:

Now, right, remind me what is this podcast called?

Roy:

Called Two Apes that a boy... two apes, your Two Bored Apes?

Jamie:

I got the Two Bored Apes it. Let's talk about the Bored Ape Yatch Club. All right. What would you like? So they, I would like to talk about their announcement of an ERC 20 I believe, token that they're planning on releasing in the first quarter of 2022.

Roy:

Yeah, that's that's sort of the big news out of them this week.

Jamie:

Certainly is, yeah.

Roy:

Why don't you tell us what you know about it?

Jamie:

Well, let me see if I can pull up the tweet about it. So I can specifically read what they said. Although it's actually fairly long. But basically, they announced that, um, a lot of people have been talking about why is there no token, when is there going to be a token, that sort of thing, because basically, the, from my perspective, the Bored Ape Yatch Clubs, prices have been stagnant for what is in any other realm, a very short amount of time. But in the NFT space, people are feeling like all these other projects are catching up to or passing it. And it seems like a lot of them are doing that by having these ERC 20 tokens that are basically giving off passive income yield as, as the people taking part in these projects would would define it. And so there was sort of pressure from some of the Bored Ape Yatch Club community for Hugo labs to do this for the AIX. And so the company you go labs, released a statement just a couple days ago saying, we have this in the works. But what a lot of these other projects are doing is very haphazard, and probably runs afoul of securities laws. And it's very easy to release a token like that. But we're really trying to dot our i's and cross all our T's. I had to check in my brain if I did that correctly. But yeah, you dot i's and cross the T's. That's what they want to do, to make sure that what they do is totally above Bored apes, and totally legal. But yeah, they they announced that they are doing that they specifically mentioned like one or two law firms that are very sort of tech forward and crypto forward that they've been consulting with to get it done. And we don't really have much in the way of details for what it will do. We do know that the apes of the mutants, and the dogs will get some of it. And then I guess, theoretically, we'll probably be getting some sort of ratio from them, which will probably adjust the market a lot. Because right now, when people are deciding, you know, what is a dog worth relative to immune and what is immune worth relative to an ape? It's all kind of guesswork. Aside from the fact that we know that apes are on top mutants are in the middle, and dogs are on the bottom, basically, yeah. Aside from that, we have nothing to go on. And then I guess like the supply for a denominator or whatever. But if they specifically go, Hey, this token, you're gonna get 20 a day as an ape, five as a new in and three as a dog or something that all seemingly affect the market a lot. But I guess, you know, in the roadmap 2.0, we did have specifically that there's a blockchain game in the works. And my assumption is that the coin will be related to that and used in that.

Roy:

Oh, yeah, I hadn't thought of that. But that makes a lot of sense. In their announcement, they also get everything you said. But they also said that they're like trying to thoughtfully figure out a way to you know, we even integrate this token into their entire ecosystem, which adds sort of utility and brings the body of your club to a wider audience, which is really smart because like, we are seeing tons of projects, launching their tokens and doing it very quickly because it doesn't take long to launch a token. But if you just get by an NFT, and you get 10 tokens a day, and is trading, like on uni swap at this price. But that's like, what can you do with the token? Like, is it for anything? Can you use it to buy can use it to rename your NFT? can use it to breed? Can you just buy future NFT drops can use it for a game? I mean, there's varying levels of utility and value outside of just the price. And I think a lot of the times,

Jamie:

and those theoretically are what it should drive the price? Yes,

Roy:

I think so. That Yeah. Yeah. So the fact that they're taking the time not only to be compliant from a legal and regulatory standpoint, but also to just like craft an ecosystem for the the token in a conscientious manner. I mean, it makes me bullish on apes, again, as I was telling you, maybe like five days ago that I was like, half thinking of listing and ate for sale, maybe even two, I have three. But this is sort of made me re reevaluate that. Yeah, that

Jamie:

was funny, too, because I was saying, I had vaguely been thinking, I'm actually starting to build up a big enough F pile that I could vaguely consider buying a second one and was kind of interested in it. You know, ultimately, it would basically always be way too big of a purchase for me to actually do right now when I already have one. But I was starting to feel like the price was good relative to what you're getting there versus a lot of the other floors that had come up so much. You know, I just, I I'm getting slightly sidetracked here. But lately I've been getting I've been feeling so good about the cool cats team. And the only other team that I feel that good about is the board a team. And so I'm just I'm super happy to be in both of them. I still kind of want to get a second cat because they're at least vaguely affordable compared to apes. But let's not get too sidetracked on the cats right now.

Roy:

Yeah. Yes, I mean, that sort of spurred on some excitement in the market, the little bit of median price

Jamie:

went a lot. Yes, went up a lot.

Roy:

So that the biggest apes to they were like 10 or 15 sales of apes, which is very significant. When you know that

Jamie:

43 of the floor was kind of thin. It went from like 35 to 39.

Roy:

Something like that. Yeah. And but yeah, mutants it I don't know how many sales are 100 Maybe they they really started. Yeah. And I can't remember exactly what the full price was before and after, but maybe somewhere around

Jamie:

I think, I think it was like three and a half to four and a half is where it started and where ended. Sounds about right. Yeah, something like that.

Roy:

Yeah. And some dogs got picked up to that their price went up a bit because they were specifically included in this token talk or Yeah,

Jamie:

yeah, there therefore is right around three right now.

Roy:

Yeah, there was some other stuff coming out of the body your club as they usually is. A lot of people were getting their merch this have you got yours yet?

Jamie:

I'm literally wearing the hoodie right now. It's the second time I've worn it and I love it.

Roy:

They i Yeah, I've been seeing a lot of twit pictures on Twitter of people wearing the the Bored Ape Yatch Club match and it looks looks really sweet. And hopefully soon. And Jim

Jamie:

Jim was wearing a shirt that I got on the other day, which is cool. That's awesome. Yeah, it's it's great.

Roy:

There was a an eight fest meetup in London I think very recently and a bunch of pictures. Yeah,

Jamie:

you know what I did see on Twitter the other day, though, somebody was showing like all of their Bored Ape merch and now I'm really jealous that I didn't get the first run shirt from before we were even involved. Oh, yeah, cuz now that I'm just in it and I'm and I'm loving this and wanting like more of it. I'm I want one of those bad.

Roy:

You can probably pay like $7,000 for

Jamie:

I've mentioned this on the podcast but the insane price that I saw somebody pay on eBay for one of the hats. Yeah, from the very first drop was like the instigating incident for me to go Oh, shit. Like, I think I need to buy one of these because people are crazy for him.

Roy:

Yeah. Man, he was so close to probably not getting an eighth as well.

Jamie:

Oh, my God, I bid so far under the four that I should not have got one. No, you were bidding the way I remember. Likely. Yeah, it was point seven. And I did point five. And then actually, at the time, there was like, somebody had a graph of basically every secondary market purchase and what the floor was, and like what the price was basically and there was like three apes out of this whole graph that were like, way below the curve for just getting like these amazing meals. And one of them was mine and felt good. Yeah, but yeah, I mean, I, I assumed that if the forehead ran up to like, 1.2 out I'm gonna forget and I missed it. Yeah. And it never really got that person's soul.

Roy:

Yeah. Oh, well, yeah, we probably wouldn't be here making this podcast, it would be 108.

Jamie:

I don't, I would. Yeah, yeah. And I think I probably would have ended up having to paper handle a lot of my artblock stuff that I've done very well with more. So if I didn't also have this AIFF that was super valuable that I could kind of fall back on and tell myself, you know, I could I could hold the art blocks longer because this eighth is so valuable. Yeah. It kind of went both ways. The successful one allowed me to hold the other and holding that one in the success, full price appreciation of it allowed me to hold on to everyone longer.

Roy:

Yep, success begets success. I love NFT links. Oh, man, I love NFT's. So did. Yeah. So there's this, this new project came out today. bato. I think it's called. And I don't fully understand it. But it's some sort of generative art project where the users or people who own okay, my computer screen just went black, and I was like, Oh, shucks, it seemed like my computer restarted. But we're still good.

Jamie:

Oh, that reminds me of the time I thought I died. I should tell that story

Roy:

later. He thought you died. You don't know the story? I'm sure I do. But let me finish my train of thought.

Jamie:

Actually, before you do this, is it No, I'm not going to tell my story. But the thing you're about to say is much more of an art blocks related story. Oh, yeah. Should we Yeah, up in the next segment first. Well,

Roy:

why don't you tell the story about you almost dying because

Jamie:

I did not almost die. But I thought I died. I was still living in Vegas at the time. I was going to sleep. And my, my computer was like two rooms away basically I had by I was in my bed in my bedroom. And connected to that was the bathroom. And on the other side of the bathroom was my living room where my guests was, and the all the doors were open. And my computer was on right. So I'm I'm in bed, and I'm going to sleep. And my eyelids are closed as as they are when you're trying to sleep. And so you know it. We all know what it looks like from your eyes. It's pretty, it's pretty dark. But then all of a sudden, it got significantly darker. And my immediate thought was oh, I just got and what all that had happened was that my computer monitor in the other room turned off to sleep. But I was totally convinced that I had just died in the most peaceful way. And it lasted for three seconds before the dead. Were you. Hi. I mean, probably Vegas. I was hiding at 98% of my life there.

Roy:

There you go. That's funny, though. Yeah, yeah. I mean, you think you're dying every other week basically.

Jamie:

Right? Right. But this that's different. Because I go I'm just a hypochondriac. I'm like, Oh, this is bad. This is bad. I I Googled it. It's bad. That wasn't I'm dying. That was I just died. This is my first thought from the afterlife.

Roy:

Oh, boy. I mean, that would have been cool, though. If Yeah, well, I mean, to be an afterlife. Yeah. Yeah, I

Jamie:

don't. I don't think there is one but I would be like a

Roy:

man was What a bummer. I would have been sweet. He certainly taught Yeah.

Jamie:

Yeah, it's too bad. Yeah, eventually. I have time. Yeah, probably. You're probably all right. This has been important. Let's talk about art blocks or blocks, or blocks. This is probably going to be the most somber art block segment we've ever recorded. Right?

Roy:

Yeah, I think so. Not because you know, anything to do with the market or anything bad has happened per se. It's

Jamie:

just that there's something bad has happened to you and I kind of yeah,

Roy:

there is this not at Marfa blocks event? Yeah. Mafia mafia, the

Jamie:

art blocks event, the inaugural art blocks event? Oh, my goodness, you know, and our friends are there sending us pictures in the group chat.

Roy:

Yeah. Just to explain. Marfa is a town in Texas. It's sort of a remote town I think three hours also from Houston, Houston. And

Jamie:

Paso I think is the closest maybe maybe,

Roy:

yeah, it's basically in the middle of nowhere but it's become like this art, town art, Mecca, art Haven, whatever. And art blocks. Several months ago, they bought a house there and then turned it into sort of a gallery, the blocks house and this week weekend is sort of a soft opening where they had an event and people flew in from all over the country and I'm sure some international people as well to see some artblock stuff in in person seating the artists, some of the other collectors and just have a really great time and I would have gone but the United States of America decided that didn't want anyone entering the country who had been in Germany in the last 14 days, so that kind of ruled me out and your story is kind of funny.

Jamie:

For Yeah, it's sort of ruled you out because you waited until way too late to look into it. Right? Because you could have got around that.

Roy:

Theoretically, I could have. If I found that if I did the research soon enough, I could have spent two weeks in like Canada or Mexico, or then gone.

Jamie:

In the group chat, you said you would have given a kidney to go certainly, yeah, visiting another country for two weeks is less than that, I

Roy:

think, yeah, I probably would have done that. If I had, you know, done my research, and not let's do last minute and could plan my life, you know, in advance. But yeah, you almost went, but then

Jamie:

I did almost go. And then I, and then I didn't go and then I almost went again. And then I didn't go it was kind of wild. I was planning on going. And then when you found out you weren't going to be able to go that was a bummer to me. And I got less sure that I was going to go but still kind of figured out go. Mm hmm. And then the dates seem to sneak up on me. And when my friend mentioned when the plane that they were all chartering, which is fancy and exciting, from Vegas, what was it was like he was we were talking on like, a Monday, and he said they were leaving on Thursday or Friday. Something like that. And I was like, Oh, shit, that's like, that's too soon. I can't get my shit together in time for that. And then like on Saturday, I, I still had no pictures in the group. I was like, Wait a second, I fuck the week up. So it was it was basically I was a week early in my brain. And I was like, Oh, I have plenty of time for this. So then I basically just booked my ticket to Vegas. And what I was told was that the plane that were chartering had room for eight, and they had seven, so all I needed to do was get to Vegas, and I'd be good to go. So I booked my ticket to Vegas, and then talk to the guy who actually set up the plane, who I guess knew more about his actual capacity than our other friend who was very confident that I could go and it just turned out that I could not unless we spent like an extra $10,000 getting a bigger plane, which seems ridiculous. Yeah. And then my other option would have been basically to have to rent a car in like El Paso and do 200 miles of driving on the way in, and then another 200 miles of driving on the way out, in addition to all the flights that it just seemed like too much, so I'm sadly not in Marfa. Yeah.

Roy:

Sadly, there are no none of the Two Bored Apes are in Marfa this year or this effect, but we will. Yeah. It's it looks like it's a fun event. And look, we've seen a bunch of pictures and videos and looks like everyone's

Jamie:

Alan says, we're there in spirit, though.

Roy:

We are there in spirit, I guess.

Jamie:

Thank you, Alan.

Roy:

You Yeah. So I mean, it's been sort of a quiet week for up blocks, in terms of there hasn't really been many drops a lot of the staff are there. A lot of the artists today or some of the artists and a lot of the communities there. So yeah, there was no curated drop this week. There usually is one pretty much every week, but there's one coming out next week,

Jamie:

or Yeah, they really wanted to focus on getting marfo Yeah, seven one

Roy:

the same day this gets released actually is when the next curated drop is most we'll talk about that is called color gradient studies by Zack Lieberman. And it is a curated drop it is getting released at 11am Central time. So I guess that's US Central time on Tuesday, October 12. So if you're listening to this sort of as soon as this comes out, you should still have time to get in on the drop if it's something that interests you. And have you seen any of the Testaments or

Jamie:

I have but just just barely and like basically only right before we recorded but it does it does look kind of up my alley.

Roy:

Yeah, it's very interesting it's Would you say it's unlike anything else on Roblox?

Jamie:

Well, I'm having a little bit of an issue because I can't actually like you. So basically, I said, Where can I see it and you linked me to a post in the discord and instead also in his channel in the discord so I went to his channel on the discord and then kind of clicked some links. And he's, you know, somebody said, oh, where can we see more Testaments? He said, Oh, here, check out on my Instagram. So basically, I've looked at a bunch of his art on on his Instagram, and I'm not actually sure which are your gradient studies and which are just other other other generative art that he's done? Yeah. But I've definitely looked at some, and I think it shares more traits with a couple of the others. Things that I can imagine then other ones, I mean, just as a, if you're just let's go by based on the name, right, we already have a project called Color study. And we already have a project called what dot matrix gradient? I believe that's correct. Um, so he's definitely in an area that that has been covered before. You know, I mean, color studies, if you if you want to be an artist, you have to basically do color studies. And yeah. So it's not like he's copying people. He's just he's doing what artists do. Yeah. But it does look like something that I'm going to like a lot. Yeah. The other thing is, it reminded me a little bit of phases as well.

Roy:

Yeah, I see that too, because they're animated. And I would agree that it's so the last maybe like full up looks drops, we've been like, well, that's like nothing else went up look totally unique. This one, I can sort of see elements from a whole bunch of different projects in it. And the end result is like nothing else on our blocks. But there's definitely sort of

Jamie:

it has. It shares genetic material with some other

Roy:

Yeah, definitely. But yeah, that they look really cool. And I'm excited to see more and hopefully mid some. Yeah, same. The overall market up looks wise in terms of prices for I guess everything but even curated is sort of bearish has been for a while, and sentiment is kinda low. I mean, despite meridians doing spectacularly we saw

Jamie:

but they pulled back to like they peaked at 20. And now they're down more around 14, I think.

Roy:

Yeah, I think so we saw a similar thing with fragments of an infinite field, which they went really high, like somewhere between 30 and 48 was a floor for

Jamie:

Yeah, we've seen that with like three or four really exciting, great projects lately. You know, we kind of had it with pigments, we kind of had it with phases, and then we kind of really had it with with fragments of Meridian now.

Roy:

So maybe there's a little bit of

Jamie:

geometry runners to I didn't follow that market as much. I know. There was definitely some big sales. Oh, yeah, that went crazy. Hold back big. I don't know what the floor ever got

Roy:

to got to around 15. So it means the same thing with that one too, then. Yeah. And so maybe some skittishness in the market now and

Jamie:

I mean, even sculpt are a little bit right, that one minted out six, and then it got up to like, over nine very quickly. Yeah, now has pulled back. So we're getting a lot of excitement. And then consolidating on on the interesting new projects lately, it seems

Roy:

Yes, I agree. And I'm selfishly, I guess, hoping that it will trickle down in a sense that the Dutch auction will lower to a level that is just more appealing, more affordable. Yeah. So yeah, there'll be nowhere. So the last two, I guess hype drops was meridians, which all that a six and then sculptures, which was curated, so all that at five, and then yeah, then we have a bit of a break with some factory drops, which didn't sell out some of them and then this one, so it's hard to predict what it will go for. Hopefully eat less than five. Let's just say that.

Jamie:

Yeah, a lot of these factory projects did sell out too, though. Let's let's be clear about that. Yes,

Roy:

there were a bunch of factory drops. Some maybe took a while to sell out. Like they didn't instantly sell like we'd been seeing. And maybe took several days, but I'm just

Jamie:

dragging in oroboros and those letters from my future self all also.

Roy:

We have bloom and him in that open. Yep, yeah. So just to open now, but that's yeah, I really liked that he him in clouds. Yeah, me

Jamie:

too. I'm, I was thinking I was definitely gonna get one. But it seems like it might make more sense for me to actually find one that has already been minted that I like, and relied on the secondary. Yeah, because I haven't got I haven't got the wheels in motion to do either. But the total number of minted is crawling up fairly quick. It was like 300 When we last recorded something just barely over that. Now. It's at 465. So if I do want to miss one, I can't just keep dragging my ass because it does seem like you know, within a month or something, it'll probably be gone.

Roy:

Oh, yeah. Especially when it gets close to selling out people. So like, right, yeah.

Jamie:

Once you hit 700 Yes, I'm just everyone goes crazy. Yeah. Or at least that's that is a pattern we have seen before, which is maybe

Roy:

yeah, and not just with our blog, but a lot of myths. Sort of. A lot of people have what they call like the 75% rule where they they try not to meet things unless it's like 75%. minted because I don't want to be stuck holding something that doesn't sell out. But then after that point, if there's a bit of momentum they like alright, I'm going to MIT

Jamie:

I've never heard that. But I've sort of thought and felt similarly. Yeah. So the other blessing for me, it's more of the go. What's up? No, no, I was just gonna say for me, it's more like, a lot of times don't be like, oh, yeah, I'll make one of those later. Yeah. And then it's not until the market says like, it's it might be now or never that I Okay, fine. I'll never know.

Roy:

Yeah, I've missed out a bunch of really cool projects, because I see them. And I'm like, Ah, it's only minted out. 820 out of 10,000. I'll check on them later and see, yeah. Next thing you hear about, oh, everyone loves these in the midst of

Jamie:

and you just need one person who has a lot of Twitter followers don't. Hey, I like these. I just minted five and yeah, all sudden, block talks doing it. And it just goes

Roy:

pretty much. Yeah, that's how it goes. So yeah, I was just about to say that we had a massive sale this week. So the record for highest up look sale got broken. And it was a fidenza which sold for 2500 eth.

Jamie:

I thought the ringer 109. Was 3100. Was it? When was that? I think so. Yeah. 109. The one that we talked about last week? No, this was the record. I was again

Roy:

100. Was it? Yeah. It was definitely 2100 Because we had a whole conversation about you were saying it's just under 7 million. I was thinking it was just over 7 million. Oh, yeah. 100 East makes.

Jamie:

So I was thinking that this was the record. fidenza? No. Record art blocks. Yeah, that's crazy.

Roy:

It has been titled godmode. And it was it was not fully clear who bought it. So basically, Cosmo Domenici slash Snoop Dogg bought a big portion of it. So it sounds like there was sort of a fund or a group of people who put money together to buy it. And what I know at least,

Jamie:

actually wasn't even clear. I mean, I guess it sounds like it was totally sold. Because you could also if you want to, like think interpreted as the owners of it originally, which also was like split between five people. I don't know if you read that. One was bought for 100.

Roy:

I think a group of five probably did read that. But I forgot. Yeah,

Jamie:

like AC collecting and a couple other people. And I can't remember they tweeted about it. But anyway, um, I think the way that what just happened was worded you could sort of interpret it as maybe they sold off 50% of it or whatever. Yeah. 12 150 ether. Because it was not very explicit. What happened other than that, the valuation was 2500 eth and Cosmo Daymond deechi. Bought a solid chunk of

Roy:

it. Yeah. Yeah, that's definitely very plausible. That's actually

Jamie:

not one of my favorite for danzas. I'm a big fan of fidenza is in general and spiral fitness. But that one is not a grail ish one to me in terms of just personal taste.

Roy:

Yeah, I'll probably agree. It's very busy. Like there's a lot going on with it. And obviously, it's incredibly rare. Is it the number one rarity? I'm not sure exactly.

Jamie:

Oh, I don't I don't look at that stuff. All that much

Roy:

vary a lot. And I think I heard people talking about it.

Jamie:

Yeah, there I was also reading on on like the Twitter thread about it. The every single spiral is like clockwise. Yeah. In all fidenza But this one appears to be counterclockwise, even though it's following the same rules that make it clockwise because somehow the flow and the overlapping trades just like forced it to have this weird counter it's which is you know, it it definitely displays a lot of what's so awesome about generative art that we all love. But as an as a visual end result piece of art. I think there's a lot of finances that are nicer looking.

Roy:

Yep. But yeah, artists objective as well as Absolutely. And

Jamie:

I was just actually earlier I think maybe yesterday, just marveling in my head about what a stunningly Good job Tyler did in getting this click crazy variety within the project. Yes. So, so much variety at every level of the project. And yet it still really holds the identity of these are all fidenza It's like it's so amazing. It's ridiculous.

Roy:

It there's a reason that friends is yeah, there

Jamie:

really is. Yeah, they have a lot of valid claims to to what they trade for.

Roy:

Yep. All right. Um, anything else from books that you want to touch on?

Jamie:

Well, the thing that I cut you off in the Bored Ape Yatch Club segment, why don't you cover that now? Because it is it is a Jason I would say to our Yes. So in terms of esteem,

Roy:

this project called bato. It's basically a generative art style project where the holders of this token, the bottle token, I think it is. Basically, if you haven't you're eligible to vote on. So you're shown a webpage with two pieces of art created by an artificial intelligence. And you get to say, which one you prefer. So like left or so I'm

Jamie:

going to pause you right here. We're dealing with a machine learning algorithm. Yeah, basically. And the training data, for people that are in the know is, is being selected by the members of the Dow through this website.

Roy:

Yes, basically. And yeah, it's just a cool concept. And so what they did was to in order to get this data and get a community out of it, they said, Hey, we're going to airdrop or not necessarily AirDrop allow anyone who had NFT's from certain collections to claim for free X amount of tokens. And so the the projects were app looks curated up looks factory and playground, bought a yacht club crypto punks, me bits, super rare. And Foundation, and maybe I'm missing one. But basically, you know, a lot of the blue chip, bigger projects that have been around for the last six plus months. And depending on how many of them you minted slash held, when they took their snapshot, which I think was June sometime. It was

Jamie:

I think it was like, somewhere in the June and July range. Yeah.

Roy:

They have like four different tiers of how many tokens you got. And yeah, it's basically just their way of getting tokens out to the community, getting people invested and involved with their idea. I haven't done a ton of research into it. I was like when I found out about it. I was like, huh, this is really cool. And I started doing a bit more digging. And the artist behind it seems to be quite well known and respected. I saw that Matt delis. I'm sorry that his name's Matt, dis Laureus sub scape guy. Yep. And Meridian artist. He wrote a Twitter thread and tweeted about it and said he was really looking forward to seeing how it goes. So yeah, it's just a cool thing that

Jamie:

I guess he sounds very intelligent and thoughtful when I read his tweets. Yes. stuff you read. But

Roy:

yeah, no, I read his, uh, he had like, I think it was a Medium post or something before meridians came out sort of talking about it. And I really just like, Wait, right? I like what he has to say. So yeah, bado it's just a cool project. And I can't even remember why I brought it up during the whatever your club segment, but something I'm not

Jamie:

sure either. And just so our listeners know. It's I believe you have until June of next year to claim the tokens. No, I think it's January, away of next year. I'm think it's June.

Roy:

Yeah, yeah. It might be the the way the date is written is like, either the sixth of January or the first of June? Because of Americans. Oh, right.

Jamie:

National dates. Yes. Either way, you have time so that you don't need to be in a rush. Yeah, you have if you think you might qualify?

Roy:

Yeah. So

Jamie:

yeah, I guess it took to it in the shownotes. So yeah,

Roy:

we definitely will, the token, last I checked was trading at a valuation of around 50 cents each. And if you qualify at the most basic level, you are eligible to I think 900 tokens. So that's, you know, effectively $450 Free, we'll see how the token value goes. Because obviously, this is a ton of tokens being air dropped to a ton of people, a lot of them are just going to want to take that liquidity or that their money and not yet invested in the project. But I think the project is cool enough And interesting enough that the I mean, I don't really know the the future value prospects of the token, I'm sure that there are some beyond just voting on the, the the art, but I actually I do know some. So I think each month, the members of the dowel will be voting on you know, training the the AI basically to create a piece of art. And at the end of the month that art will be auctioned off on super rare, which is, you know, sto platform basically you have to pass curation to be able to list things there. And the profits will be used to buy back tokens, the Bata tokens and burn them essentially providing value for the token holders. Interesting. Yes. So yeah, it'll just be really

Jamie:

cool experiments. They sound like a fun, cool project that I'm excited to get into just by having been in other projects.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, I think we're gonna see more of this kind of stuff as time goes on.

Jamie:

I thought that was interesting when Damien Hirst did it too, but it was a bummer that I think I connected my rack the wall and didn't end up getting one because now I want to buy one For the artistic value of of just owning a hearse, yeah. And also, we would have been awesome to get one for what was it? 2000 when they now thinks are basically 10? F?

Roy:

Yeah, basically.

Jamie:

And then and they haven't even started the burn mechanism. So, theoretically, those could go a lot higher when they start getting burnt maybe.

Roy:

Yeah, definitely. And just as more people find out about the project, I mean, yeah, there are so many people don't know who Hurst is as an artist, but

Jamie:

it does seem like one word. Nobody needs more than one for artistic purposes, because they are intentionally so similar.

Roy:

Yeah, that's different, although a lot of people might want one NFT version and one.

Jamie:

Yeah. Yeah, that's yeah.

Roy:

Anyway, that was the the butter project, which I found a bit about today. And we'll link to in the show notes.

Jamie:

I'll look more into it and claim my tokens.

Roy:

Yeah, for sure. You might be able to get a lot, I think, because whatever your club up looks.

Jamie:

So you didn't claim yours yet? No, I did. I did. I go to all mine. And you said 900 is the maximum you could get?

Roy:

No, no, the minimum. Okay, the maximum.

Jamie:

So what did you get?

Roy:

I got so on my main wallet. I think it was like 5000. So let me pull it up real quick. And I can tell you the tiers. So basically, there's four tiers, the highest tier, it was reserved, I think for like team members. So not including any any of us. And then the other three sort of depend on how many of these projects that I mentioned before you interacted with in terms of

Jamie:

reading their interaction rules? Yeah, a little bit. Oh, it

Roy:

looks like I was wrong. It's 646 is the minimum to one and then it goes up to 1900 and then 4500. So on my main wallet, I got the 4500 claim. And then I had three other wallets which got the 1900 claim because I guess I just catching up blocks and things on them as well. So yeah, it's definitely worth checking out if you mean it's gonna read the qualifying projects out again, just so anyone who might have interacted with them in June July or earlier. Knows so that's up looks curated, up looks playground plus factory. So that's two separate instances. Something called async art. I'm very familiar with the body of your club. Crypto punks, me bits. Super rare. And foundation. Yeah, just cool project.

Jamie:

Very cool. Yeah. All right. We need to wrap this up because we have a lot of Twitter today. Lots of cues,

Roy:

lots of cues, lots of A's, hopefully.

Jamie:

Alright, art blocks or q&a. All right. Our first question comes from Alpert. Meow Stein. What are some of both of your hobbies outside of NFTs?

Roy:

I'll go first. I outside of NFT. He's lazy. What

Jamie:

would you do for fun in January?

Roy:

I'm a big fan of games. So video games.

Jamie:

Oh, yeah.

Roy:

Board games. I guess there's

Jamie:

the excellent chess player is or am I allowed to say that on there?

Roy:

When I was a young kid? I was excellent. For my See,

Jamie:

this is what he always does. He tries to act like he's not still excellent. Compared to Amy. Compared to anyone

Roy:

compared to anyone who's actually good at chess. I am not good. So

Jamie:

you know, you know the numbers that our podcast gets how many of our listeners do you think are better than you at chess? 12 out of I disagree.

Roy:

You think less or more or less? Wow, maybe? Maybe it's seven? I don't know. Anyway,

Jamie:

we'll tell it tell the listeners your your ELO rating. And then they can tweet at us if they're better than you have no love el Arenys well just make something up. I would love for one of our listeners to beat Roy at chess because I have never done it. I got shield so close a few times and blew it

Roy:

and I really want one tile you were about to beat me.

Jamie:

Oh my god. A lot of people I had I fucking had

Roy:

you. Yeah, but then you did something dumb, right? Anyway,

Jamie:

games are one of your hobbies.

Roy:

I love games, especially Dota is like my game of choice has been for the longest time. I love playing games of it and watching it as ti the big international tournament voters on right now. I love reading. I love cooking and just generally eating food going to nice restaurants and things like that over the last couple of years excluding this year because of NFT's I started getting into gardening, which was a really fun new hobby for me. Travel I don't have travel accounts hobby anymore or think but it's something I enjoy doing. But I think that kind of covers it. Most of the things that I enjoy doing I think we share a lot of the same ones as well.

Jamie:

Yeah, we do. I'm bummed that you got to go first because now I'm gonna copycat a lot of ways.

Roy:

Yeah, I definitely copied you with gardening you.

Jamie:

I started gardening first I invented that. Yep. And then you copied me, as well. I also, I'm gonna just say I also love games, gardening and reading, I'll get a little bit more specific on the reading. Part of it though. I really love reading about ancient history that that shit fucking fascinates me. So I do a lot of that I mostly read nonfiction. Um, but I also do quite enjoy some fiction, although I find it I find it harder to to just read it, frankly, because I feel like I can have the excitement and stuff. But also learn more tangibly when I'm reading nonfiction. And also I mix. Yeah, yeah, well, I was gonna get there, right. But in general, I like to read nonfiction during the day and then fiction at night. And at nighttime. A lot of times I've just, I've, you know, I've used my willpower for the day. And I'm just kind of passing out on the couch watching TV or whatever, which is a lot easier than reading. So that that kind of hinders my ability to read fiction. But yeah, as you said, I also do read a lot of comic books. What else is there I watch a lot of NFL football. I suppose that probably counts as well. What else hobby? It's funny, you know, before and if it is, I would have said making art. Yeah. But for now, that the art that I created, I'm turning them into NFTS it It no longer qualifies as a hobby outside of NFT's unfortunately.

Roy:

All right. Well, how about this sports betting? Is that something you still do? And would you consider it a hobby? No. Um,

Jamie:

I guess I still do some of it, but I don't I still take it seriously enough. And I'm doing it with the intention of making money that I think it's more of a side hustle or a part of my job than a hobby. But I do like I do like watching UFC and like watching NFL, and to a lesser extent basketball.

Roy:

Yeah, you export a lot more than I do. That's for sure.

Jamie:

I do. That's true.

Roy:

Maybe we can call poker a hobby now or soon?

Jamie:

Yeah, no, i i because now that is a lot closer, because I'm playing the Royal Society of players tournaments. But you know, they're they're so small in stakes, that it will be hard for me to actually think of it as a an actual thing I'm doing for the money, although I'm you know, I'm taking them seriously. Yeah. I'm, and then I'll be actually going out for the World Series quite soon. It's just it's already started. But I think I'm just gonna head out for the main event at the end. That'll be exciting and weird. I've never been this rusty for it. It's, I'm thinking it must be the biggest decline in a player's value from one year to the next year. Because I really felt like I was on top of my game for the last four years or whatever. I now I'm just like, what is poker? Yeah. But I assume I'll just see a lot of the amateurs and the blind levels will be so small, I'll be super comfortable after 40 minutes or something.

Roy:

Probably. I mean, the the main event is, that's a slow tournament. But God

Jamie:

if I do get out a table with like, actually good players who have actively been learning whatever, like I don't, I don't know what these Pio solver kids have found out lately. I have no idea. Yeah. The last time I was like, aware of what was cutting edge. And poker was literally like 18 months or two years ago. So

Roy:

for me, it was like happened six years ago, five years ago. Yeah.

Jamie:

Well, we'll get into that later when we answer that question about poker.

Roy:

Alright. Van asks, We want your thoughts on the newest developments around Dao tokens and passive income from entities. And we had a bunch of people ask questions about this. And yeah, and then

Jamie:

we also kind of covered it in the Bored Apes Yatch Club segment, and the

Roy:

news of the week Dow total segment, but do you have any any more thoughts to add on maybe a macro level for it?

Jamie:

I would say that the concept of like an NFT project, like let's call it a profile pic style NFT project at this point, the concept of them actually giving you passive income to me seems strange and like a weird request and demand from people I can totally see it with like, in the future, when you have something like glue factory horse, where there actually is some sort of income stream coming from the intellectual property, I could see ways where, you know, it would make sense for that to get trickled down to the owners of the NFT's. But as it stands right now, it just seems like people want to make money from their NFT's without having to sell them. But to me, there's not really a logical reason why they should be giving off tokens that are worth value. So the ones that are, you know, the project is so cool and desirable. And then they give you a token that allows you to breed and make new NFT's that will allow other people to get into this fun and interesting ecosystem that they want to like that, to me is cool. But the idea of just going, Oh, we're a new project, and we're gonna, we're gonna give you 20 of these a day and then hope somehow that people will want to pay for them on uni swap or whatever. Like, I'm not into that idea. And also, obviously, you know, as we talked about earlier, like, I definitely don't want people to bring unnecessary and damaging regulation to the industry, just out of like boredom, and greed and lack of imagination for what other things you can do to make your project more interesting.

Roy:

Yeah, I think by and large, I agree with all of that. It's, I think there are really cool things you can do with integrating an ERC 20 token and NFT's. But most of the projects that are coming out with them now, are not really doing that they're just coming out with it for the sake of having a token, because the market has indicated that, Hey, we love tokens, we like the idea of passive income, we're willing to pay for it, we're willing to FOMO into it without I mean, a lot of people don't really even understand how it works or where the value comes from, if it's coming from anywhere. I mean, a lot of people don't even really know what a Dao is decentralized, autonomous

Jamie:

injection, the most Dows right now is basically just like people chatting and voting in a discord channel, like, yeah, they're not real. They're not that autonomous.

Roy:

Yeah. And I'm getting so many people asking me like, What is this new thing, Adele, and stuff like that? And I mean, they have been around for years, and been a big deal for

Jamie:

me now. I was literally hearing about that four or five years ago or whatever.

Roy:

Yeah. I mean, there's huge dads out there doing great things. And, you know, they have a lot more infrastructure, and have an ecosystem that can support, you know, a reason for having a doubt and, and the value to bring to debt holders and members and all sorts of stuff. More importantly,

Jamie:

I have thought about joining shark down, I'm sorry, to just say that in the middle of your sentence. He didn't

Roy:

let me finish, and then I'll get to that. So more importantly, all these established hours have spoken with lawyers and tax advisers and consultants and like filed paperwork for all four members. And you know, they've done the due diligence, and that's how they can operate these, you know, international organizations, you know, dealing with financial instruments and not feel like, you know, how members feel like, are we gonna get in trouble the SEC, what are we really meant to do with tax and all that kind of stuff? Whereas all these new ones don't do that? Yeah.

Jamie:

So shocked. Sounds like so many of these new ones are big. They're like, just chat rooms.

Roy:

Yeah, they're not. Yeah,

Jamie:

they're not gonna hang themselves down. But they're not really Yeah.

Roy:

It. I mean, I guess it's sort of can put open sea in a tricky situation, where they may want to restrict trading for all these new ones, but then allow some of these more established ones. And, you know, how do they decide what is? Yeah, it's an official down

Jamie:

there. They're in a tough spot for sure. Yeah. Basically, if they want to be consistent, they're gonna have to get rid of a bunch of stuff that is bringing them not negligible percent of the revenue, and the cyber cons or whatever.

Roy:

Yeah. Yeah, don't envy them. Anyway. shopto. You asked if I had considered joining sharp Dell. So shutdown was basically a Dell which they buy. assets in another Dell called the nouns or the nouns project.

Jamie:

When they try to buy the nouns they get oxygen, which gets them into the nouns down.

Roy:

Yes, you want to explain what the nouns dough is.

Jamie:

So nouns is a project. I don't know a ton about it. But basically, it's a project from some big brained oh geez in the space, and they auction off one noun per day. And all of the money from the sale of the auction goes straight into the treasury of the Dow. And the only way to get into the Dow is to own a noun.

Roy:

A noun is an NFT. And it's sort of like this pixelated character. So it's called a noun, but it's not not just the word. Yeah,

Jamie:

right. But I think that the it'll be like watermelon, and then the pixelated characters, like a guy with a watermelon forehead or whatever. Yeah. But yeah, it's it sounds like one of these sort of decentralized, we're gonna build we're very smart type projects. That is interesting to get into. But the nouns are currently going for so much money, that it's crazily exclusive. So then this shark Dao basically, is is crowdfunding purchases of these nouns so that people that don't have 100 eth can also get into the nouns down. Yeah, that's basically it. So it's a doubt within a doubt. situation.

Roy:

I have not really looked into sharks doubt or thought about getting involved. It's probably not a bad idea, because I really love

Jamie:

Yeah, look into it more, for sure. Soon. We smart.

Roy:

Like, maybe two days ago, we had sort of a thought experiment game. We're like, if you had 3000 eth, how would you spend it? And I'm now thinking I'll probably get it out.

Jamie:

Because Oh, yeah, that could be smart. Yeah, that seems like I was struggling to Boy, that's for our listeners out there. 2000 eth is a lot of money. That's you might think in your head. It's easy to spend, but is not as easy as you think. Yeah, you

Roy:

get like a full up look set. You get a crypto punks and Bored Apes. And you still have like 1500 eth. Left or something?

Jamie:

Yeah, it's crazy. Yeah. I love that though.

Roy:

Yeah. All right. I think all right.

Jamie:

That was that? Yeah. Twin, because we already covered it a bit in the other ones as well. Yeah. Twitter, Dad says impending tax liquidation bear market. Question mark. And then I said something and he said another thing? And we can answer that in a bit?

Roy:

Yeah. I feel like this is more of a US based question, perhaps is that is that like an upcoming?

Jamie:

So I'm a little confused about it. Because to me, I can see that fear, but it would be like a March of next year thing, because generally speaking, you have to pay your taxes in April here. Or at least by April, I should say. Um, and, you know, basically my whole adult life, I would wait till the last second. So that's, that's, I guess that's why I think of it as April. But I guess like more responsible adults and stuff will like do it in January and get another way? That kind of thing. Yeah. But I don't really know why they're asking that now. Maybe he's saying in pending and just looking very far ahead, though. But, you know, there's no, you don't need to liquidate to pay taxes unless you've already done liquidating before. So just follow rule number one have NFT's and don't sell them. They don't have and then you don't have any taxes to pay on them. Yeah. And you get to keep your sweet and T's

Roy:

and maybe you can get AirDrop bottle tokens and this, that and the other.

Jamie:

Right. And then as long as you don't sell those, you don't have a tax?

Roy:

Yeah. No,

Jamie:

I mean, I just have awesome NFT's.

Roy:

I think that there probably will be some sort of effect on the market. I guess. But I have no idea of figuring out how to quantify when Yeah, I think how

Jamie:

it's very hard to tell. I would say Hey, Andy. Oh, yeah, shout out to Andy. Anyway. In probably stop it, I'm probably contributing slightly to the bearishness and softness in the market just by being aware of my upcoming tax bill. And so, you know, I think there's probably a lot of people out there like me, who are already considering it, and either selling stuff because they know they have taxes coming up or not in meat, because, you know, for the first four months or whatever, inanities I would just always have a balance of zero if basically, unless I knew tomorrow there was something coming up I wanted to meet or whatever. I was just always just buying buying more NFT's that I liked or thought were good or whatever. Whereas now I'm you know, having sales and not immediately putting 100% of it back into NFT's. And it's basically purely because I know I'm going to have this big tax bill next year for NFT's. So I wonder how many people are actually going to be scrambling and causing a bear market in the future because of it, and how many people are just, you know, contributing to the lack of the market continuing to just go straight up, because now they're getting to a point where they go, Oh, I now have so many gains, I can't just all plow immediately back in.

Roy:

Yeah, it's hard to know. I mean, I would suspect that a lot of people are doing that not really thinking about taxes much and so easy to get caught up in just the buying and selling of entities. And it's sort of like, kind of disconnected from real life, money and real world because it's like this fake internet play money. Aetherium. And a lot of people, especially new to the space may not necessarily be thinking about taxes, but and that might result in you know, come the end of the year, January, February, March. A lot of people are like, hey, tax what I do figure it out, and then they're like, oh, shit, I owe a bunch. And then they start selling. Yeah,

Jamie:

it does seem kind of like the person who's most successful in all of NFT's is going to be the person that makes the best tax software. Yeah. Because it's going to be such a pain in the ass to get all this data by hand. And, and it will just be so easy, theoretically, to put your ether scan in and then just have it spit out something.

Roy:

Yeah. And like everyone in the world. Does NFT's in crypto will want to, we all

Jamie:

desperately want this product, let alone the

Roy:

government of every country is going to want their own product. Yeah. Hey, we want to know how much tax we're owed. And right. So he went on so the back and forth you had with him was about his avatar, which was from Final Fantasy Three slash six. And then he added an extra question, which was like he said, please add a small segment on the games you love to children, and how it informs your love for pics a lot today. What games did you loves as a child?

Jamie:

Well, we could be here all day. I'll just give a kind of an over a a bit of an overview. The first console we had at my house was the Nintendo eight bit. And I spent a lot of time playing a lot of those games, punch out duck con, Super Mario supermario two and three, stuff like that. Ninja Gaiden kung fu that kind of thing. And then I had a second Genesis I never had a Super Nintendo and 64 and then the the JRPG was probably my favorite style of game that I played a lot of so I did play Final Fantasy Three slash six. I love Zeno gears as well, which was a PlayStation game. He says the thing about your love for Pixar today, you know what I noticed? When I was in NFT's for a long time I was not I was not into so much of the pixel art. But I've been finding very recently some pixel artists whose art I really like which was actually quite surprising to me. And and some of it I've found does definitely relate back to these pleasant memories of playing these these old video games these 16 bit games.

Roy:

Yeah, I think I'm pretty much the same. I when I got into NFT's I would look at most of the pics a lot. NFT's I saw. I was like, No, that's not looking great. That doesn't look great. Why is it so expensive? And yeah, more recently, I am starting to appreciate some maybe most of it's actually

Jamie:

one guy in particular who I sent you the link for him maybe Oh, the Japanese style. Yeah, whose stuff I stumbled upon that I fucking love. Unfortunately, a bunch of other people with a lot of theory and have also discovered him already and decided they love his stuff. So it's actually quite expensive. I unfortunately don't have the information in front of me so I can't give his name but I'll I'll include him in the show notes because his work is great. And if if you like Pixar, and you have enough money He does great stuff. Yeah.

Roy:

I guess to add some games I loved as a child. A lot of the same ones. I had a Super Nintendo you know all the Mario games and then for JRPGs Final Fantasy seven was probably my favorite one. Yeah,

Jamie:

I mean, I like Megaman games. Did you play those?

Roy:

I played them a little bit. I didn't play them a lot.

Jamie:

I played a lot of Mega Man three. That was a fun game to me.

Roy:

Yeah, I did enjoy them when I played them.

Jamie:

i Oh, in Diablo two that was

Roy:

it. Yeah.

Jamie:

I played so many video games like so many hours you

Roy:

play Diablo one? Yeah, of course. I did. Yeah, I used to. It was such a fun game. Me and my ex would like play two player. I think it was PlayStation One was on and just so many hours just sitting in front stop. Yeah,

Jamie:

I was. I was just thinking I would have sleepovers with my friend Gary Kollek and we were playing Do you remember the game gauntlet legends? I don't know if you played that one out. I think it was originally an arcade game and then they ported it to me, I think in 64, but like, we would play till six in the morning. Yeah, totally irresponsible. Yeah. So much fun.

Roy:

Theme Park. Did you ever play that on students? Oh, that was a great game.

Jamie:

This by the way, this segment can go on for a long time because I could keep doing this. You know what I really like Secret of Evermore was a Super Nintendo game that I played on an emulator that I really

Roy:

didn't play that Secret of Mana. You play that? I found

Jamie:

that that's one of those ones that I played the first 40 minutes of Yeah. And it just it didn't get me enough and moved on to another one. But I've obviously heard great things.

Roy:

Yeah. Breath of Fire three.

Jamie:

Nope. I never I never really touched any of the Breath of Fire games. Yeah, I think what was the one that I tried to get you to play that you didn't like that much? It's like a tactical one.

Roy:

Ah.

Jamie:

Valkyria Chronicles. Yes. I think it was number two specifically. I played in beat that one though. That was maybe the most modern game that I played in beat and I really liked that.

Roy:

Yeah, I played I enjoyed it a little bit. But oh, Final Fantasy Tactics.

Jamie:

Yeah, you love first time six characters. Oh my god. How much you

Roy:

love these tactics style games? I'm still surprised you never get into boxes?

Jamie:

Well, but they don't have a game right? You're just trying to get me to pay hundreds of dollars for a character and I could just play Final Fantasy Tactics.

Roy:

Oh, boy. Oh, boy.

Jamie:

What I wanted to keep talking about this. Yeah,

Roy:

we could talk about games all day. I love Starcraft. Yeah,

Jamie:

I played a ton of Hearthstone. I probably spent $1,400 on Hearthstone cards.

Roy:

I think I spent more. There was really

Jamie:

no, he's not play as much as me. What's that? You didn't play as much as me? Either.

Roy:

I played more than you. I'm sure for like the first three or six months as when I first got into it. As I usually do. I get super obsessed about something and play absurd amounts. And then

Jamie:

Oh, speaking of which civilization 6. For that one for that

Roy:

game. I think both of our partners hated how much we love, like yes, for sure. Yeah. Because it's just like one more turn. Oh, and then it's like, yeah, exactly. It's

Jamie:

very difficult to find the time to stop. Yeah,

Roy:

but then eventually, I think because the AI sucks so much. It was just like, ah, yeah, we were too good. Now, every game is boring.

Jamie:

And then the one time we played like a free for all where we weren't on the same team. I got fucking pissed at you for security. And then I could I no longer was interested in winning the game. I was only interested in helping the computer. Yeah, have an advantage versus you? And I was like, this is this is not gonna work out.

Roy:

It was fun, though. That is

Jamie:

a fun game. Oh my god. Charlie struggles a great game as well. I don't know if I counsel him because he's looking for video games, right?

Roy:

Yeah, I guess in my head. I'm playing it on my computer sorts of video games. Yeah, it's a

Jamie:

boy actually. He also does just say games. There we go. Just try and pull out of my brain. A couple others that had a big impact on me. Before we can move on from this question. Oh, you know, you know, it was a big one for me. Well, this is a fun little story. The X Men arcade game, not the Marvel vs Capcom one. But there was an excellent one. It was just like a classic beat up like Double Dragon or whatever style. Yeah, um, and at our local arcade, they had it. I always thought it was a lot of fun. But like, if I would go to an AR kid, my parents would give me maybe $2 Maybe. And that that was just not even close to enough to beat the game. And then when I was 13, I went out to Oregon. My home just fell on me fix this. I went out to Oregon to visit my uncle and cousins. And they had a arcade there were all the games took nickels, which is a five cent coin. So you get five times as much play for the same amount of money. And because it was a vacation when my parents sent me off with like a $20 bill or whatever, for this cross country. And I was so excited. And I just got a giant sack of nickels and anybody that would walk by the machine. I'd be like, here's a nickel if you want, like you can join me and help me out. I'm beating this game for sure. And I beat it and it was I was elated. That was one of the pinnacles of my life.

Roy:

Yeah. Awesome. Well, that reminds me of the arcades in Japan. That was so much fun. Oh

Jamie:

my god. We had So much fun in those arcades in Japan. Holy shit shout out to any of our listeners that either live in Japan or have visited their arcade tech is so much goddamn better than what we're dealing with next. Holy shit was that stuff awesome. There were so much fucking fun. You

Roy:

go into an arcade, it was like six storeys high, just level up level full of different games. And, you know, like level two

Jamie:

would be all fighting games. Yeah, level three would be like all shooters, that kind of thing. And like,

Roy:

I mean, specifically in Tokyo, where I remember you just walk down the street or around the district, and it'd be like Dustin's these arcades.

Jamie:

Yeah. And so when I've tried to explain it to people, when I'm telling them how much better the arcade arcades were there, I wouldn't even bother trying to talk about like, the are the very video gaming ones, I would just explain them how shitty claw games are here and how awesome they were there. And that was kind of the way I would try to explain how much thoroughly more awesome they were that was. I had not had that much fun playing games and say I was a child. Yeah,

Roy:

it really didn't feel like being a child again. Yeah, do you remember those games where I don't think we ever played them cuz we didn't understand them. But they had like, this big screen slash board where people have like playing cards and local like trading cards. Yes. And there was like, some interaction with the cards and the game and

Jamie:

I didn't see like one of them for a second, but I had no idea what was going on. It was in Japanese. It didn't have the cards, but that was another thing. We're like, Yeah, these people would come to these games and they had something physical. It seemed like like almost Magic the Gathering cards that would the the arcade game would detect and utilize somehow. Oh, oh, that was a lot of fun.

Roy:

Japan.

Jamie:

Oh, I'm gonna keep going. Lemmings was a game that I played a lot as a kid.

Roy:

I love lemmings. Oh, that was a fun one. Yeah. Sonic. Ooh,

Jamie:

I click a little bit of Sonic. What about scorched earth? Did you ever Oh, yeah. You played a ton of Oh, yeah. That was super fun.

Roy:

Yeah, that at a home computer and me my brother would play a lot. And some friends.

Jamie:

Oh, I loved that one. Yeah.

Roy:

I kind of want to play that again. Surely? Sure. We have the tech to like, play online.

Jamie:

I've played it on a browser like probably once every two and a half years for my whole life. Because I'll just be like, Oh, I remember how often death said Do you remember the item? nukes? No. Massive nukes were basically just a single nuke that said was the one that would like shoot off and then split into seven massive news. It was like the

Roy:

ultimate one. Yeah.

Jamie:

Oh my God. What a great game. Yeah, how good a game I literally don't want to stop talking and thinking about this week. But wait,

Roy:

we can still talk about games. But let's talk about NFT games.

Jamie:

Well, but that wouldn't be answering this guy's question.

Roy:

Fine. We should move on. We can we can wrap

Jamie:

this up though. Right? We don't need to go on all day. Especially for people that don't care about video games. Going to totally different area. Holy shit. How boring is this? Alright, alright. Yeah, fine. We'll move on.

Roy:

Yeah. Wally says, when you were starting out, did you always follow rule one, wondering how you evaluate pulling the plug on an investment in a project versus staying in for the long haul, with little price price movement when your bankroll is small. So let's say between one to 5/8. So rule one, he

Jamie:

said just so our listeners know that was his suggestion for small bankroll

Roy:

small bankroll one to five E's. Rule one is something that I guess came up with and have been talking about, mostly in a joking manner, but semi seriously, and it is never sell NFT's just because

Jamie:

it's mostly serious. And then slightly jokey. Okay, in terms of what you actually believe is correct. It's it's closer to being the truth than yes, a joke. I think that's true.

Roy:

I believe that most NFT's by if you just hold on to them, they will do well in the long run. And it's sort of been historically proven, at least for things that, you know, were launched several months ago and maybe wondering, well, a lot of them have really come back and research. Yeah, but obviously, if your bankroll isn't large, and it's sort of like that opportunity cost issue where if you're stuck in a project when the price isn't really moving much, and it is hindering you from taking advantage of other opportunities that seem fancy you have no choice tough to break rule number one. Yes. And I certainly did it a lot. I mean, I sold heaps You know, several months ago, even now I'm still selling for liquidity. And it's just it's always a liquidity juggle in this in this space. And there's always great new projects coming up. And you always hit a break number one, which it sucks,

Jamie:

but I will, I will go ahead and also answer that first question. So I definitely did not always follow it. I still don't I sold to see him to starry night the other day on mass. Yeah. And the floor is literally like double where it was when I sold it.

Roy:

Yeah. That's those are so crazy. How you evaluate pulling the plug on investment in the project? versus staying in it? That's a tricky question to answer. I think. I would say, you don't necessarily. Break rule number one don't necessarily sell just for the sake of selling. But if you think that there are other opportunities out there, which you're seeing, and you can't take advantage of. And this project that you're in and considering selling is, is just one that you might want to sell. Look at. I mean, see what the team is doing. See what the community is doing the in the discord and just like, is there a lot of activity? Or?

Jamie:

Yeah, that's sort of what I was gonna say is like, sometimes I'll, I'll feel like I've kind of lost interest or lost touch with the project. And then I'll go, I'll try to force myself to learn about what's been going on, and maybe things that I know, they were talking about in the future, if there's been progress on them, that sort of thing. But then also sort of trusting myself to where if I find, I can't even bring myself to learn about this project, it's it's time for me to move on.

Roy:

Yeah, yeah, I would say that's probably the biggest thing, just, you know, check in with the team and what's going on, or they're doing stuff. Is it? Like, have I been working on releasing companions or a game and has been a wild? Is it likely that they're going to release soon, and price is going to go up? Or is it just sort of been, you know, not a lot of stuff happening, and the price is just stagnating? And you could better use the money elsewhere?

Jamie:

Yeah. And this also goes back to maybe Rule number two, or whatever the rule is, that says to have multiple of the thing. Yeah, you know, he's saying, pulling the plug on an investment in a project, which to me, sounds like you're getting rid of all of your investment in it. But again, if you buy multiple pieces from a single project, which is definitely something you can do, even with a small bankroll in the one to five F range, especially up at that higher, closer five, part of it, you can definitely have multiple fun projects. And then you can, you know, so one of the projects that feels a little bit like it's stagnating, and then that'll give you money for something new. That'll let you not feel like you're sticking around in a project that you're losing faith in. But it will also allow you to capture some of the potential upside if if things do turn around in that project.

Roy:

Yeah, and not only capture the financial upside, but like, saved you the mental anguish of if it doesn't go on to, you know, Moon adduced. Fantastically, you didn't sell all of your energy,

Jamie:

emotional well being of capturing the upside. Yes, missing out when Yeah, yeah, for sure. That's a legitimate thing. Yeah. It's also like, I think, you know, I was saying about, if you can't, if you can't bring yourself to research a project, once you sell out of it completely, unless it's a very compelling project or project that is going to keep doing well, I feel like it's even harder. So keeping some NF T's means to me, I feel like, I'm going to be a little bit more aware or liable, at least to be more aware of what the project, excuse me is doing. So in terms of staying abreast of projects, it's, I feel like it's good to stay an owner of them, and then that will hopefully allow you to make better decisions in the future. Now, you know, when you're somebody like you, and you're a part of all of these projects, you're probably hindering yourself mentally, by having tiny little pieces of your brain worrying about what all these projects are doing, because you're just in too many. But you know, for somebody that only is working with a smaller bankroll of one to five, you're probably only in, you know, five or six projects maximum, I would think, you know,

Roy:

yeah, no, I definitely agree with

Jamie:

what are like maybe, I guess, eight to 10 or something, whatever. But yeah, enough that you can definitely stay abreast to some degree of of what all of them are doing.

Roy:

Yeah. I mean, yeah, I'm definitely in too many. And like you said, it's, yeah, just too much to keep track of, but I think we answered that.

Jamie:

Ben says when are profile pic project's going to run out of steam.

Roy:

Hmm. I mean, who knows? Is the real answer to that.

Jamie:

Now, are they asking about when our new profile pic projects not going to sell out and start moving immediately? Or when our existing ones cuz I feel like every existing one runs out of steam for a while and then kind of stagnates and then maybe goes down. Maybe goes back again. But like, it doesn't seem to me like all profile pic projects are just going up only like that's certainly not happening anymore.

Roy:

No, definitely not. A I mean, we're seeing so many launch every single day now.

Jamie:

Yeah. I remember when Bose on the block came out, there was a lot of talk in our chat like, Is this the end? How many of these are there? And it was like Jesus, we had no idea what was happening.

Roy:

Yeah. So it legitimately for the last probably four months now. Every couple of weeks.

Jamie:

Everybody's been asking this. Yeah,

Roy:

everyone's thinking, is this the top? Is the market? oversaturated? Maybe there's so many, surely there's not enough people, surely there's not enough money they it can't keep going and then just keeps going. And

Jamie:

yeah, you know, what also I feel like I'm finding a little bit is that they really sort of play well with each other to where, like, just let's take an ape, for instance, you have an ape, and they get involved in these other projects, but because their sort of identity is an ape, it's hard to perceive that, you know, the other projects are going to succeed as much by them being in it just in terms of clout, and importance and emotions and stuff like that. But when somebody in that spot just goes okay, you know what, this is too close to life changing money, and they sell the rape, their new profile picture is not a picture of them. They're not now they're a gutter cat, or now they're a cool cat or now they're cryptoads. So I feel like people have, they're sort of their number one. And then like they're their backups, and I feel like people are they're sort of happy to own these other ones that they think other people might like better, but then also have sort of the optionality of slipping into that sort of Persona, and community. More so, you know, like, specifically 118 that I follow shrewd, Charlie, he's still an ape, first guy, but he's got very into these lazy lions lately. And it's just, he's, he's a part of both of these communities in a very real way now, and it seems like you know, the, the ability to, to really be active in the discourse and active in the market. And all this stuff is not just limited by your profile picture. I'm feeling fairly identified with the Coolcat community these days, even though I'm ostensibly an ape, and my avatar is innate. So I think, you know, there was some sort of sense that people only needed one profile picture and the rest of it was we're all just kind of buying them to give to somebody else later. But it seems like as the projects develop and have more dimensions than literally just the profile picture, it becomes much more sustainable for the projects to just stick around because there are a lot more than just a image trial it's more than just a JPEG.

Roy:

Yeah, I completely agree. I I mean, yeah, obviously I'm an ape, I have my a profile picture, but I 100% Spend more time like in other discords in other communities, even if I don't have them in my profile picture I spent some time they got a cat discord I spend some time in the boss beauties. Discord, I spend some time in what app looks is a big one. I love spending time there. Although I guess that's not really a profile picture. But they do

Jamie:

have a couple projects. So that would sort of qualify, right? Yeah, definitely. Yeah. Cat blocks, name buds, maybe algo bots was sort of the big one. Oh, yeah. I'll

Roy:

get boats for sure. Dino Pals, maybe. Anyway, yeah. I think that sort of the this last point you made about how these projects are evolving into things more than just JPEGs you know, board if say they have a blockchain game coming up Coolcat sounds like they're having a game coming out. They're having a token coming out. The basically evolving into brands and those who own them are sort of in a way early investors are founding members of this decentralized innocence, brand, identity, community project, thing entity, which a lot of these these teams are going to and are creating these massive Things like with merch and with games, and with comics and animated shows, and they're really evolving far beyond just a jpg. And by owning one or multiple, it's not just about the community. Now, it's not just about the identity and your own personal avatar profile picture, it's sort of an investment in the future of the brand. And I think that is, at least for me, why I have several of many of these profile picture projects. And even if I don't spend time in the discord, even if I don't identify, on a personal level, I can see that they're building something amazing. And I just want to have a financial interest in it.

Jamie:

Yeah, you know, what I've found recently is a lot of people, then the normies in my life are adjacent to it, that we're very capable of dismissing what I would say before about the projects, like, you know, you said, Well, it's, it's sort of like, I have a membership to a club or whatever. And they're like, Okay, well, what does that get you and you go, like, private discord channels, that that means nothing to them. But that the I'm doing 1000 person yacht party on the Hudson, like, that is a fucking cool thing. And you you can't get in if you're not in the club, you have to be a plus one of one of the 250 people that get a plus one, or be in the club, and that's fucking it. And it's like, that, that is a thing that, um, you know, it's, it's, it's not just a profile picture project, is it?

Roy:

No, that's a huge

Jamie:

in real life. Like, you know, people go through life, and they have maybe a large handful of individual nights, or memories or days that are like, really, really special. Definitely, for some of the people on on that yacht, that will be one of the coolest, best, most fun days of their entire life, that they will literally never forget, like, for sure. And so that that's a very powerful thing. And we're, and we're literally just getting started. Now, again, you know, slacker duck pond, I assume that that's not going to recover.

Roy:

I wouldn't count him out.

Jamie:

I wouldn't either, because rule number one says don't count them out. But that was just a specific one that I decided to take a shot at. But there's a lot of profile picture projects, and tons of them. The community I think will just wither away as the price doesn't do anything, and the community doesn't do anything. And the devs don't really do anything.

Roy:

You know, it's one project. So if it makes a comeback, it will be like anything can make a comeback, misfit University.

Jamie:

Oh, yeah, misfits would have been a an even more appropriate one, probably. But yeah, there's going to be a lot of projects like that, that do fizzle out. And so individual profile picture projects are going to run out of steam. But I think as a category there, they're only going to gain steam.

Roy:

Yeah, we're just getting started still like that the amount of people in the world that are going to want an online identity, a community to be a part of a movement, like all this stuff is astronomical.

Jamie:

And they can be they can be so unique. I was talking to Jim about this last night, like I was talking about how on the one end of the spectrum, you have cool cats, which has like a very strong centralized developer. Team, as far as I'm concerned, that has a very specific vision. And then on the other end of the spectrum, you have these cryptoads, where it's totally decentralized, all of the intellectual property is totally open source. And I feel like there's a lot of success that can happen with both, but they're going to be so different. And there's the the the amount of different things that these projects can accomplish, and the ways they can grow. And the ways they can succeed are so varied and numerous. That again, I just want to reiterate, I think that profile picture projects are gaining a ton of steam, and will only continue to do so overall, again, individually, lots of them are run out of steam, and people will stop caring about them permanently. But overall, these communities are only going to get bigger and more powerful and more interesting.

Roy:

Yeah. And we're we're still like, so many of the best ones haven't even been invented yet before about the ideas, haven't for sure. It's like every month, it seems like we go through a new phase where this new thing comes out and people are like, Hey, what's this and every project copies it like Like, we had companions, sort of everyone's copying the body of your club with the dogs. And then we have dowels. And you'll tokens now where everyone is copying the cyber cons. And, you know, we've had maybe five other things that everyone started copying airdrops of things. And

Jamie:

yeah. And another thing I want to mention is like, when you look at what we brought up earlier, where Damien Hirst, and now this other project, say, Hey, if you were in this project, you are now advantaged on some degree in this new project we're doing the way that all this stuff is so easy to track, who owns it, and when they owned it, and have it be all interoperable and airdrops and all of that. It just creates so many interesting possibilities for these things. Yeah, it's possible to be more of that. Yeah.

Roy:

And there will for sure, be more of that. And, yeah, it's, it's awesome. And if he's awesome.

Jamie:

Yeah, they are. I do. I want to go back to another thing, though. I do think, in general, for this type of project, where we'll say, we'll call him profile picture projects. And, you know, with the caveat that we know that these, these teams, and these owners are building a lot more with that as the just the starting layer, I think people do need to move away from the idea that this NFT, if I own it, without me providing any value to the community, will make me money without me having to sell the NFT I think that that idea is getting too ingrained in people's heads, and is not a good thing for the space or for the communities that they're in, or for the developers who are actually trying to make cool, interesting new shit. I think if we can move away from that idea, then then these things are going to really be only gaining steam and becoming more interesting. Yeah,

Roy:

I think we're sort of at that

Jamie:

will drive the value of them, when you eventually do decide to sell something, because? Because what what makes something valuable to me? Is it actually being interesting and valuable and fun and compelling. Not that it has some ERC 20 token? Yeah,

Roy:

I think we already are moving away from the community necessarily loving these tokens that is hold down totals open the scandal thing. Yes. Scary for sure. Yes. Good some people and make people not just FOMO into every project because they have a token. Yeah. Yeah. And it

Jamie:

also I think, becomes a thing where, like, when the ninth one does, it kind of pulls the veil off the first, second and third one to where if the token isn't actually providing value? You go? Well, well, hold on, actually, what is the difference between that this one and that one? Yeah. And you know, like, for instance, and I don't know about most of these, but the cybercom is one, you are using it to breed to make these cyber Kong the exes maybe, or baby coins or something that have legitimate value in the marketplace. So you go okay, that's, that's one thing. But excuse me. You know, ones were there. It literally it's just like, well, we have a liquidity pool on uniswap for it. So I don't know, it's got value there. Right. Yeah, that's, that that's kind of annoying and stupid to me. Yeah, I think counter to what will make projects? Yeah,

Roy:

I think a lot of them are saying, Ah, we have a liquidity please Rob, you get these tokens. And in the future, you'll be able to re breed and get new NFT's and it's like, well, sure, you can get a new T but why would anyone pay good money for that one? Like it's, it's just sort of this.

Jamie:

Yeah, and other projects are already air dropping new FTEs for you without having to do that. Yeah. And if the functionality is not there to later why not maybe make the token later when you have the functionality both out? Yeah,

Roy:

I mean, for sure. A lot of people are putting the cart before the horse.

Jamie:

I think we answered that pretty thoroughly though.

Roy:

Yep. Ah, Scott shallow says who was the better poker player? That one is easy. That was me.

Jamie:

That that is not true.

Roy:

Yeah, it depends, right.

Jamie:

I would say a very accurate and easy answer would definitely be it depends unquestioned. Let's let's start with what's for sure. Right? You're definitely a better Pot Limit Omaha player than me. And I was definitely a better no limit Hold'em player than you. I think we can say those confidently.

Roy:

Yes. Except maybe the early days. I was better than you know, in Hold'em

Jamie:

well. Maybe I was better than you at Parliament Omaha.

Roy:

I guess I guess maybe Yeah, but like

Jamie:

the 50 Big one maximum games on On Party Poker back in the day, that was my fucking main game for a while. I remember when back when Jonas monk was was telling us all how to play yeah. No, but seriously, uh, I don't want to use this podcast hurt my best friend Roy's feelings, but I am definitely it says who was but I'll also say currently am a better poker player than you? And was

Roy:

I would say probably currently you are because you still play sometimes. And I don't. So

Jamie:

it's laughable. I'm here, here's something. I'll say. That's completely serious. I think I genuinely think I was a better poker player than you. And you are a better professional poker player than me.

Roy:

I would probably agree with that. If I'm being really honest, I would say that you were the better poker player.

Jamie:

And you're definitely better at doing it professionally. Yeah.

Roy:

Well, how? Well set would mature. Yeah. amicable works. Yeah, your ability to sort of just think about games, especially new games that others hadn't. Like, I was really good at reading articles on poker, reading books, watching videos, taking all that information, distilling it, and grinding and and making good decisions. And yeah,

Jamie:

you played a lot of poker. Yeah. You were really

Roy:

good at, hey, here, the rules of poker. Now be good. Right, or what to do, basically,

Jamie:

and sort of, I felt like I was able to see what people thought was correct. And figure out why there was something better that they could be doing, and how I could sort of exploit that, that mistake. And then it seemed to turn out that you know, 10 months down the road or whatever, over and over again, something that I had suspected was off about the current metagame would would come into fashion. Like I remember, you know, I started mostly limit Hold'em and then moved over to no limit Hold'em. And when I got into no limit Hold'em, it seemed like the doctrine was so thoroughly that if you raise before the flop and get three bet, like, you got to fold almost fucking everything. And it did not seem like that was actually what you should be doing. Especially, you know, when you were cut off or button or something, and it was a blind three betting you. And so I was just defending against those three bets a lot wider than the average professional was at the time. And then, and then that ended up being much more common practice later on.

Roy:

Yeah, you would also three bet and just generally be a lot more aggressive. I remember in like 2006, maybe 2007, we were a part of this online forum called bet the pot. And people would post sort of hand histories. So like, the analysis of the hand that they played, and asked for feedback and thoughts and strategy tips and stuff, and the hands that you're posting. You post them and all the responses to be like, holy crap, that's aggressive. Wow. And so I'm making an aggressive move. In another hand, they're like, well, that's a Jamie type of thing to do. And it turns out that fast forward eight years, and the correct play was to be 10 times more aggressive than you were being then. Right. Yeah, it's like, well, he's triple barreling, and he doesn't have a hand what, what, what, that's maths.

Jamie:

One other thing that I think helped me in poker a lot. And I don't know how much other people found it. But like, there was a lot of situations where, like, specifically, in a river decision, somebody would have a marginal hand. And, you know, they get bent into and they're there, they have their marginal hand, and immediately they go, Okay, do I call? Or do I fold? Do I call or do I fold? But those are not your only possibilities. And in a poker hand, unless, of course, it was an all in bet. But most of the time, it's not. And you also have the option of raising. And I think I was generally good at not just falling into the rope, do I do this or that when you actually have more options? Because, you know, if you have a marginal hand in a situation like that, you're thinking, Okay, do I fold because it's too marginal? Or do I call because I think they're bluffing just enough? That that's sort of an easy thing for your brain to immediately jump to, but possibly, if you're thinking about the concept of calling because you think they're bluffing enough or just don't have that strong of stuff. It's possible if you go back and look at the way the hand played out, and what types of hands you should have for is what types of hands they should have that you could actually credibly Republic with your marginal hand, and then blow them off of, you know, all of their bluffs, plus some hands that they were maybe value betting, like that happened to be a little bit better than what you were thinking of calling with.

Roy:

No, 100%. Correct. You were definitely way ahead of the curve, a lot of things. But then you'd play three hours a week of poker and

Jamie:

yeah, I played very little, which was a bummer. Yeah, I could have made a lot more money if I if I played longer hours, for sure. Yeah. But he we got. I had a lot of fun doing other stuff during that time, too, though. So it's like, I developed a personality and interests and stuff like that, which weren't too well. Okay, you want to move on to the next one drill? S S said Don't forget to mention at crypto foxes NFT.

Roy:

Now, for fun. Yeah, he's

Jamie:

just he's just trying to get us to mention a project that he's a part of, I guess. Yeah. But I minted three of the v2 ones. And they seem so worth nothing for the longest time that I actually had them hidden on my open sea wallet until like a week ago when they started doing something again recently. And then I think I sold one of my three so far.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, it's another one of those projects, which it was basically dead for the longest time. And then people dug it up. And we're like, Hey, what's this project? And now let's just invoke?

Jamie:

Yeah. And that was that was actually one of the specific instances of pixel art early in my NFT career where I went, I don't enjoy the look of this. I felt I felt like I shouldn't be minting it as I was nothing it but it was just like, exciting to be finding new projects at the time. Yeah. And I was thinking, well, maybe other people like it, but I really, it was not something that really appealed to me. And so I did it. And the market didn't seem to care about him. And I hit him and moved on with my life. But and then I guess now that people are interested again,

Roy:

I guess it's happening a lot lately. Ah, all right. We mentioned cryptic boxes, Lopez says, What's your opinion on the price of NF T's if the eth USD price spikes? Do they go with it or down to compensate?

Jamie:

We've seen a couple of examples. I think already have it doing both. So I think it's, it's not really something that we can say. That's my basic opinion on it is that already, I've only been doing this for seven months or something like that. And I've seen F prices go up sharply, where NFT prices continued to do so as well. And I've seen F prices go up sharply while NFT prices prices were plummeting in ES terms. Yeah, I've seen both.

Roy:

We basically don't have enough information. We haven't a year we've seen both. We don't know what's going to happen in the future. I think if f goes like really crazy, like we see 10k eth. Then, yes, NFC prices will likely go down in eth terms to compensate a bit. But sure, I'm,

Jamie:

I'm less confident of that than you. But I definitely hear people say that a lot. And I'm also curious when you're saying that, like, what timeframe? are you assuming that we're hitting this 10k? In?

Roy:

Maybe the next six months? Yeah. Okay. Because, yeah, maybe. And because and you think someone new to NFT's who's hearing about them is like, Hey, I would like to visit NFT's. And they're converting fiat currency to eth. It's just, it's going to get them so much late. I

Jamie:

think they're already having that, oh, they're they're already finding that. And so they're all people coming in the people that are coming into NFT's. Now. I think they're either rich, or they're looking to meet new projects that can possibly be, you know, the next big thing. And then, you know, theoretically doing some of that on non s chains as well. Here's what I'll say about this specific question. I think what I'm finding is that my theory was that as eth prices went up, the people that were involved in NFT's would feel in be more rich. So an eth two prices would not get hurt from that. But what I think I've been seeing lately, is that when f prices go up, it's increasing defi activity, which is jacking up gas prices, which is hurting for prices, especially in lower value projects.

Roy:

Yeah, that's a really good point. We've definitely seen, like if eth prices spike, like sharply in the short term, then defi activity definitely goes up. If it's more of like a gradual increase. It's harder to say, but yeah, I think there's definitely going to be an element of that. Just as generally more people get involved in NFT's and d phi and the theorem network until eth 2.0 and other roll up solutions and layer twos although we are seeing more of that now but more people using arbitrary and immutable X has had a few drop. Yeah, yeah.

Jamie:

And and even like Matic is I feel like, you know, legitimate projects are using it now.

Roy:

Yeah, cool. Can't wait on it. Right, right. Chicken derbies at Ron, they've been around for a while. Yeah. All right. Next question.

Jamie:

Hippie Mama says, how much of a person's crypto portfolio should they allocate into NFT's? And then they followed it up with our floor prices, one's better than the more rare ones in terms of liquidity?

Roy:

Well, I think the second one is we can answer very quickly and full price for entities that are just almost always gonna be better in terms of liquidity,

Jamie:

just by definition. Yeah. They're more liquid for sure. Yeah.

Roy:

It's especially when the market is like, not hot. And not a lot of people are looking at that particular collection or anaphase. It's very difficult to get, quote, unquote, fair market value for a rare NFT.

Jamie:

It's also more liquid in the sense that like, if if you're going to invest X dollars, and it's either going to be in one rare one, or several floor ones, the floor ones even beyond how hard it is to get fair price, maybe for the rare one, you can you can liquefy a portion of your assets when you have seven floor ones. Whereas you have to be all liquid or all illiquid. Basically, if you have one rare one, there's no half measures.

Roy:

Yeah. How much of your portfolio? Should you allocate your energies? What do you think that is a

Jamie:

difficult question. And, you know, we've talked about this sort of thing before where when somebody asks a question like that, I feel like I have eight questions that I want to ask them and get the answers of, before I feel like I can be qualified to give them a valid answer. And so when people are asking me that in, in this format, where it's not a back and forth, I just kind of want to redirect it back at them and give them the types of things that I think they should consider when trying to figure out what is the correct percentage?

Roy:

That's very fair, and probably what I would agree with as well. And, I mean, obviously, we can't give financial advice or anything even close to it as well. So what kinds of things would you think that someone should consider?

Jamie:

Um, their desire to take money out of the crypto portfolio is very relevant to me, because if you feel like you're going to want to be spending some of the money or earnings anytime soon, that makes me want to have a lower percentage of entities in the portfolio? Because they are so much less liquid than our regular coins. That would be a starter. Yep. I'm also just like, what are your goals? Yeah, that's

Roy:

a big one and risk, appetite and all that kind of stuff.

Jamie:

Right? It seems like these days, if you want really sharp risk return situations, it's more in NFT's than it is coins. Whereas if you want something that's more gradual, and a sure thing, you'd probably be better off having less NFT's, and more just in in good coins.

Roy:

Yeah, I would agree with that. It's also just sort of like, it's a very personal thing. When it comes down to like, how much conviction Do you yourself have in NFT, right as a macro concept, and if it's not a lot of conviction, you shouldn't have a significant or perhaps even any of your portfolio in NFT's. But if you the more conviction you have, the more easier it is to sort of justify more percentage of your portfolio into NFT's.

Jamie:

Yeah, I agree with that as well. Yeah, it's a very personal question. That is not really something that we can answer so well, but we can say roughly where we're at, I have way more in NFT's way more in NFT's than I do in non NFT crypto stuff, probably probably at a ratio of close to maybe I have, you know $6 worth of NFT's for every $1 worth of non NFT coins at this point, something like that.

Roy:

Well, I I might be closer to 50 to one, like, I think my crypto portfolio, let me think about it now. Maybe like 25 to one I think,

Jamie:

yeah, I mean, I was probably very close to that until recently where I've started having some math on the sidelines because I'm getting a little bit concerned about this. A tax situation and because I've recently bought some so on some sushi and a lot of home,

Roy:

yeah. Oh, I heard a great thread on earlier today. On Twitter. There's actually a, I think it was both the Twitter thread and like a blog post guy had on his website. Yeah, it was just basically someone were to it. Yeah, well, it's so ohm is a token. It's basically like a

Jamie:

O H M is the name. It's Olympus is the name? Yes.

Roy:

And it's this sort of like a stable ish coin. Basically, they're trying to be this. It's a whole new concept. And it's very complicated to sort of, I can't really distill it. It's not

Jamie:

it's not they're not trying to do a stable coin, but they're trying to be like a reserve currency for crypto space, basically. Yeah. And act sort of as a reserve bank for cryptocurrency and doing basically basically the equivalent of fractional reserve banking. But again, in crypto,

Roy:

yeah. And this article, I read this, basically, this guy who heard about it a while back and just sort of dismissed it and was like, Oh, this is a scam, Ponzi. And now he's come back and said, Hey, I was wrong. And he's done something.

Jamie:

Yeah, that's that's how I felt too, when I first heard about it, it's, it definitely sounds adjacent, at the very least, to just a straight up Ponzi scheme. But then if you don't immediately dismiss it, and keep thinking about it and reading about it. And then also, what can help is comparing it to other coins, I think helps them because it's like, well, yeah, it's inflationary, and you need other people to come in later, with money for it to continue working. But like, that applies to every coin, maybe. And this one actually has assets backing it for at least a percentage of the value. Whereas these other ones have literally nothing other than, you know, if you want to say the computation to secure the blockchain or whatever Acts it but beyond that, this one actually has assets in a treasury that are get imparting some value to the the trading price of the coin.

Roy:

Yeah. And I mean, to give some perspective of how scam and Ponzi like it sound, it sounded back in April, when I first got in, it was offering and returning about 120,000% APR. And I mean, now it's still like 7,000%, which is ludicrous. But anyway, we will have a link to some I'll link to that article. And people can do a bit more reading in it. Yeah. All right. We had a q&a.

Jamie:

Oh, that was the last that was the last question. Wow. Okay. Yeah. It's very cute. Right, what is the latest on your one s challenge?

Roy:

My one eth challenge is going well.

Jamie:

Either. Yeah. If I say ether, but then I tend to say F

Roy:

Yeah, I know. And our listeners know,

Jamie:

I know you do. I know they do.

Roy:

It's been a really good week for the challenge. And

Jamie:

last week within the last week was good, too. So that sounds really good. Yeah. So

Roy:

I'll try and remember everything that sort of happened or the big picture stuff. The one of the biggest things was, well,

Jamie:

why don't you start us off with about where you were? Last episode?

Roy:

Okay, I think, actually, I can let me just scroll back. I can find out.

Jamie:

I remember you having about three points something small worth? Like? That's the last I remember. It might

Roy:

have I think it might have been like two and a half. But it's possible. It was three I think it

Jamie:

was just like 3.1 or something. Yeah.

Roy:

Anyway, we're at about 4.7 Though, in okay, maybe depending because this is sort of floor value. And I think I have some rarer ones. Right. Right. So yeah, I mean, it's been a fantastic week, and a lot of it is probably down to two projects. The first is the dowel turtles which we mentioned earlier. I mean two three of them on this wallet and I got some rare ones and so one of them for point five five and another one for point three it's like that's just immediately a massive obviously going to the project and the wallet considering I mentioned very very little I'm stuck with one more now which I can't trade I'm not entirely sure renderable What's that?

Jamie:

How about going to wearable? Yeah, that's possible.

Roy:

They the team came out with something called jail turtles so for every doubt total you have you can min jail total loss. I think they weren't minting for very much but it was funny and they were going for a lot at one point. And they're sort of still in talks with open see they just Some of the wording on their website and roadmap and stuff. So there's potential that they will get relisted and unbanned. And like they have a really strong community basically that a lot of people have rallied behind them. So this is a part for that one. The other big project was I minted four of these fly frogs. And I think they were point or they were point oh, four, five to mint, but gas was kind of expensive at the time. So I think my effective cost for each of them was around point five. So point oh, five, sorry. So point two in total for the floor. And now the floor for an individual one is like around that point. 2.22. So that is another massive win basically a point six or so profit. I've still got them so I haven't realized it. But I'm decently bullish on these fly frogs. They

Jamie:

they're all pretty flourish years.

Roy:

I actually haven't checked. I think that they are I think I checked at the time but my thinking was basically that I didn't really want to sell anytime soon because it really does seem like there's a lot of hype around them. A lot of people talking about him buying in them influences liking them. And they they sort of rapidly went up to a floor of around point one five points.

Jamie:

I was actually telling you a couple hours ago that I was thinking about buying some or saying that they were close to something that I would want to buy and then I got a little bit of a spoiler alert of this segment. Because you're you're saying something about having them in here. You don't normally I go into this segment knowing nothing about what happened in the week for it which is always fun for me but I got a little bit of a sneak preview this time around

Roy:

Yeah, yeah, I mean it's been a good week I mean to the few other things nothing crazy interesting some NFT worlds which I probably could have sold for a good result the

Jamie:

thing where it's like you have oil or whatever Yeah, so there's like Minecraft

Roy:

plots and they can I haven't looked too much into them but that you can like interact with Minecraft and yeah, there were freedom in but there was an absurd Ghassoul so they ended up costing like point one five or something each and I think they're around or

Jamie:

free but it costs point one five you said yes, yes.

Roy:

Yes. Yeah. Which is kind of absurd. Yeah, I mean some pixel beasts and some sores dream worlds aboard an ethereal and Yeah, nothing has done excellently or terribly aside from the the turtles and frogs. And I still have a bunch of stuff like previous to that that I bought and has just sort of been not doing much but I guess it sort of goes back to real one where I'm I check in on them the team still building things and do Oh, I bought a Roboto

Jamie:

Oh, yeah,

Roy:

that's a big deal. I just went down to the bottom my wallet Yeah, that's something huge so that was the largest purchase by far on my wallet. I paid point nine two for one when my wallet was worth around 4.5 And I think I remember last week you were saying something because I was talking about wanting one and buying one and you said well it might make sense if your wallets around for eth to bid points. Yeah. And you know I'm not about that bidding life not because anything wrong with it is fantastic and you should do it but just because of time saving and stuff i i tend to mock it by and I saw this one relatively low compared to what the floor had been historically which is one 1.5 Plus and yeah, what its floor is around one again. So it's doing okay, I'm pretty bullish on them in the medium to long term. They've got a really passionate loyal community and creator artist Pablo Stanley, I think is his name. And yeah, that that was a big thing for the challenge this week, but it's been a good week. Excellent. Yeah,

Jamie:

I'm proud of you you're doing well

Roy:

yeah, I'm really happy with how it's going as well. It's I was

Jamie:

scared of how embarrassing this week was second it was going to be after week one but it's going great now

Roy:

Yeah, yeah, it's it's really 10 Turn around then. You know that to be fair, that was

Jamie:

like three days right? It wasn't a week

Roy:

yeah, I think so. Yeah. But it was bad three days I bought it

Jamie:

was not it was not good. And you it was also it wasn't like oh you got unlucky was like oh he's stupid. Yes. Not approaching this correctly at all.

Roy:

i If you look at like so in my Discord. Every day I write like a recap and update. And by like day three, or day four. I title them all and my day for update his mistakes were made. Basically only a few days in and I already think I've made a few mistakes. And then I'll list out three mistakes I made in my first four days. And yeah, it was Just a rocky start. I basically was on vacation came back, I was super excited to start it. But like, I was just not interested the market, I wasn't really thinking straight and just yet made mistakes, but have thankfully turned it around. And yeah, it's going well. So that's cool. What is going on with Uri annual abstract for the day project?

Jamie:

What's going on with me, um, I've just been creating one abstract piece of day still, but I will say I felt really, really good about the stuff that I made this week. I'm really good about maybe four of them, which feels good because I don't you know, I, I will keep going every day until I have something that I feel okay. minting and Okay, selling. But some of them it's, it's still feels a lot more difficult. And like, I'm not particularly proud of it. But I know, you know, it's still it looks fine to me, and artists objective and other people like it, that sort of thing. But this week, I made some stuff that I really felt fucking great about. And so I just, I'm excited at my continued growth in that. Now I'm continuing to make ones that look different to what I've made before but are still interesting, and I'm and I'm just really exploring new stuff and fucking having fun making stuff that I like.

Roy:

Yeah, I I love day one a nine after Levine.

Jamie:

I love that one, too. I was really really happy with that one. Yeah,

Roy:

it looks looks excellent. And day. 114 is also really really cool.

Jamie:

Yeah, that was today. I'm very happy with that one as well. I'd like to delete. Oh, yeah. I like day. 111. Two, it's maybe a little bit more whimsical and, and simple or something. But I really like that as well.

Roy:

Jellyfish. I like 12 as well. Yeah, you too.

Jamie:

I've actually been pretty happy with this.

Roy:

Who's this guy? He's the one you linked to before he's bought all these ones that I really love.

Jamie:

Yeah, he's got a lot of a lot of the pieces of mine that I think are the best. I don't know who he is. Yeah. But yeah, sort of recently, I went through my whole collection. And basically it was kind of looking at it in like chunks of 10 days. And it's just sort of interesting to see where I feel like I start hitting my stride. And then where I feel like, Oh, I was really, really making good stuff consistently multiple days in a row in that range. And then a couple days where I go, I felt like I was really struggling to produce stuff. But right now I feel like I'm in one of those. One of those times when I'm just really making a lot of stuff that I feel good about and a lot of stuff that is sort of revealing, maybe a new style to me that I can kind of keep going back to and go oh, let me make something like that. Let me keep exploring that idea. Like day 114. Today, for instance. I've never made something that looked pixelated like that at all. Yeah. And I just I really liked it. And it was sort of it reminded me a little bit of day 50 I believe it was the dollar. I

Roy:

love that one like like

Jamie:

fractals? Yeah, yeah, yeah. Where it was something where I had a start. And I just kind of kept doing more and more stuff to what I already had, and taking pieces of it and shrinking them and growing them and warping them and just kind of trying because I had put in so much effort until I made something that I actually ended up liking. Yeah. And so that's always sort of an interesting thing to me, because a lot of times, I'll, I'll work on something for 40 minutes, and then just throw it away entirely. Whereas other times, I'll go yeah, there's, there's something a little bit here that if I kind of just keep adjusting it, maybe it's gonna it's gonna work out well,

Roy:

you know, I'm scrolling through now. And it's cool to see sort of your creative progress or process where there'll be strings of days where you do sort of similar things and building on one another and then you move to something else and then later on, you go back to something you've

Jamie:

used before. It also happens with palettes a lot where I'll I'll find some colors that I really liked together and then maybe use them for two days in a row or you know, three out of seven days or something. Yeah, definitely. And then maybe I'll get kind of bored with them and move on.

Roy:

This is very cool. One of my day day one, the first one shouldn't be worth a million dollars one day I would love it I would love that too. Yeah. Yeah. Well, I mean, it's, it's worth I earned it right? It's worth what I say, oh, yeah,

Jamie:

the provenance just because it's on something you that

Roy:

but more respectable. If someone else wants to buy it, I could just say I'm not selling it for under X. Oh, right. Right. Yeah. Price.

Jamie:

It that's that's kind of the magic of NFT's that was in 652, nines, whole thread about it. So like, you can't, you can't just go to somebody else and buy their day one of abstract of the day, because you got the only fucking one in existence. Yep. So that the richest person in the world can't buy it as long as you decided not to sell it, which is an amazing thing about these NFT's.

Roy:

Yeah. Anything else in your abstract today? Project? No, I'm,

Jamie:

I'm happy to just talk about how I'm really happy with what I've created lately.

Roy:

Yeah, very cool. I wanted to talk a bit about my new project that it's sort of coming more to fruition. So I am planning to release my own NFT and ft project, it will basically be a membership token, slash utility token. Other people have done it. It's not exactly a new concept. But I felt like I would love to release an NFT on my own for a while, just because it's very cool, exciting, interesting, fun. But I didn't really just want to do it. For the sake of doing it. I wanted to find out, figure out a way to do it, that ideally create value for the people who are buying it and myself and just the whole space and a community. And so I came up with this, why didn't come up with this, I decided upon this concept of a membership token and

Jamie:

came up with it, then.

Roy:

eight eight has done it Metaverse headquarters has done.

Jamie:

So we're saying okay, yeah, people

Roy:

have done sort of thing where you needed to get into the discord, or if you have, airdrops and stuff like that. So it's definitely number four, I, my Discord will, most of it will still be free and open for anyone. But having the NFT will basically get you access to a couple of private channels, where I sort of intend to post more content, because I think I mean, I'm not an artist, I'm not a game designer, I'm not a developer program. I mean, those things I can't really do. But what I have been able to do is provide content and you know, write articles use my brain, think about the space. And that's sort of where I see my value coming from. So I'll probably post things like daily market updates, or research on upcoming projects. And and that's one aspect of the value, I'll probably give people like early access to my newsletter. And beyond that, find other ways to give value to the community. I think just having this private discord and community of like minded people. With the addition of some of my content, hopefully people will find that valuable and be one want to be a part of it. And yeah, so I mean, I'm probably still a month out from actually releasing the thing, because, you know, smart contracts take time to be coded and programmed and all that kind of stuff, but it's definitely something I'm pretty excited about to be working on as well.

Jamie:

That's very cool. Yeah, we had talked maybe a couple weeks ago, we were talking about my abstract of the day project, how it's just, it's fun in the NFT space to be doing all of the things, you

Roy:

know, yeah.

Jamie:

You can be a buyer, a seller, a collector. And now you're kind of doing that, that last sort of thing and making your own NFT's.

Roy:

Yeah, being creative. And, and again, to

Jamie:

like, you know, you're talking about how you're not an artist, and so many people, I think, are still just associating NFT's with picture files. But that's not what it is, you know, that's just a very easy user interface that some of them are, but and almost anybody can provide something valuable to other people. And then we can have that value, tracked, own traded, etc, within NFT. Yeah. And you you have shown categorically, that might not be the right word, like you have shown something way that you provide great useful information and content to people in the NFT space. And this is sort of just a way for you to further that in an even more web 3.0 native way.

Roy:

Yeah, like a lot of people have said, why don't you start charging for your newsletter, and you know, I would gladly pay for it and it's set up on substack you can very easily, you know, create an account with us. stripe and say, hey, I want to charge five or $10 a month for this right. And I'm sure people will pay for it. But a, I don't love the idea of having a gated fully and be, we're in the NFT space, it just makes way more sense to try and do it right. Via NFT's or web3, and

Jamie:

I think substack is gonna charge you 10%. And then yeah, exactly. Charge you one and a half percent.

Roy:

Yeah. Whereas, yeah, it's not you

Jamie:

got, you can just have open See, charge you two and a half percent and then also get royalties on this thing that you know, nobody can sell their newsletter subscription to you in web two point out. Whereas the way you're doing it here, they kind of they need to or want to. Yeah,

Roy:

and, yeah, it's just very cool and exciting. And so, a big part of, I guess the impetus for why I'm looking into it more now, and why I'm so excited about it is that I don't really want slash love the idea of just doing what I'm doing now, for that much longer, which is buying, selling, trading, flipping NFT's I started, it's not really scalable. So if you get to a certain point, where you just can't like, nowadays, um, if I'm like really lucky collection, I'll by 2050 of the entities and the amount of time it takes to go yeah, check the rarities listed for sale. Like it just doesn't make sense. I would rather instead of spending my time buying and selling, I could create content, and work with advise projects on you know, what they can do to make their project more successful, made the whole space more successful, and just sort of writing a picture macro level stuff. And yeah, it's sort of almost like the next step, like natural evolution, I think in this space, at least for me. So

Jamie:

yeah, we need positive ambassadors in the space and it seems like this, this might be a good way for you to further your, your theoretical position as well.

Roy:

Hopefully, fingers crossed, I can figure out like all the logistics, but I'm getting there.

Jamie:

Yeah, and we'll probably do some sort of fun giveaway for listeners where you'll give away some of them or something.

Roy:

Yeah, absolutely. I plan on giving away quite a lot and making the price quite affordable. And making it accessible to pretty much anyone who wants one like not there won't be like a gas war and stuff like that. Yeah, anyway, more details to come later when it's figured out and more firmed. Very cool. Yep. I think that was that was it? That's for sure.

Jamie:

Yep. This has been episode 10 of Two Bored Apes. Thanks for listening. Thanks

Intro:

Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh