Two Bored Apes - NFT Podcast

Episode 11 - Coinbase's NFT Marketplace, Tyler Hobbe's Next Drop, and More

October 19, 2021 Two Bored Apes
Two Bored Apes - NFT Podcast
Episode 11 - Coinbase's NFT Marketplace, Tyler Hobbe's Next Drop, and More
Show Notes Transcript

On Episode 11 of Two Bored Apes, Jaime and Roy break down the breaking news of Coinbase announcing their upcoming NFT marketplace. They talk about Tyler Hobbe's next drop with an astronomical starting price, and they of course answer many twitter questions. In a Two Bored Apes first they may also agree on the correct pronunciation of a word!

TIMESTAMPS

1:20 News of the Week
26:11 Bored Apes Yacht Club
36:34 Art Blocks
58:33 Twitter Q&A
1:39:12 Abstract of the Day + 1 Eth Challenge

Show Notes:

Sunblocks

Tyler Hobbs New Drop

Big Mutant Sale
Big Mutant Sale 2
Big Ape Sale

Yuga Labs signs with Guy Oseary

Eponym (AI Art NFT Project)

Ohm Article

Coinbase NFT Marketplace Announcement

Shoez NFT

Abstract of the Day

1 Eth Challenge Wallet

Jamie:

The hosts have Two Bored Apes are not registered investment advisors. The podcast is for entertainment and informational purposes only. Nothing said on it should be construed as investment advice. On this week's episode of Two Bored Apes. We talked about Coinbase announcing that they're going to have an NFT marketplace. We talked about a few big IP sales as well as you Ugalabs signing with a talent manager. We talked about Tyler Hobbes announcing his playground drop on Artblocks. We talk about the new website and all the projects being separated out on OpenSea. Then we take questions on Twitter and provide answers and as per usual, we give an update on Roy's 1 eth challenge, my abstract of the day project and Roy's upcoming NFT access to it

Intro:

Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh

Jamie:

Welcome to Episode 11 of Two Bored Apes. I'm your host Jamie and I'm here with my friend and co host Roy. Roy, how are you doing?

Roy:

I'm very good. I was just finishing a piece of apple fly... apple pie flavored chocolate. Not Apple fly. I'm very well.

Jamie:

Very professional. This chow of chocolate in your mouth. Right? It's turning on

Roy:

I thought I thought I had a little more time like you do a little more the intro? Yes. You know

Jamie:

you're pulling me here. Yeah. I'm well

Roy:

how are you ?

Jamie:

How am I?

Roy:

Yeah, how are you?

Jamie:

I'm good. I'm just getting over being exorbitantly full as we talked about earlier. It seems like a person again.

Roy:

Every time before we podcast, one of the two of us has just recently had a big meal or his phone rings from

Jamie:

way before though. Like this was hours ago. But it was a food truck festival and I just went crazy.

Roy:

Would you have?

Jamie:

what did I not have? Probably a shorter list. But I had a lobster? Well, I had part of let's say that because there was four of us. And we did a lot of splitting. But had we had a lobster roll. A brisket quesadilla, fried chicken, ribs. French fries, a Jamaican beef patty. And some other stuff. Oh boy. I can't think of the other things without taking too long. But yeah, there was there was a lot. And it's all very heavy food.

Roy:

Yeah. Sounds delicious.

Jamie:

Was a fun time though. Yeah, it was good. It was it was also on Fort Adams, which is where we had my wedding and I don't know if you remember the crazy traffic. The traffic was because they were having this very same food truck festival there.

Roy:

Yes. I remember. Like the trucks that were passing us by on the way to go there. And

Jamie:

yeah, so it was almost like a romantic anniversary. But yeah,

Roy:

very different type of time of year than your wedding.

Jamie:

Yes.

Roy:

Is it not an annual or?

Jamie:

This is my first time going to it. On the day of my wedding was my first time hearing of it. So I don't really know how the schedule normally works.

Roy:

Boy, we got real off topic really quickly.

Jamie:

We did. We did. Yes. Our podcasts about NFTs. Yeah. Well, and random and random stuff.

Roy:

And defi to talk to you.

Jamie:

Maybe later. Let's start with the news of the week though. How about that.

Roy:

Alright, let's jump right into news of the week we we decided that for us. The biggest news of the week is Coinbase has announced their marketplace for NFT's. And

Jamie:

the biggest news of the week for everybody like global not even just in NFT's

Roy:

the biggest thing that happened and yeah, and I will I mean yeah, the biggest thing in NFT's I would say for sure. In crypto, there was some other pretty big news.

Jamie:

We have Bitcoin ETF. Yeah, it's pretty big. So the Coinbase that was also sort of inevitable. Like there's been a slow march towards that happening for a long time. Yeah, I feel like they've been trying to get one. And there's already like Bitcoin trusts the grayscale Bitcoin trust, for instance, which is effectively fairly similar and stuff, whereas this coin base news is like it came out of nowhere, and it's huge.

Roy:

It is really huge. So, I mean, I think most people listening to it know what Coinbase is or who coin bases. They're basically

Jamie:

the second biggest crypto exchange in the world, I believe.

Roy:

Wow. What's first by Nance? Yeah, yeah. Okay. But it's probably the largest in America. Right? Definitely. Yeah. And they basically announced that they're coming out with an NFT marketplace and you could sign up to be on the waitlist to have an account there. And I think they have as of the time of this recording, the 17th of October they have I think around 2 million people signed up And for some perspective, like, optimistic estimates of how many uses open sea has is like 500,000. wallets,

Jamie:

right? Yeah, there is the the thing with the waitlist where if you basically share your link with another email address, you get to jump up in the line a little bit. So people are saying that probably a lot of those Signups are duplicates. But regardless, we we do know that they have about 70 million users on Coinbase. So already, I mean, that is that is so much more than 500,000 It's crazy.

Roy:

Yeah. It's great for NFT Yeah,

Jamie:

it's interesting, too, because they have given us very few details, but it does sort of seem like they might be doing like a whitelisting of specific projects. Rather than having it just be a free for all sort of like open sea sort of is which really it's not but maybe more like wearable or something where you're seeing everybody's all of their ERC 720 ones. It's it's tough to tell, but they definitely have like called out specific projects and stuff like that. Like, for instance, I'm getting slightly off topic here, but show you the sushi NFT marketplace that's coming out at some point. They're definitely starting with like 10 new projects, and I think no other NFT's, and then they're going to kind of slowly grow from there. Whereas it looks like open sea is going to be maybe starting with existing NFT projects, but just not opening it up to all of them.

Roy:

Coinbase you mean?

Jamie:

Yes. What did I say?

Roy:

You said open sea? Yeah, yeah. Yeah.

Unknown:

Which makes some sense. Yeah,

Jamie:

I mean, they're, they're a publicly traded company. So they have a bunch of scrutiny and stuff. So they just, they're gonna do a lot more crossing of T's and dotting of eyes. Given a non traded company, I got it. Right. I think I did it in the wrong order. Maybe. But I said the right things, at least Yeah.

Roy:

Yeah, no, those it's big news. It's exciting. It's we don't know when exactly, it's coming. But they said by the end of the year, so

Jamie:

it does bring me to one of the biggest questions that I tend to have in this space. So we all basically that are here right now agree that we're very early, that more people and more money will come into the NFT space over time, almost for sure. But I often wonder how much of that money ends up flowing to the existing projects, like a lot of us sort of hope, because we already own some of them, versus how much of it is going to flow to, you know, the existing projects that are very small, because they don't necessarily care about the cachet of the projects that like we do, or projects that don't even exist yet. For instance, you know, somebody that's totally, totally agreeing to NFT's. But then say Coinbase has it, they have some money there and they go, Okay, if Coinbase says it's valid, it's valid. Like, there's almost no way that they'll immediately be okay with the concept that a crypto pump costs 400,000, whereas a, you know, insert other profile picture project here costs 250? Like, I'm just I'm very curious to see how much they adopt the same opinions and, you know, market beliefs that us early adopters have? And how much they're kind of carved their own way and, and will be the tail wagging the dog. And we'll have to kind of follow them.

Roy:

Yeah, I think that it's a really interesting thing to think about. I do agree that by and large, most newcomers to the space, will find it difficult to wrap their heads around 1000s of dollars for NFT's let alone you know, six figures. And we'll just tend to navigate towards the cheaper projects. And the newer projects, I think it's just, it's also just like fun to mint and more appealing to mint than necessarily buy on secondary. And secondary is sort of what a lot of people look towards, after they've been in the space for a little while, at least.

Jamie:

Once you find a project that you missed out on at school or something like that, then you go who I would love to get one of those. But until when you're first in the space, you kind of you're kind of looking for cheaper entry points. Generally, if you aren't specifically like told by a friend, hey, you should get into this or whatever buy one of these. You're kind of just exploring, and then you kind of naturally gravitate towards I would think cheaper stuff and stuff that appeals to you rather than what the NFT market at large has already deemed are sort of the winners.

Roy:

Yeah. And we're also seeing that a lot of new people to the space of just navigating towards projects that us in the end have keyspace may not even have heard about or aren't really on our radar. But because of these projects, perhaps advertising on Tik Tok or an Instagram, or in places where the NFT community isn't very vibrant on but the larger community is very vibrant on, you find these projects like the sneaky vampire syndicate sort of popped up out of nowhere very deep within the NFT space new about and then it's just good like a floor between one and two eth. And like almost entirely full of new people to the space. Crypto dads is another pretty good example of a project that has a large user base of people who it's their first NFT. So I think we're going to see more of that. But to get to the bigger picture thing I like while all of us in the space now are kind of hoping that the new money will flow into the projects that we're already invested in, thus increasing their value, what I think's more likely is that they'll just be money flowing into the space. So if they're buying a new, a new meant in the new profile picture project, the people who are launching that project are involved in it, they're they're already in the NFT space. So they're going to get an influx of money and some amount of that money, I think is going to go towards buying crypto punk. Like if you launch if I'm launching a project next month, for example, I expect to raise some amount of money. And I'm already thinking, hey, like, I'm not thinking I'm gonna withdraw this sitting in my bank. I'm like, what other NFT projects can I reinvest into? And things like that? So I think a lot of other projects will be thinking similarly.

Jamie:

Yeah, you know, what else I think is there's, there's sort of a big learning curve, like, you know, we joke about calling NFTs JPEGs, so much, but when you first get into it, you are sort of just seeing that user interface of the picture. Whereas we sort of know at this point that, you know, if you own a Zed horse, or a Genesis cybercom, or aboard a yacht club, it's you're not really just getting this picture, there's so much more to it, about the community and the utility and the access and all that stuff. But it's when you're first exposed to NFT's, it does very much seem like you're buying a picture trial. And so when you're when your frame of reference is that, you know, maybe you can get to the point where you wrap your head around it. But when you do, you're still going to be gravitating towards much cheaper ones and the ones that are already 100,000 Because you're not necessarily knowing about all the other benefits that perhaps made those other ones so much more valuable.

Roy:

Yeah, definitely. In like it talking

Jamie:

about art blocks, specifically, you know, just the whole concept of generative art in how new and growing it's sort of his as a as a way to create art. And the way that the blockchain interacts with it and makes it sort of a a new form of generative art where there's no curation by the artist, once they've already set in motion, the the algorithm and stuff like that, I think, I think that's a very real and valid and valuable thing that will get more popular over time. And these new coin base people will gravitate to it over time. But I don't think that immediately they'll be able to discern why, you know, so many of us think that such and such an artblocks project should be worth five times what this other art project is worth. That to them seems artistically of equal value.

Roy:

Yeah, there are a lot of people like that have been in the NFT space for months, and they still don't really appreciate or understand the value behind or the value that a lot of the rest of us have put on art blocks or generative art,

Jamie:

right, just in in the art space as well to theirs. They're still not fully on board at all.

Roy:

It's just Yeah, it's such a steep learning curve so much to learn so many areas to like, understand this profile picture avatar projects, art, generative art, regular art, gaming, and just Yeah, it's difficult for someone whose full time job is to, like stay on top of 10% of it. So to try and put yourself in the shoes of someone new to the space and imagine how how large a mountain they have to climb to wrap their head around dropping five or six figures on App blocks or an eight or a punk it's, it's it's a lot.

Jamie:

I do love that. Like for instance with art blocks, though. There's so many projects and there's a really, really huge range of artistic outputs and price points that you know, people that are rich and and grasp the concept immediately. Sure they can go in and start buying cadenzas and ringers or whatever. But there's so many factory projects that have price points that you know, for people that are already well off enough to be Investing in cryptocurrencies, you know, which we know by the fact that they have a coin base account. They can go, oh, you know what I like that. And, and we'll have sort of a new round, I think of price discovery in a lot of these projects where these people are coming in fresh. And they don't know that people revere this project and don't care about this project, and all that sort of thing. So I think it'll be interesting to see how a lot of the cheaper projects react to it, I think I think some of them might end up doing really well, as nice entry points for the new newcomers.

Roy:

Yeah, I can definitely see that. And I mean, in a sense, a lot of people who aren't in the space might be able to wrap their head around paying $500, or US dollars in their mind for a piece of art more than, you know, a profile picture, which might not be as appealing to them. Yeah, without blocks prices, where they are right now, I think there's a lot in that point, one ish, eth range, which, you know, as you said, if you're investing in crypto, you have a Coinbase account. It's not, it's not an exorbitant amount of money for most of those people.

Jamie:

Not at all. Yeah. So I also wonder too, like, just from a business standpoint, I think so many of these digital companies are trying to be more social, and I wonder if Coinbase will start doing that. And then, you know, it makes sense, if you're gonna have a marketplace, right? That it will, to some degree, become a bit more social. And then people will, will be more likely to buy into the concept of these profile pictures. Because they'll just be saying, Oh, the person I'm buying this from, has this NFTs or thing that that intuitively makes sense to me. Because they're, you know, you're already on this platform, rather than going, Oh, I'll buy this thing here, and then use it as my profile picture on Instagram or Twitter, that might not make as much sense to them immediately, whereas when you're already on this NFT marketplace, yeah, sure. I'll get this goofy looking frog or whatever, and put it here. That sounds fun. Yeah,

Roy:

no, I definitely can see that as well. It's gonna be really exciting to see what they do and how they do it. And I mean, I think that they're gonna do it very well. They're just such an enormous company with so many resources. Yeah, hopefully they do it well.

Jamie:

Yeah. I think for a while I was kind of, as I was really sort of learning about defy, I was kind of becoming anti Coinbase. Just because it's, it theoretically seems like something that we don't need, because we can do all this stuff, decentralized, just with smart contracts. But you know what, when you're operating in a jurisdiction with laws and stuff, it just seems like we're forced to have a sort of Know Your Customer on ramp and off ramp. And Coinbase is the de facto one in the US. And they don't seem to charge too egregious of fees, or be too incompetent or anything like that, and seem to be pretty, pretty open to what web 3.0 really is, you know, what I mean? I think all the stuff that seems like it's not and is sort of shitty of them, is them just complying with what their lawyers and all that's tells them, they have to do. Like when you when you deposit for instance, there's usually a wait between when you can take that money that you just deposited, and purchase, like Aetherium with for instance, and then send that off to your meta mask wallet. It's like that's a pain. But it's it's highly likely it's not a thing that they're doing just to be dickheads and slow the money from leaving their accounts, you know?

Roy:

Yeah, no, I mean, it does seem like they they get it, they understand, defy and crypto and all of that. And as you said, they're just complying with regulations and laws, because they want to follow the law. And it's it's also a case where the legislators themselves and the regulators sec, themselves haven't delivered a lot of clarity and rulings on Yeah, not at all. What is and what is we touched

Jamie:

on that a little bit last week? Yeah, talking about the Dow turtles and how it kind of trickles down from the top.

Roy:

Yeah. And so they're in definitely a bit of a tricky spot where a lot of the consumers don't like the things they're doing, but they're forced into doing them because of either regulation or lack of clarity regarding the regulation and legislation.

Jamie:

Yeah, so that that kind of brings me to back to the thing I was saying at the beginning where I'm not sure which projects they'll have, but I do sort of think, you know, they might not have the issues that open sea did where they kind of open that can of worms by taking down down turtles and leaving up all these other things. projects that are adjacent, they might, they might be kind of not allowing projects that have that sort of verbiage in their roadmaps and stuff like that, right from the get go. And so they won't have to kind of be hypocritical by stopping this one while maintaining the allowance of this other one, they'll kind of be going right from the jump going, we're only allowing these projects and we're going to try to add as many as we can, per day, but we're going to be real strict about what you can and can't say your project is and does and is for and all that. Yeah, it

Roy:

could end up being similar to when just an ERC 20 token gets listed on there, where it's like a big deal. And the price generally goes up because it's tapped into Oh, yeah.

Jamie:

Oh, I hadn't really thought about that. But that makes a shitload of sense. Yeah. And especially the cheaper ones.

Roy:

Yeah. And it's gonna do wonders for them. But it's sort of like they do have to pass sort of a rigorous test, or

Jamie:

it's also an interesting thing to wear, like, because this is all decentralized. Say, you got labs, for instance, crosses all their T's, and dot all their eyes. Like, if a bunch of IP owners, though, get very explicit about how, you know, just saying things that make it sound like a security, even if the team at the top is not, I wonder how easily projects can get into hot water, even when the bit of centralization that controls it is, is very careful. Just because the community is so crazy, like when you look at like the NFT, shitposting, that happens on Twitter, you know, a lot of that is is going to invite scrutiny, even if it's not totally serious by the person saying it or isn't by anyone that's literally involved in the decision making of of any project whatsoever.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, it's sort of, yeah, it's really out of the hands of the team, to an extent what I mean, as you said, because it's so decentralized, every ape owner could just decide to start their own, like project and have, like, if you have an APO membership into the board at your club to and completely abandon the original owners. And we've seen projects before where the team that founded it, either left or was kicked out. And then a whole new like the community took over the project. And, you know, it's very unlikely to happen in Google Apps case, because everyone loves them, and they've done a great job. But I can definitely see some edge cases where perhaps the team isn't as active or isn't as vocal or as good. And the community members decide to take things into their own hand. And you know, anyone can release in ERC 20 token and drop it to all holders of a NFT collection, and then they can start trading that on uni swap. And then that's all of a sudden, there's potentially a yield generating token for that collection. And it does create all sorts of sketchy issues.

Jamie:

Yeah. Or you can have like an NFT. That's totally aboveboard because of of what the Creator say and stuff. But then, you know, somebody fractionalized is that through one of these many ways of doing that, and then turns the tokens of that single NFT into something that becomes closer to a security. And again, that's totally out of the hands of the creators of the NFT. Project.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, it's out of the hands of the coin base. I mean, they can choose who they want on the platform, and then it's out of the hands of the Yeah, it's just it's going to be an interesting thing to see how they deal with it all.

Jamie:

Yeah, oh, you know, what I actually read sort of an interesting thing on Twitter today that that makes a shitload of sense. They're basically saying that, you know, as we mostly all believe, we're listening to this, that crypto is sort of an existential threat to, you know, the way things have been in terms of countries having total control over money in blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, and how the US dollars the basically the global reserve currency, they were saying that if the US embraces us dollar stable coins, like USDC, and tether, it's so likely to help them maintain their status as the reserve currency, which is just not something that I had thought of, and also seems like something that is so unlikely for them to do because they're more likely to see it as a threat rather than the thing that will save them from the threat.

Roy:

That makes total sense, though. Yeah, and

Jamie:

I had never thought of it but it makes a ton of sense. And I'll probably send some useless tweets to US politicians trying to get them to think about it the right way.

Roy:

Yeah. But yeah, it is interesting how the krypter world has sort of embraced USD as the stable coin of the crypto world.

Jamie:

Yeah, I mean, in that this also goes a little bit back to home, which we were talking about a little bit last week, but they're they're trying to do a much more crypto native diversified decentralized reserve currency that that isn't so pegged to the US dollar, even though right now it's, it's so die heavy.

Roy:

Yeah, um, our what a project we will write, we will link to the article in this week's show notes because we said we were going to last weekend. I don't think we did.

Jamie:

No, we didn't. Yeah, I gotta figure out a way to listen to both of our sound files at the same time. So that way I can I can do that before we have the episode out and get get all the things I wanted to link to.

Roy:

I'm sure there's some program just got to

Jamie:

be away. I did a little bit last week. Yeah. Yeah. It's it's it. It's out there. But I think we've covered this topic well enough for now. Right?

Roy:

I think so. That was the News of the Week. News of the

Jamie:

Week. Right, let's talk about the board API club.

Roy:

I like them.

Jamie:

I'm proud of it too. I'm part of that club.

Roy:

So it's been I guess more of a quiet week. This week. There hasn't been any groundbreaking news or nothing like like roadmap 2.0 or mutants. We had a lot of extraction

Jamie:

from Hugo labs, really, but we did have one piece of pretty big news and then there was three very large sales that are that are worth talking about.

Roy:

Talk to me about the sales because I haven't really been following them. How big were they?

Jamie:

So mochi big brother bought a fork trait with that Robo I can't death by maybe is this that? I think so. Traitor either for 425 eth. And then, yeah, also two different of the M three mutants both sold for 350 ETH A couple days ago as

Roy:

well. Yeah, I do remember that.

Jamie:

The like basically the nuclear waste looking one and then the Swamp Thing. Oh, come on. I really love that Swamp Thing. One. Yeah. Yeah. Electricity. One are my two favorites. Are the demons really good?

Roy:

Yeah, I think the electricity one was my overall favorite.

Jamie:

There's still a couple M three serums around. So there's like there's more of these that we're not even seeing? Yeah, that's a sick, yo.

Roy:

Um, yeah. So

Jamie:

it just got one two, by the way. Just randomly. Yeah. Yeah, we could have just been air dropped and million dollar serum. So crazy. Yeah, that was so much fun. When we were just at that fancy dinner in Barcelona like rubbing our hands together, excitedly hoping to get an M three. When we started. There was only what eight of them in the actual AirDrop. Oh, my God, that was fun. Even though the obviously. Y'all do that division. The odds are not good. But boy, was it fun to hope

Roy:

but they weren't bad. I mean, to get a million dollars effectively. Oh, yeah.

Jamie:

It was fantastic. Yeah. But the there's the chances of collecting any of that at the very low.

Roy:

Instead, we had to be disappointed. There we go like $15,000 free.

Jamie:

Yeah, well, you got an m two also,

Roy:

I didn't get to.

Jamie:

Those were like 18 F for a while.

Roy:

It was crazy. Now they're like what, six, maybe? Seven or

Jamie:

something like that? Yeah. Every once in a while I go oh, boy. Those are those have dropped a lot. Maybe I can get one now for mine. And I look and I go nope. Wait. still way too expensive for me to spend it. But I do eventually want them to have mine. Yeah. It just doesn't make sense to not have the full set. Yeah, I

Roy:

still haven't done mine yet. It makes no sense not to use them. I don't know. I've been lazy

Jamie:

yet. It seems like people are only going to build stuff for mutant holders and not for serum holder. So eventually you just gonna have to do it. I think.

Roy:

Yeah, that there was sort of a project that dropped this week meta sores and like if you had an ape or mutant you could like MIT to for free or something like that.

Jamie:

Is that they're all done though. I missed that chance basically.

Roy:

Yeah, I missed the two most of us missed it. But the metaphors have a floor of like points. I think pizza checked.

Jamie:

People were talking sort of about missing these opportunities and like let's let's get a community sourced

Roy:

just recently I tweeted that out.

Jamie:

Oh, bragging but let's let's get people well, quiz I think I saw other people saying yes, equate the same thing. I'm not I'm not sure. But regardless that we need, we need a place to all go to to kind of just see all these different projects that are whitelisting and stuff like that for the for various projects. Yeah, the Kryptos had a similar thing as well.

Roy:

Yeah, I just minted my crypt fly or fly. I don't even know what it's called. Because I saw someone else tweet about it. Crypto flies. And yeah, I mean, do you have a toad? I have a droid. Okay, I didn't know that. I got one when they were true or three eth. And just because like, all the crazy rich people on Twitter, were just

Jamie:

yeah, that was one that I feel like I totally saw coming. But I just the art didn't appeal to me at all. So I couldn't pull the trigger. But it seemed like all the people that are talking about this on Twitter now means the price of this is for sure going up.

Roy:

Yeah. Yeah. You get all the like the crypto punks and the Yeah.

Jamie:

Like, even like the specific punks that were into it seemed seemed like the right ones. To me. There's, there's a few that I just I really feel like I respect and think they're more forward thinking than a lot of the other ones. So yeah, but regardless, you know, sometimes that stuff does not work out. Especially if, if I had come to that conclusion when they were 14 or whatever. Yeah, obviously that would not be looking good right now.

Roy:

noop I think they're down around six or seven. Yeah, that sounds right. Anyway, this is the border your clubs segment. What else happened this week, there was some news. They got they got like a an agent. So what happened?

Jamie:

You go ABS signed with Gary Oh, Surrey, who's a founder of the media manager company called Maverick I guess. And they're the firm represents Britney Spears, Madonna, the weekend, Dojo cat a lot of a lot of big names.

Roy:

And now they represent eucalypts.

Jamie:

Boy, right. And I guess I read a thing about him. Earlier in the week after I heard this, and I guess he's he was kind of hooked up with Ashton Kutcher in some way. And they were investors maybe in open sea or Coinbase really early. And he just he kind of found and believed in crypto and NFT's pretty early, and now he's signed on with them. So that's pretty cool.

Roy:

Yeah, that's sort of a little bit

Jamie:

some people on Twitter being sort of upset or confused about it to where like. So specifically, what we have as an owner of an ape is non exclusive, full commercial rights to the image of our individual ape, which basically means that yoga labs can also use it. And I think some people thought that yoga labs could not use your apes image without your explicit permission. Just because they they thought that their own individual for full merchandising rights was exclusive, whereas it's not exclusive. And so they're going well, like, Why does you go ABS need representation or whatever they what they need is to ask us for permission. And so they're they're sort of not liking the idea that theoretically UGL apps can profit and monetize from apes that us as individual ape owners own that Google Apps no longer owns. And I'm curious if they will UGL ABS being they will, you know, in roadmap 2.0, they announced this dow. So I wonder if they'll do some sort of thing where if you become a part of the Dow, you're basically consenting to have your ape used in the sorts of deals that that they get with grocery and will somehow be compensated for it, rather than just totally going around the individual owners, which they have the rights to do.

Roy:

Interesting. I hadn't seen any of that sort of backlash, but it does make some sense that people not thrilled with that idea. Especially if they had the misconception of

Jamie:

what yeah, it all just basically comes from not understanding what you had. Yeah, and it also sort of doesn't. I mean, like if you are trying to build up your ape as some sort of commercial entity, a giant company with a big manager also building up that eight, but it seems like it only ought to do good for you unless you're going like I'm selling these wallets with AIDS image and then you go abs, specifically goes overselling wallets with that apes image or something like yeah, no, it ought to only help you if you have any shred of entrepreneurial spirit and creativity. Yeah, for sure. And that's, that's neglecting the fact that they may explicitly sort of wrap the individual owners into it somehow with the Dow or whatever.

Roy:

Yeah, I think that generally they would probably want to get in The original owners consent and involvement and reward them somehow. But I mean, even if they don't legally have to just yeah, cool thing that they would want.

Jamie:

They're also there. There's 10,000 of them. So if a handful of people with floor rapes don't want to give it to them, okay. There are plenty of owners that would be happy to let them do it for nothing or very little, I'm sure.

Roy:

Yeah. They want to use my

Jamie:

dirt for exactly yeah, like, fine.

Roy:

I'd love to see my API tocotrienol around.

Jamie:

Oh, my gosh, I would I would I really well, we already talked about my dreams for togo as being used to make some sort of great thing that that tells us these fascinating stories from ancient Rome. But yeah, yeah, that's it. That's another topic for another day.

Roy:

Anything else happened with the football club this week? I'm sure there was, but

Jamie:

I'm sure it did. But those are those are the two big things that I noticed.

Roy:

Yeah, I can't really think of anything else. Nice, short segment.

Jamie:

Wasn't that short? Was it it was longer than we thought it would be?

Roy:

Yeah. When we were planning the episode, we were like, is it just going to be bought at your club segment? You still bullish? Yep. You still bullish? Yep.

Jamie:

All right. though. I, and I only thought of those three big sales. But then while we were doing a little bit more, I was like, oh, yeah, they sign with that guy too.

Roy:

Yeah. Well, are you still bullish?

Jamie:

I am still bullish. Yes. Me too. For a peon. Right, what's your favorite platform for generative art?

Roy:

On Aetherium, Solana everywhere.

Jamie:

How about just in the world in the universe in the union, all human endeavors?

Roy:

I gotta go without block stream.

Jamie:

I got our blocks. Me too. Let's talk about our blocks.

Roy:

All right. There's a new website I have. In my

Jamie:

year in my notes here, I have three things, the new websites, one of them, let's talk, let's talk about the new website. Okay.

Roy:

They there's a website. Yeah, there's a new website, they launched it as like a beta, they had

Jamie:

a beta beta for a while beta. We've done this before. It's beta.

Roy:

They, they had that for a while. And then I guess this week, they just made the they stopped the beta version. And if you go to our blocks that IO, it goes to the the new website now,

Jamie:

right. And there's some other URL you can type in if you are a stickler for the old one. I don't remember what it is off the top of my head either. I liked. So the new website, I would say is probably an improvement. But I think me and a lot of people go this is not clearly a ton better in the way that maybe we were anticipating and I didn't have anything specific in my head for what I thought the new one would be. But it's just it's not as clearly better as I was hoping.

Roy:

Yeah, I would agree with that. It's, it's nice and

Jamie:

browsing easier to see are like, yeah, as you're just vaguely browsing, you're gonna see more minutes, which is nice. But just as somebody who's been on the old site plenty of times, I knew how to navigate that in a way that I'm not, I'm still not as comfortable navigating the new one, for starters.

Roy:

Yeah. Also, I think just for like a new person coming to the site. It's just not as the onboarding process to get someone who just doesn't know about app looks understand what app looks is, if you go to uplifted IO, I don't necessarily think that it's very easy or better than what it was before. I mean, there's the Learn section, which is nice. They had that kind of the the old side as well. Yeah, I mean, I don't know what I was hoping for expecting. But I guess it.

Jamie:

I think, to me, the one thing that I was sort of maybe hoping for was to have their own marketplace. That would have been that because, yeah, and I don't know if they're ever planning on doing that. That was sort of the biggest thing that I had in mind for, you know, them teasing a big new update for the website. That was sort of my hope,

Roy:

I think for the last month or two snuffer was saying that that wasn't going to be their marketplace. But yeah, it would have been nice to see that. Yeah, it's it's nice. I like it.

Jamie:

It's also it seems to lean into the curated stuff more than the previous website did.

Roy:

That's true. When you go to projects, there's the curated collection, and then there's old projects, not curated factory playground. So right,

Jamie:

it's sort of it's sort of looks like there's two tiers now instead of three. Yeah.

Roy:

Which, I mean, it's interesting decision, I guess it's sort of maybe takes away a little bit of the specialness of the playground if you want to say did that before but

Jamie:

yeah, it seems like to me it pulls up curated and it pulls up factory and it pulls down playground. Yeah. Like what's worked for me because I think I have two playgrounds in a shitload of curating factory pieces.

Roy:

Yeah, I think I also have the most in curated factory. But I do have a little play.

Jamie:

We have a couple more things to talk about in the art block section. But personally speaking, I had a sort of a big art blocks week. What happened? Do you know what happened?

Roy:

Wait, let me think you bought a sculptor, sculpture is that that might

Jamie:

have been last week, and that's not that big. But I no longer have a squiggle. Oh, I traded my one and only squiggle which I had no plans on doing whatsoever. Yeah, but you got a pretty good I got I think I got a great deal out of it. I got an ace a very nice looking, in my opinion, summer fragments of the infinite field piece for actually actually got that plus half an ether for my squiggle. Oh, very nice. Yeah, I was not planning on doing that. But I was, you know, I post in the trade section on the artbox discord a decent amount, just because I love the idea of trading NFT's but it is so so rare that I ever get a deal to happen. And then this just happened. I was I, I just I love the fragments of an infinite field so much. And I only had one. And I just I want to start building towards a full set of it. So I basically said, Hey, I got you know, these things that I'm interested in these things. One of the things that I said I was interested in was the fragments. The scribble was actually not even a thing that I listed, because it was not a thing I was planning on getting rid of at all. But you know, in these things, you often you just send people into your wallet, and they'll look around and you'll talk and we ended up coming to this deal. And I now I have a beautiful fragments of an infinite field.

Roy:

That's that's really cool. I think that yeah, the floor for the summer ones is going to be higher than the four first Google right.

Jamie:

It is it's it's 20 versus like 11 Right now, I think. Wow. And my specific one was, let me I'm going to pull it up right now. And what we can also link to it in the show notes, but mine had previously sold for a huge number. It was like the 17th most expensive ever frag sale. I think it's their highest last sale and in my wallet here. Yes, it sold for 39.7. Wow. Which is fucking huge. Yeah. And then the floor on the Summers is so steep that boy, it could get crazy fast. So let me see here. On September 16. The previous owner had bought her for 39.7 ether. That is not $53,000. Yeah, that's crazy. This is all crazy. NFT's

Roy:

are crazy. They really are. Yeah. When you when you really think boy, it's,

Jamie:

it's it. I love this project so much. I have a much harder time finding an autumn piece that I like the boy spring, winter and summer I find 90% of all three of those seasons to be fucking beautiful. And I love this one that I got

Roy:

really is an excellent, excellent collection.

Jamie:

Should we talk about the other things though? Oh, we

Roy:

have another thing to talk about which we didn't even put on our list. But there was meant to be a curated drop this week. And it was canceled.

Jamie:

Oh, right. And we talked we talked about one week ago or two. Yeah,

Roy:

interrupted last week. We were talking about being excited for it and how it was coming up or how it's

Jamie:

dropping. Yeah, posting a lot of new stuff on his Instagram still. And I'm liking all of it.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, I liked the look of it as well. But he basically what what a

Jamie:

what a sort of brave decision. Oh, yeah. To just turn down that much money.

Roy:

Yes. I mean, the oddest basically said, for various reasons. He wasn't comfortable. He just didn't want to go ahead with the drop. And he decided that he was saying

Jamie:

that he was feeling too much pressure and wasn't 100% satisfied with the outputs of the algorithm. Is that pretty fair?

Roy:

Yeah. I think that that's what he said it and yeah, I mean, if you think about it, he was gonna, for sure. Sell out. 1000 minutes at, let's say, between two to 5/8 at the low end,

Jamie:

let's just call it two just to be super safe. Yeah. So that's it. Seven,

Roy:

8 million US dollars. Let's say he took home even half of that, which Yeah, that's just ludicrous. Yeah, to just say it's, uh, yeah,

Jamie:

that's a ballsy thing to to walk away from because of because of anything really but Right. Yeah, I guess it was his mental health and his artistic integrity. He felt like the project was just not ready to be to be distributed like that.

Roy:

Yeah. It's also like, very much proves the point to that flies in the face of all these people saying, all these op looks audits that is cash grabbing with these Dutch auctions. They're just for the money. Yeah, or at least for this specific or this specific one, for sure why, but I think by and large as well. I mean, when they started the curation, the process, like, for many of them, the amount of money that they would be getting was still significant, but nowhere near what they're getting now, because the landscape has changed.

Jamie:

Right? Yeah. And it also, to me seems like the idea of going from the flat price to the Dutch auction was, it was more for management than from the artists. And it was to prevent gas wars, not to, not to make the artist. I mean, it was to get more money in the artists pockets. But to it was to get it from basically the miners rather than the collectors because the miners were just collecting so much compared to the artist. And there was not really a good reason that that should be happening. And then if people are, you know, too much FOMO and paying too early in the Dutch auction like they're not supposed to. That's not the artists or snow froze fault. That's, that's on them. Pretty much.

Roy:

Yeah. Yeah, I think it's been a good change. By and large, it's not perfect, but it's better.

Jamie:

Yeah, I agree.

Roy:

All right. What else?

Jamie:

The last nope, not the last. And we have two more things, we still only talked about one list, and got sidetracked twice. But the other things we wanted to talk about was the projects being separated on open sea now. So previously, on open sea, if you are looking at art block stuff that was basically three collections, there was art blocks, curated art blocks, playground, and art blocks factory. And this made searching pretty difficult. And it made filtering pretty difficult because it was lumping all the projects within those three different categories together. So the trait rarities were, you know, every single trait in every single project, to an amateur would seem much more rare than it really was. Because just as a for instance, if you're looking at, say, the spiral trait of the fidenza, it'll say what percentage of pieces in this collection have that trait. But the collection that opens he was describing was art blocks curated, not fidenza. So this the sample was way bigger. And then just also, you know, if you're if you're searching price low to high, you're just never going to see tons of projects, for instance, because you're only going to see the cheapest ones of curated playground or factory depending on which which collection you are under. So that's sort of a pretty darn welcome change to most people.

Roy:

Yeah, I think most people are very happy with it. The, as you said, one of the biggest things was when you were searching individual traits, it would basically always come up with Hey, this is only point 5% or 1% or point 5%. And hey, you everyone would think that's very rare. But then when you consider it's point 5% out of 100,000 factory pieces, it's actually not that rare within the collection. I think there was some concern among collectors that if all of the projects were like not necessarily under the art blocks banner would be hard for new collectors to sort of find new projects and potentially hurt the overall brand. But

Jamie:

it seems like the art blocks branding is down a little bit and the artist branding is up because now instead of you know the just art bucks curator art books, prick playground, art blocks factory, for instance, I'll just go to the same example. It now says fidenza by Tyler hops, that's the name of Columbia open see now.

Roy:

But it still is possible to search for uploads curated and you basically have the old way of searching that that still exists. So yeah, to me, it's just a good overall change.

Jamie:

Yeah, I agree. I like it.

Roy:

Speaking of Tyler hubs, he has a new drop which is very exciting.

Jamie:

Yeah, people have been I think silently excited and I don't know scared excited all sorts of big emotions about his playground trot because you know, just fidenza was just such a big game changer for the artbox market and curated and all of this stuff that to to get a playground drop out of them you just knew It was going to be a huge deal, and super coveted stuff. So any word on it was going to be really exciting. And now we finally got the info. And it's kind of crazy how small the drop is, since in general art blocks is trying to move to sort of more consistent drops of about 1000 pieces, it seems to me and this one, there's only going to be 100 of Yeah. Which is crazy. Yeah, I mean, eternal pumps is even crazier, for instance. But you know, like the eternal pumps drop happened, I guess ringers was already established as sort of the biggest deal and curated but at the time, that number was still tiny compared to what ringers and fidenza is go for nowadays.

Roy:

Yeah. And just like the amount of people that were buying, and trading interested in art blocks was probably like, 10% of what it is now.

Jamie:

Yeah, all of the things were just not on the same scale that they are now.

Roy:

Now, do we know for sure that this is an up looks playground drop?

Jamie:

We do. Okay.

Roy:

That's good. I wasn't sure. So what we what at

Jamie:

what and I say that, but I'm actually a percent sure. Yeah. Not not 100. But I believe I saw those words. Okay.

Roy:

Maybe it would make a lot of sense if it was it's, it's by Tyler Hobbs. And it's in collaboration with bright moments gallery who have launched the crypto Venetians and upcoming crypto New Yorkers. And rituals, I think they they had a part in that, which are all ops projects. So let's talk about it, it's 100 minutes, it's called incomplete control, whether it's incomplete or in complete control room, it's up to interpretation. 50 of the minutes will be available to be purchased by Dutch auction. And the starting price is 500. eth. So close to 500 eth. I mean, the floor for fidenza, which is our 999 mid collection is like 150 to 208th. So yeah, I mean, maybe people are gonna pay 500.

Jamie:

I'm very, very curious to see what the first price paid will be. It's gonna be outrageous, that's for sure. I'm just quickly here. I pulled up the Twitter and bright moments tweet that Tyler Hobbs retweeted does say, at our blocks mint playground. So it is officially a playground project.

Roy:

Nice. Yeah, so it starts at 500 eth. And every five minutes, the price will drop to a resting price of five eth, which is still, I mean, it's a lot, but it's not going to get there. Because there's only 50 of these, you can correct it going for. I would say it's not going to drop below 50 eth. And probably, it's just crazy.

Jamie:

It's also like, you know, it's funny, because I think we've seen not even a hint of what it'll look like. Yeah. So it's possible that like, after we see the first minute, or the first couple of minutes, the reaction will go one way or the other, and it'll just barely drop anymore at all because people go, Holy shit, this is like another amazing project, or they'll or there will just be disappointment that oh, this is the follow up to fidenza. Yeah, which could allow it to drop a lot more. Yeah. Because I mean, there's just, it's hard to live up to the hype of the next project after fidenza. So I'm very just curious. You know, this is not something that I'll be able to be a part of. So I'm only going to be looking at it as a outside artistic observer. I'm very curious what it looks like. I'm excited for that.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, I'm very curious about the output as well, but I have an outside chance of buying one. i So

Jamie:

what is it 50 of them are reserved for fidenza holders, and it's kind of even randomly distributed. So 50 for the Dodgers will give you what a one in 20 chance? Uh,

Roy:

no, not quite so 50 for the Dutch auction and of the remaining 51 is for Tyler hubs. Two are for bright moments. And then 24 are reserved for fidenza holders and 23 are reserved for crypto citizens. So crypto citizens, I believe holders of crypto Venetians and crypto New Yorkers.

Jamie:

Sounds like you have a 2.4% chance of getting one because of your fidenza.

Roy:

I also have crypto venation. So 4.8 Or no, no, no, that doesn't sound right point four eight maybe. Because there's Oh yeah.

Jamie:

Yeah. 2.4 To vida. I'm not interested in No,

Roy:

I mean, it's complicated math because you need to know how many crypto citizens there are. I'm not quite sure how many there are right Anyway, I have a small chance of

Jamie:

that's exciting, huh? You don't get one for every You're a lucky son of a bitch. So you're probably just fucking big fish.

Roy:

I would love to hang on, let me see how much I can purchase it for. Yeah. So if even if you're lucky and get this, I mean, you are lucky if you get this, you have the option to purchase one at 50% of the final Dutch auction price. So if it sells out at 180 and I win this. Yeah, but it would not be difficult to be like, Hey, friends, would you like to, you know, yeah, buy a piece of this for this in complete control. But I would probably just sell all the things and get together the 58 If I had to,

Jamie:

for why. I'm just now I'm I'm still just thinking about the art of it. And yeah, can't wait to see it.

Roy:

I kinda I wonder if he's posted anything on his Instagram or Twitter or anything?

Jamie:

I don't think so. I follow him pretty vociferous Lee, which is probably not the right word. But I do I do follow him on both of those platforms. Yeah. And I feel like I've seen lots of updates. And just none of them are that it's all just here's a hand painted fidanza here's a really blown up print of a fidenza. Yeah, I'm at Marfa, all that sort of stuff until I saw these updates about this new project. But but they were all text telling you about the project not not a hint of what

Roy:

yeah. It's also worth noting that it's not the drop isn't until December. And in order to meet you have to meet in person in New York City. Right at bright moments gallery, I think. Yeah. Yeah. Very exciting.

Jamie:

I mean, so can we go back to crypto citizen that is crypto Venetians plus something else? Or is it just I believe it's

Roy:

Venetians plus crypto New Yorkers, which I don't think they're a thing yet but I guess they heard of those I don't think it's basically the same thing as crypto Venetians that this in person Gallery in New York. Yeah. And I don't believe it's happened yet, but I guess the thinking will have had to happen to some of them will have had happened if that's the right phrasing. By the time the incomplete drop happens

Jamie:

yeah, I just got distracted reading some weirdos angry response to Tyler's tweet about this let's hear why is he announced they said why even announced this restricted to super elite group of NFT whales already? Throw on some black robes and gargoyle masks, as you award tickets in ancient catacomb for your secret Clubman laughing my ass off.

Roy:

I bet if it was

Jamie:

I barely know what that guy said.

Roy:

He's unhappy because he couldn't pay I understand something and then immediately have it be worth a million.

Jamie:

Why even announced this? Like? We shouldn't announce it because there's only 100 of them or something. I don't get that.

Roy:

Yeah. Some people whatever, you know.

Jamie:

So but we now we have officially covered all three of the topics we wanted to cover for our blocks. Plus another four that we thought of. Yeah, we're on heads.

Roy:

I guess that's it for up looks.

Jamie:

Our Twitter q&a. Now we stole that right? She actually say that we've never actually said that. Yeah, we

Roy:

definitely stole it from another podcast,

Jamie:

Gilmore Guys,

Roy:

which is a great podcast.

Jamie:

It is a great podcast about a great TV show Gilmore data segment called Twitter q&a. And they basically saying that exact same jingle before

Roy:

and the as we head to the q&a, we're like, I guess we bought in

Jamie:

house and now we've also adopted it for every other thing.

Roy:

Yeah. I don't think they did that today.

Jamie:

Definitely not. They have like more production and stuff. What's his name? Kevin. He was doing all sorts of shit. Yeah. Pop culture Supercuts and everything. Anyway, this is the quick q&a segment of our podcast, not the gushing about door guys podcast. Yep. First question comes from at peaceful investor, they say do you see institutional interest in the NFT space as a good or bad thing?

Roy:

I think it's a good thing. Just I mean, purely because if they're interested, they have a lot of money. That money is probably going to flow to most of the people that are already in the space and invested in it. And I think sort of the nature of NFT's being non fungible means that it's more difficult for them to come in with it. Large amounts of money and just control the market in a way that they may be able to in traditional crypto traditional finance where they can move the market with massive, massive buys or sells or shorts. with NFT's, as we saw this week, if someone just says I'm not selling, they can't buy that NFT. So the famous

Jamie:

you're referring to Richards punk. Yeah. So

Roy:

Richard, who is somewhat well known in the NFT space and the community, he has a crypto

Jamie:

co founder of manifold I think, yep.

Roy:

Among other projects. manifold is sort of like a web3 Company, they they launch other projects, basically, they custom code, the smart contracts.

Jamie:

They're writers of smart contract. Yes. Is what I would say.

Roy:

Yeah. Anyway, he, there was some sort of Twitter thread going on, about every entity has price or whatnot. And he replied, there's no price for my punk. My punk is not for sale. And then I think he

Jamie:

was the original poster. And then like that, that trainer guy, Joseph or something. I don't know if you know who that is. But they got into NFT somewhat recently responded and said, everybody has a price. Yeah, I was like, I do not. I do not have a price. Yeah, my punk is not for sale. And I can't remember what Richards original tweet was.

Roy:

And then in response to that seems like it's on sale, was just opposed by POAP.XYZ. So that's just a company in the NFT space. And they basically made an offer of 2500 eth. So almost $10 million on his punk trying to call his bluff. Yeah. And so he's punk. It's not a floor punk. But it's not not like nearly that close. Like, it's got

Jamie:

three glasses, which makes it definitely above floor. But it's it shouldn't be worth more than like a million at today's prices. And they were offering them nine and a half basically. Yeah.

Roy:

And he just event he basically just came out like a few hours later saying my punk is not for sale. Yeah, and

Jamie:

I guess people are not totally sure if it was some fun. What do you call it publicity scheme? But you know, they have said specifically that it was not, who knows who cares? It was still it's still fun and crazy. Yeah.

Roy:

Well, I mean, Richard said that it was not some orchestrated thing between the parties beforehand, but it was probably some sort of publicity thing by pull up just because yeah, I mean, we're all talking about how

Jamie:

can it be if it's not orchestrated? Because then they're literal, I mean, unless buying it for that much was was an OK outcome to them.

Roy:

I guess the risk was there. I mean, maybe they

Jamie:

transcribe Obviously, every every fucking jokester on Twitter afterwards, like, oh, yeah, I would hate that for me too. Mine's definitely not for sale. Wink wink that kind of Yeah. Trying to trick somebody into offering them millions for their Yeah, floor ape, or punk or whatever.

Roy:

But yeah, that's sort of like the it's become an will become the like, Epitome in the go to example of my NFT is not for sale.

Jamie:

Right. Yeah. So that I would say my answer is that, in general, it is a good thing because it legitimizes NFTs, and we're still in a time where most people have never heard of them. And then once you get past that group, most of the people that have heard of them think it's nonsense, yeah. So we still have a lot of legitimising and educating to do and I'm happy for basically anything that that moves that forward, which I believe institutional interest will do. And to your point, they can never just think they can't buy if you don't want to sell them, your JPEGs you don't have to. So I don't really see the negative ramifications. You know, you know, obviously, if they come in as bad actors, they can be bad actors, but it's all decentralized and we can kind of just have our NFT community for the most part, just operate around them and not interact with their cash grab NFT's or whatever USDC bids that they are acting like our s bids are whatever bad things they try and do in the space. We can just kind of avoid that.

Roy:

As punk six five to nine always says don't let the institutions do your JPEGs

Jamie:

Yeah, or or let them but only let them do it for an amount of money that you are, you know, really gonna be happy selling out.

Roy:

So good thing. I think we both agree. Yeah,

Jamie:

I think so. And more interest in NFT's is pretty much always a good thing. thing to me right now because yeah, we're still so early.

Roy:

At true. Shay Stiles says, How do you both pronounce and then the word is are you t I would pronounce it route.

Jamie:

I would too but sometimes I think I do say route.

Roy:

Yeah, I don't say route. The word

Jamie:

route to me has to do with like a an army getting routed in a battle when they when they lose and they they run away. That's that's a route.

Roy:

I don't think I've heard it that way.

Jamie:

Well, you've listened to enough Dan Carlin podcast that I'm sure you still remember it? Because you're not obsessive as I am. Alright, but unfortunately, yeah, we both pretty much say route, route 66. That's a famous Route I'm thinking of in my brain here. And I believe I just call it route. Okay. If Yeah, well, this is not interesting. But they asked. I'm thinking if I was gonna say, like, a specific route on the highway, I'd say route. But if I'm asking how somebody got there, I might say what route did you take? This is your though, by the way, you included this as one of the

Roy:

questions. I thought it would be funny. I thought we were going to disagree on the Yeah,

Jamie:

unfortunately, no. All right. All right. Asht dot F says, would be interesting to hear both of your thoughts on how sustainable the inverse correlation between F price and NFT prices are? How big do you think the market needs to get to be able to decouple from this correlation? Cheers. Well, I was looking forward to listening.

Roy:

Soon interesting question, the way that it's phrased makes it sound to me like he thinks, or they think that there's a certain market size where NFT's and eth price won't be correlated. I'm not sure that I necessarily agree with that. Well, but

Jamie:

he's saying an inverse correlation to which which basically means as one goes up, the other goes down.

Roy:

Yes, I mean, inverse correlation or correlation, I think is going to be a thing that as long as NFT's on the Ethereum network bought and sold in they'll have some

Jamie:

sort of relation you'd think, yes, I do think so we've, we've touched on this before, like somebody I think, last week had asked, you know, how do you think NFT prices will react to changes in F prices? And we basically said, we've seen both things happen. But the thing that we are I was saying was that I think the inverse correlation has more to do with NFT prices and gas prices, too, whereas gas goes up, and ft prices go down, because it just becomes so much more expensive to do anything with the cheaper NFT's, which are already illiquid. And then that can lead to sort of a cascading undercutting of for prices.

Roy:

Yeah, I agree with that. I think that as the market does get larger as more money enters the Etherium ecosystem, and as people are just having bankrolls finances accounts in ESA, and thinking of that as their theory money, and just buying and selling with that, there will be less of a correlation between the eth price and sort of prices of entities in eth. Just because people won't be constantly thinking about, hey, I'm going to transfer 5000 US Dollars turn into eth, and then use that to buy NFT's. They'll just have some US dollars. And then some eth in the Yeah. And I

Jamie:

wonder like, Yeah, well, just crypto is still so volatile. And I wonder if we get or maybe when is a better word, when we get to a real real mass adoption of it, we're just everybody acknowledges that it is a part of society, and it's legitimate, and all of this stuff, how non volatile the prices of things like Bitcoin, and like Aetherium are liable to be because obviously, they are so volatile now that that the markets kind of have to react. But if you look at the traditional currency markets, things like the US dollar and the yuan and stuff like that, you know, a really big day. I actually don't know the answer to this, but I think it's, you know, they might go down 2.25% or something like that. So it's just an apologies to currency traders, if that's even 10x bigger when an actual dip would be but it is something microscopic compared to the percentage change that you can see day to day in even the biggest and least volatile of crypto assets.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, even a 10x that's let's say two to 3% with Bitcoin, you will not infrequently The five to 10% swings. Yeah, yeah. And occasionally like, much, much more we'd like within a week it can swing 30%.

Jamie:

We haven't mentioned this yet, but we're basically at all time highs right now for Bitcoin and knocking on the door of it with ether.

Roy:

Yeah, it's been a bullish week or two for traditional crypto and NFT's have sort of been suffering, perhaps as a consequence, yeah, probably as a consequence.

Jamie:

Yeah, I wonder, actually, it might be interesting to look, I guess a lot of NFT's are not developed enough to be able to do this easily, just the market in general, but because of the way that their block space is not crowded, and doesn't have these gas issues that you have with ether, it would be interesting to test the inverse correlation to gas price theory and see if you know, as SWANER prices go up, just want to NFT prices not go up. Because, you know, I'm sort of theorizing that it's not the end of the Ethereum price is going up here. It's the gas prices going up that is leading to the softness in the NFT market. And that would be sort of a good control group.

Roy:

Yeah, there's gonna be a lot of awesome data analysis that can be and will be done, you know, in a year, two years, three years, just looking back on all of this history, and how the market has reacted.

Jamie:

All right, next question. I guess I read the last one. I'll let you do this.

Roy:

At full. Lila says, The next blue chip currently under five eth. Exclamation mark,

Jamie:

you're you're supposed to just pronounce it a specific way because of the exclamation mark.

Roy:

Okay, the next blue chip currently under five eth.

Jamie:

Better? How would you do? Would you do it? I don't want to want it. How would you do it? I personally I would not put an exclamation mark.

Roy:

In the role of reading this question out.

Jamie:

It's, you know what? I apologize. It does seem like a tough to read that sentence of an exclamation.

Unknown:

Thank you. Now. Yeah.

Jamie:

What's the answer to the question, though? Do you have one?

Roy:

Next blue chip? Currently on the 5/8?

Jamie:

I don't really have a good answer. I'm just gonna say this, though. People seem to like those creatures. I think they're under five eth.

Roy:

They are under five, eight.

Jamie:

I haven't I have none. I haven't looked into it much. But people whose opinions I respect seem to like them, and I think they're under fivey. So I'll just I'll say that out loud without putting too much thought into it as my knee jerk reaction.

Roy:

Alright, I think that's a pretty reasonable pick. It's, yeah, a lot of people like them. And I would probably say, well, the women because that's a good one. They've been around a little bit longer. That's probably just the number one reason like that there are a lot of good projects in the

Jamie:

jar is really good on them, too. It's I think that's worth mentioning. They look very good and different from I agree, the more cartoony, like, the colors are quite different. I don't know. It's, yeah, I quite like

Roy:

it. Great job on it on them. Yeah, so I'll say Well,

Jamie:

we know what else I'm this I have a handful of and again, the art is quite different. I mentioned them a few weeks ago, but the superlative secret society, I believe it's called, I never really hear anybody on Twitter, saying they don't like the art and I and I think a lot of people do like it. And it seems like they're they are doing some building out of the universe or whatever. I think potentially, that could be one because it it does seem like it shares that profile picture community type aspect, but it's it's quite differentiated. You know, it's not just another animal slash location type thing, which, which a lot of us feel is largely played out. It's, it's differentiated enough that I think it could emerge as a much bigger project than it currently is.

Roy:

I you know, I'm gonna buy one right now.

Jamie:

You don't have any I have none.

Roy:

I mean, yeah,

Jamie:

I think there were probably point two for something last I checked, they're at point

Roy:

two eight now they had a pretty nice day they went up about 40% from point one nine to point two six, and now point two eight, I guess. But yeah, they're a good pic there. I mean, that their floor is so much lower than I guess all the other ones we mentioned that it's probably going to take a little longer for them to reach the five

Jamie:

Yeah, they're not going to be at five eth anytime soon, but you'll see them the the the other thing is the traits on them instead of being Like, you know, a jacket, and basketball, Jersey, that kind of thing. They're all sort of personality traits. So you can actually pick one that is more you than just some outward appearance thing that you think looks cool or maybe looks like you. So you can pick one that's like, you know, not funny doesn't season his lamb shanks enough that kind of thing for your traits. And then that that is that like a really accurate one.

Roy:

All right, I bought two more. I got three now we should. All right.

Jamie:

Wow, that was I guess I was very convincing.

Roy:

Yeah. Well, I'm looking at them. And the art is nice. And they do a great, the one that if you have these as your profile picture, they will kind of look the same.

Jamie:

Yeah, a little bit. But if you look enough at the traits, you can use the bodies and stuff. But in terms of the individual coloring, yes. It's tough to tell one pattern from another.

Roy:

He's a really nice.

Unknown:

I'm not meant to be buying NFT's I'm meant to be? No, you're not. You're supposed to be recording a podcast about them. Yeah. Well, I mean, that's just what I'm immediately meant to be doing. But yeah, what

Jamie:

What about Oh, you mean, just in how you're always going? Oh, I need to pare down and it's appeared out? Yeah.

Roy:

I mean, I'm trying to go bad at it. I'm sorry about

Jamie:

that. Did you buy these in your 1/8 Challenge wallet by any chance just now? No. Oh, well. We'll talk about that later. Yeah. Give it let's give the audience one more. Potential. Next blue chip. That's under five. Okay, what else do we think is a good answer?

Roy:

Fluff world.

Jamie:

Okay, interesting that that was a project that came out at this point feels like maybe two months ago. And it just rocketed immediately, massively, and then crashed down pretty hard, but still to a fairly high floor. And I never got into it. But the thing that I remember is it had some sort of musical component that was quite different from most profile pictures.

Roy:

Yeah, so there's like a 3d Rabbit profile picture type project, but they're animated. And there's like a music track as one of the traits. And it was very different, as you said it launched and then I think prices like point 1.7 around there, added very quickly within 24 hours, like a 1.58 floor, and then just tanked down 2.5 or so it's out there for the longest time. And then then last week or two it's been climbing up to now it's around 1/8. And yeah, I guess community has just been building and doing cool things. And I can see it taking off more than normal.

Jamie:

Alright, there's a couple options. Nifty sent says is eponym. And by the way, I heard that you mispronounce this. And I don't I never actually heard what the official pronunciation is. So I believe it was incorrect. Me. I was. Okay. So I nailed it. Right from the gecko, big surprise. There is eponym. Now the odds on favorite to win meant to the year at the annual nifty awards?

Roy:

I mean, I don't know is this a real thing? I have no

Jamie:

idea. Their their name is nifty sense. So maybe, maybe it is a real thing that they're that they do that is not popular that they're trying to get free publicity for something. Yeah. But I don't know if that award is real, or what the meant of the Year award is given to is it just for the one where what the floor price is the biggest multiple of the min price? If so definitely not

Roy:

know, if it's like what the community votes is the coolest minting process then maybe?

Jamie:

Yeah, it gets warmer because we are at least to the to hosts of this podcast. And actually funny we this comes up in between the last segment in this one. I checked my email and three of mine had sold.

Roy:

Yeah, so I'm I'm pretty good prices as well. Right?

Jamie:

Yeah. 1.45 Each I had them. And these were all ones that I minted myself that I they're like, Yeah, we we it's hard for us to answer this question, because we don't know what that award is. If it's real or anything like that. Yeah. But I'll just say no, I think I do not think it's the odds on favorite.

Roy:

I'll say yes to perfect. I love the project. And I love the minting

Jamie:

I do. I think it's great. It was, you know, this is something that you tweet about somewhat often. And then I like that you do when you just talk about what it was a fun minting experience versus just a boring one where you click them in button and then you have a gasworks. not you have a real or not, but these ones that are interactive are so much more fun, like maps, the Dejan nifty Luiza called maybe, yeah, nifty, like de gens. And then this eponym were a few examples that I know you've talked about, all of which I've taken part in and all of which I had a lot more fun minting than just random things that there's just no interactivity whatsoever.

Roy:

Yeah, not only is like the minting process fun, it, it like stays with you, you get more of a personal connection to the NFT's. So then you just appreciate the more I think down on them.

Jamie:

I also saw somebody tweeting about the eponym project, how they were saying like, the the names of all of these pieces is literally capturing the current zeitgeist of the NFT market, which is very interesting.

Roy:

Yeah. Bunch of like GMs for Good morning. Yeah, a lot of that, like references to Vincent van do because he's a big collector right now. And yeah,

Jamie:

all the things. It's just shaped into this. I saw one called that.

Roy:

I mean, just there's names of projects, cool. Cats bought a yacht club. Really cats. Yeah. And it's such a cool project.

Jamie:

Is it is I had something else to say to it besides that tweet, though, and now I'm losing it for time.

Roy:

Um, so I'm into 47 eponyms. And then that's a lot. It is a lot. And about halfway through the minting process. I was loving it. But then I was like, I should stop because a the floor during the minting had dropped like,

Jamie:

point oh, 4.05. Yeah, they weren't going super quickly. They were

Roy:

not. And I was like, basically, I felt that so much of the value and enjoyment for me came for the minting process. Is anyone really gonna care and want to pay more and secondary for these? And I was like, maybe not. And then I was like, well, because

Jamie:

there's definitely other AI generated art projects that already exists. And they NFT. But they know they have not, but it was not clear at the time. You're mentoring. I'm saying basically, that the market would not treat this one similarly to those but it clearly has. And I think the the fun and interactivity of it is so a big part of that. Yeah, I think they also did a great job with the machine learning algorithm, in general for the project. But the the interactivity and allowing of the users to sort of curate them is just, it's, it's a game changer. Yeah. I mean, that also reminds me Go ahead.

Roy:

I was gonna say some of the outputs, like the phrases people put in, and then how well the outputs matched that even in an abstract sense, and then you imagine that the AI basically decided that, like, someone put in Ozymandias as a phrase, and after the famous poem by Mary, Billy something, nope. Do you know the name the

Jamie:

Mary sounds right. I thought you were gonna say Shelley, but that's no, that's the Frankenstein.

Roy:

Ozymandias is the poem. And the output is basically you can imagine that the Lions of the poem as you see it, so like her

Jamie:

see. Why is she Shelley? That's a weird middle name being Why SSHE

Roy:

I would say Percy fish, Shelley. We were so close. But so far.

Jamie:

Yeah. Yeah, we have the Shelley right but wrong, and not the Mary at all. No, no. But a great poem, though.

Roy:

Yeah. The poem talks about like a shattered village in the desert. And this eponym comes out and like, it's like, it looks like pyramids in the desert with sand and like purple hues. And it's just like, you can really see the like, what it's going for anything you get, like if you're an artist drew that and tiled it Ozymandias. You go. Yeah, that sounds about right. And then

Jamie:

it's applicable. Yeah. Yeah. My very first one, I the very first time I opened the website, the first thing I typed in was the assassination of Julius Caesar. And the output that he gave me, I minted it immediately. And it's like, it's it's fantastic. Yeah. What a cool project.

Roy:

What a cool project. All right. I think I'm up next nifty. Rick said what gaming? NFT's if any, are you both invested in?

Jamie:

I think the ones that we're both invested in is Zed, chicken Derby and then the D jet. What is it one more time de gens. Nifty league de Johns. I think those are the only ones that both of us are in.

Roy:

Are you in any others?

Jamie:

Probably. I mean I guess it depends on how you want to talk about this, right? Because we know for instance, that the board a yacht club has a Sean chain game coming. So in that sense, yes, I have others, but ones where it's sort of all about the game. I don't think I have any others.

Roy:

Yeah, I definitely have a bunch that. I mean, I have both. So the oxys Yeah, specifically about the games as boxes. Riot races. Galaxy Fight Club. Those are the three that come to mind. Oh, Episode, have episode land guild of Guardians.

Jamie:

Oh, yeah. I guess I have a gilded Guardian somewhere that's like not on ether or something, though. It's

Roy:

on immutable x. So you can just basically connect your Aetherium wallet and claiming it'll be I see. Yeah,

Jamie:

I think I have that in like ether more, maybe. I don't know if either more is explicitly a game or if they were just sort of Dungeons and Dragons sort of flavored. Yeah, I don't think I remember them saying explicitly. They had a game coming, but maybe they did.

Roy:

No, I don't think I have that one. Crypto Krypto Raiders. I have one of those I think. Yeah. Punks comics is apparently like that a gaming thing. Now they're building a game, but

Jamie:

Well, yeah, I mean, they just raised What 90 million to make this triple A game. We're told so yeah. Theoretically, there's something gaming coming. Oh, and but I guess I don't really know. In what way the NFT's interact with the game. Yeah. So

Roy:

yeah, there were a bunch

Jamie:

there. Those are game of Jason. Maybe.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, even cool. Cats that game address? Oh, bitmap, I'd say that's pretty. That's more adjacent to games, because then yeah, so again,

Jamie:

these are a lot of there's a lot of these that are definitely adjacent. But in terms of the ones that are purely gaming. And fts. I think the the three I started with are the ones that we both have, and then you named a couple others that only you have.

Roy:

Yeah.

Jamie:

Alright, at Eddie loves crypto said, Can you speculate on what Coinbase is going to do with NFTs? I feel like this can and we largely did in the news of the week. But maybe in that segment, we did more hard hitting journalism where we delivered the news. Would you like to just speculate and do something that's more opinion journalism right now?

Roy:

Sure. Um,

Jamie:

I could see. We did that too, though. Yeah. But yeah, what are you thinking?

Roy:

I can see them coming out with like, their own coin base, NFT's that appeal to newbies newcomers, price low, and maybe they have some mechanism in which to avoid gas, like transactions for them. Like if they're within your Coinbase account, then you may not necessarily have to pay the regular gas transaction fees to? I don't know.

Jamie:

That's one thing I'm, I'm I have a couple other thoughts that I didn't bring up like, one thing I'm wondering about is so let's, let's just for starters, assume that they only have a theory of NFT's in their marketplace to begin with. Let's start there. If somebody has a coin base account, and they have a balance of other cryptocurrencies, I'm curious how easy and how many clicks and all of these types of questions, they'll make it for somebody who has a balance of whatever, to buy these Ethereum network and fts. I wonder how much they'll just do in the background and make it easy for somebody to do that? Or if they'll do that at all? You know? Yeah, that's something I'm quite curious about.

Roy:

That's a really interesting point. I can see that just being if you you're in the marketplace, you want to buy one you don't know the theorem. It's like, Would you like to convert Solana to Aetherium and then just pay? Yes. And whatever.

Jamie:

And they they can theoretically, they just have a balance of all of them and don't even need to do the literal transaction. They can just do accounting on their own books, basically. Yeah,

Roy:

that's true. You can pay for in Silvana Yeah, yeah. That would be excellent. Yeah,

Jamie:

definitely. What else? You know, one of these, and I touched on this also, in the other segment, where I talked about what show us doing but I wouldn't be surprised to see them, pair themselves up with some big people in the space and have, you know, almost like Twitter did where they have like branded NFT's where they collaborate with some big NFT artists or something, or like the Time Magazine might be an even better example. Yeah, and just kind of have their own line of NFT's with existing NFT artists, or even existing traditional artists that they bring over to the NFT space. Yeah,

Roy:

I can see them doing both of those things. And I think that it'd be well received if they did that.

Jamie:

Yeah, I mean, if they're good and priced fairly or whatever, I don't see why not.

Roy:

Yeah. Anything else to add?

Jamie:

No, I think we covered it twice now.

Roy:

Yeah. Captain Zwingli says, What's your favorite poker story about at Jamie musings and his favorite story about you? I guess the way the question is, is he's asking about my favorite story about user. I'll go with that. Well, we have a lot of poker stories. And I will before the show, I was like, trying to decide on which one to talk about, and the one I settled on is, it's Poker adjacent. But I wouldn't say it's fully a poker story. But

Jamie:

basically, I was there for poker tournament. So and it took place of basically in a poker Casino.

Roy:

Yeah. We were in Melbourne at the crown Casino. And we were there for I can't remember what poker tournament was. I don't think it was

Jamie:

a World Series of Poker. Asia Pacific.

Roy:

Yeah, I think you're right. That's what we were there for. I

Jamie:

think I am too.

Roy:

We played a small amount of poker. We ate a lot of Nando's and

Jamie:

betting a lot of NFL

Roy:

NFL. Yeah. And basically, they have a, they have have had, there was a sports book, basically, within the the poker room where you could go up, place your bets, as as you would have disposable. And we were doing this pretty frequently. I think, during our time there. You made a bet. I can't remember how much. The bet was, but you won. And the payout was pretty reasonable. A significant few $1,000. Let's say it was $4,000. Yeah, it was

Jamie:

it was a not insignificant amount of money, but not so much money that what ended up happening

Roy:

isn't it's not an enormous amount of money for a casino by any stretch,

Jamie:

right? We go especially on a casino like that, you know, we have some very small rural casinos in the US where that would be a huge number for them. But

Roy:

definitely the largest casino

Jamie:

in that whole continent of Oceana.

Roy:

Yeah. Anyway, Jamie walks up to the counter with his ticket to you know, get his $4,000 and the lady is like, oh, okay, one second. She goes into the back room, comes back out. It's like, it's in the safe, and then I think we're like, okay, and she's like, I'm gonna have to get into it. Okay. Okay, she's back. And then I think she's in there for a few minutes comes back out and is like a, we're gonna call the locksmith. So yeah, apparently, she entered the code incorrectly into the safe. Yeah,

Jamie:

she locked. The safe was already locked, but because she unsuccessfully tried to unlock it, like, super locked itself. And they had to call down a locksmith to pay out my money.

Roy:

Yeah. And like, I wouldn't have even expected them to need to keep that in the safe. Like, if you go to a cashier in, like anywhere else in the casino. With chips, they can give you 10s of 1000s of dollars, but I guess,

Jamie:

right. This one could not do. Yes. 1000s.

Roy:

And around the same time, there was like a line of people waiting behind. Oh, yeah. Getting ready to cash in their chips. And they were getting really mad because they had 12 the hose that they couldn't get.

Jamie:

Right. And they had to wait for a locksmith first. Yeah,

Roy:

yeah, this is bullshit. And then you're just sitting there twiddling your thumbs.

Jamie:

I had a flight in like 18 hours. I was like, I can't be waiting for this locksmith for too long.

Roy:

Yeah. All right. That's that's one of my poker stories. What do you got?

Jamie:

My favorite story about you for poker? Well, the one that comes to mind most immediately is the de Blasio story. I can't remember this too well, but my I'll give my recollection of it. I want to say the year was like 2007. Is that

Roy:

reasonable? That right? Yeah.

Jamie:

Right. So you are playing poker under age? Yep. And now at the time you lived in Australia, and I lived in Providence, Rhode Island. Let's just start there. So I'm in Providence, Rhode Island. You're at the Bellagio in a hotel room in Las Vegas. And I guess what it happened is you irresponsibly lost all of your money and didn't have a way to pay for your hotel room. Is that Is that accurate?

Roy:

That's roughly correct. So I write all my, like real world money. I had a bunch of money On my in my poker accounts, but there was no easy way for me to get from, like PokerStars and full tilt to rake account to pay for the last year bill.

Jamie:

Yeah. And so basically, I got money from my bank and flew out to Las Vegas to make sure that you could check out of your room at the Bellagio. That was roughly it. Yeah, we had like a fun weekend hanging out. Yeah, it was

Roy:

fun. I think in return, I was like, Ah,

Jamie:

I mean, we made some sort of staking arrangement for the upcoming World Championship of online poker. That was favorable to me.

Roy:

Yes, yeah. I was like, I wanted to, you know, I was going to like pay for your flight, obviously, and stuff to come out and make given the money. But we ended up coming to this arrangement where I think I staked you in the W coupe World Championship online poker and you got like, a ton of the percentage, and then you ended up getting like 12 or something in the tournament six to maybe for a bunch of money would you get?

Jamie:

Well, I think you're misremembering here, because I got fifth place in 2009. But I'm, I'm almost sure that that was years later when

Roy:

it really didn't get fun. You know what, yes,

Jamie:

you're sort of right. Because I had I had done well in it. I got like, 36th place or something like that. Prior to getting my fifth place? Yeah,

Roy:

I definitely remember I was I was traveling with another friend of mine, Phil, and you were like, going really deep in the tournament. And I was like, trying to find Wi Fi to McDonald's so I could get an update.

Jamie:

Man you don't back. is so fun and exciting. Yeah. I know. I think I know. Phil, right. He was in Tokyo for a little bit.

Roy:

Yeah. You know, so we played some board games together. I feel. I'm not sure it was

Jamie:

probably not a listener. No, I don't think so.

Roy:

That's that's two of us. But we have a lot of progress stories.

Jamie:

We have a lot. Yeah, stories.

Roy:

We'll get to those. I

Jamie:

you know what else I also liked? I was visiting you in Australia, one year for New Year's? Oh, yeah. Or I happen to be there for two years. I don't think it was necessarily that yeah, I was visiting for that. But at the time, you're trying to get a status on PokerStars called supernova elite, which basically just meant you had to play a certain amount of poker over the course of the year. And you're sort of on track until mid November or whatever and had been slacking off. And for your last like three days, you had to play an obscene amount. And just watching you basically, asleep at your desk playing like 12 tables of poker for hours and hours in a row is a vaguely vivid and humorous image of you. And I did that every GPU but yeah, you did it over and over again. Yeah. I always got supernova but never supernova elite. That was too crazy. And when I'm out.

Roy:

Yeah, it really was. I mean, it wasn't it wasn't like it was

Jamie:

worth a lot of money, though. If you could do it.

Roy:

Yeah, it was worth just for the the rewards maybe like $150,000 a year. Right. Plus, presumably I was winning money at poker as well, hopefully.

Jamie:

Right? Yeah. And then the amount it was actually worth kind of depended on how much you put it. How much time you put in the next year, because it was sort of increasing your percentage you got back or whatever.

Roy:

Hmm. And there's good old days. Kind poker, like NFT's are much better

Jamie:

though. They are just like there was also some great times in poker for sure.

Roy:

Yeah, definitely.

Jamie:

I still I haven't felt anything in NFT's that is as exciting as getting really deep in a tournament. But boy, the the monotony and disappointing disappointment that you feel so often in poker is not something I've had to encounter in NFT's yet at all.

Roy:

Yeah, I agree.

Jamie:

This has been Twitter q&a. q&a. Right. Let's get an update on your one s challenge.

Unknown:

No EDIS challenge, a little bit

Jamie:

of heat on Twitter for saying that.

Roy:

Yeah. Rightly so good. It's been a, I would say a mundane slash bad week for the one Youth Challenge wallet. It's been bad in the sense that the whole NFT market is kind of down slash bleeding. And it's especially apparent at the lower end, where the NFT's are valued. less than point five less than point three less than point one eth. Because gas as we've spoken about so many times before when gas is high, low valued entities suffer. Excuse me, so the entity portfolio value has just tanked by maybe two 30% And in terms of actively buying and selling, I don't think I bought anything since last week. Maybe that's not true. Like,

Jamie:

I know we spoke about a significant enough that you can remember it. Yeah, nothing

Roy:

significant enough. Maybe I bought some pixel beasts and soars dream machine and dock horizons, like those the most recent things I bought, but I think I might have both had them last week anyway. Regardless, it's not very significant. And,

Jamie:

by the way, is your one a challenge wallet like, public? Do we? Yeah, we know what the address is all. Because it seems like it would be easy for us to be following it. But I don't think I've ever actually clicked on it. Maybe we should include it in the show notes,

Roy:

we'll add a link to the show, link link to it in the show notes. It's in my Discord. I have a channel dedicated to it. And it's sort of like the wallet address and link to it is pinned in there. So so people have been able to follow it. But yeah, if you just listen to the podcast, and perhaps aren't in the discord, then we'll put a link so you can see what's in there. And you can basically track what's going on. But yeah, it's just been a quiet week, I think I'm not particularly concerned or anything like the market is down. I believe it'll recover. And I believe most of the things I earned will recover. Not all some of them are probably worthless. But by and large, I think I bought pretty good things. And they'll do well. And I'm not in a rush. Like, I think my overall value for the wallet last week was four and a half maybe. And now it's probably around three to three and a half, which is still pretty excellent. It's been a month. That's a three plus x. And yeah, I think I'm playing the slow and steady race, I definitely feel like I've also just missed out on some pretty good opportunities. A by just not remembering to buy them on my one challenge wallet. Like sometimes I see something, I just buy it on my standard wallet because it's what I default to. And like that there's been a couple of things that were like freedom mint, or point one or point five that I would have otherwise bought on here. But also just like

Jamie:

a little lucky on the other end. Like I can't remember what it was, but something that was sort of tough to me. He tried to mint on a bunch of wallets and kind of Yeah, succeeded with this.

Roy:

That was the capsule houses, which, yeah, I mentioned one and I flipped for like point two. And then they went up a lot more. But still, I was good flip. Um, yeah, it is an eventful week for the money challenge. And yeah, what, how's your abstract to the day project going? You You told me like two days ago that you were quitting. Is that true? It's not

Jamie:

true. But it is funny how last week I was talking about how great I was feeling and how everything that I've been creating lately, I loved. I think that let's see today would have been day 121. So a week ago would have been 114 or something. And I think I did like another three or four days where I was just I was continuing to love it. And then this Thursday, I was on my iPad with my app open that I create my art in Autodesk sketchbook it's called and I was I was working for literally maybe eight hours in a row and I could not I could not make a single thing that I looked that I thought looked good and it was very frustrating and disheartening, but I guess it's just you know writer's block but for artists I guess that must be a thing because it was fucking happening to me and I hated it and it definitely made me feel like I wanted to quit but boy if if one speed bump of something like that made me quit it's it's a pretty weak thing on my half or whatever I'm not making good sentences right now. But that would be pretty embarrassing to give up. So I just kind of kept going until I made something that I felt somewhat okay with and then I that specific day actually I named a piece have affected people keep this up for over 5000 days. Yeah, I had I had been so frustrated and that was that was two days ago. I'm yesterday's peace I actually kind of liked but then today's was sort of another struggle for me but yeah, ups and downs and this week felt more down or at least the last few days because actually for the getting weekends I was saying the first like four days I kept feeling like I was making stuff that I was really happy with and it was different. But boy, oh boy, Thursday did I feel like I had no artistic talent whatsoever.

Roy:

Yeah, you really did. Tell me over and over. You're creating You're done. You're done. But obviously I knew you were joking but it Your morale was low.

Jamie:

Yeah, and it's also a thing where so we've been talking about how, as you know, if prices go up, gas goes up, that makes it tougher for cheap projects. And because I list mine at point o five, you know, if you go to buy a, an NFT, that cost point oh five, and then you see the gas is going to be another point oh, three, five, that just, you have to really, really want that NFT to still go through with that when you see that gas price. So I'm feeling a bit of that right now as well have yours

Roy:

been selling relatively quickly still. So basically,

Jamie:

between days like 30, and then this Thursday, every single one had sold within the day that I listed it, except I think, actually day one to one, which was the first day where I had jumped up to point o five price that one took like, you know, 13 hours or something. But other than that, yeah, this Thursday was the first one that didn't just sell within the first day, which was something that didn't feel good, obviously, but also is like a very minor thing in the grand scheme of things. And also, you know, so normally, the floor price for the secondary market on them has been somewhere around point one seven for a while now. And since I list them at point o five, it's obviously a much more affordable options, just get them initially. So if I end up in a situation where I have, you know, a handful or more of ones at my price, it is much more welcoming for new people coming along to grab them which is kind of nice for getting new collectors, but like open see has just recently changed their already poor search function. And it's, it's, I think it's literally impossible to type something in and actually find one of my pieces now. So the only way really to know about them, or find them is basically through having a direct link to it or seeing existing pieces in the wallets. Like if you type in the exact name of the project or an individual piece from the project, it just won't even show up in the search anymore. Because that's so heavily it's annoying as hell they're so heavily favoring verified projects that you know that they will recommend something that shares one word and is from a collection that hasn't had any activity for 19 days instead of showing the exact piece that I'm typing in the name of for my project where I'm quite consistently having one one new meant and sale a day so that that's a super bummer. But you know I I can't control open see search function so whatever Yeah, but it it was interesting to just kind of feel like a rank amateur again when I just did not make art that I felt good about after just feeling so good about the previous like 10 days stuff.

Roy:

Yeah. That in It must be tough to like every single day produce something and

Jamie:

yeah, it's it's there's definitely ups and downs and I've had days that were sort of like Thursday's but this was sort of just a next level where I was both not taking no for an answer and not being able to successfully make a piece that I could say yes. So it was just it was my stubbornness meeting my artists block head on.

Roy:

Yeah. And how do you feel now about like today's piece

Jamie:

I liked yesterday's a good amount. And I didn't like Tuesdays or Thursdays as much but I've also found that a lot of times the pieces that are, are my favorite or least favorite in the project is not really what other people think. And I actually went back and looked at Thursday's piece again, yesterday and today and I like it a lot more than I did on Thursday when I basically just said fuck it this one's gonna be fit enough and had a lot of emotions going around while I was just sort of angrily minting it. Yeah, after making 30 Other things that I didn't like. I do like it more now.

Roy:

Now I'm really curious. I haven't seen it yet. Let me see if I can do it. What day it was day one should be I think everyone day one. It reminds me a bit of one of your earlier pieces. It Yeah,

Jamie:

it actually I was doing something quite similar to what I did on day one. Yeah, but just with like a lot more success. occasion. And yes, yeah, I like it. Yeah, I'm actually be curious if you have seen the piece that I got the colors for 121 and 120 from because it was not something I'd seen before, but I loved it. You know, those generative masks? Yes, by the Japanese artist, he has another one called cityscapes that I had never heard of. And I saw somebody linked to it on Twitter. And I was like, Holy shit, that looks fucking awesome. Yeah. And the colors specifically really stood out to me. So I wanted to work with them.

Roy:

Very cool. During the event, you object to a project you wanted to touch on.

Jamie:

Now, just the artists block and the the bummer of the new search function is pretty much all I wanted to cover. All right,

Roy:

I will then talk a little bit more about a little bit about my upcoming NFT drop, which

Jamie:

more if you are going back to previous episodes? Yes. And just talking about it in general, if you're talking

Roy:

about this, yes, I think I touched on it last week. It is still happening. I spoke to the web three team that is most likely going to be developing the smart contracts and website and all that for the drop a few days ago, and it was very promising productive call. They seem very competent. They have launched a bunch of other projects successfully. So I'm feeling good about all of that side of things.

Jamie:

Are you interested in telling us any of those projects? or No?

Roy:

Ah, let me so they did the the triple eight. Drop the cycle. That's yeah, pretty big success. And two of the I think the triple eight did to airdrops and they handle that. They did um, spotty Wi Fi has a collection they had to call Okay, yeah, he's big. He's big. They did the job, the Hall of Fame goat Lodge. That was like I do. Yeah. That the project never really took off. I wasn't a part of it. So I don't know how the drop went. But I'm assuming it went well, because,

Jamie:

yeah, I don't remember hearing any. Yeah, I heard about the dropping bad.

Roy:

They did crypto playing arts. So that was like another rural side of players type cod drop with different artists doing different playing cards. I remember a lot of people hyped about that at the time. And I was kind of bummed that I missed it. Because it seemed like something I would really like, but I haven't really heard people talk about it lately. So yeah, the secret society, whales, bonehead after Order thing, Gorgons budget, things I haven't heard of, but they're doing two drops coming up that I'm very excited about. One is doodles, which is doodle dow I think they're dropping tomorrow. So by the time you're hearing this, it will have already dropped. I've seen a bit of talk about the doodles. Yeah, it's it's a really interesting project. I really like the art style, basically. And yeah, they're taking care of the web three. And then they're also doing this project coming up in a week or two called shoes with Zed, which is sort of like another one of these street wear. Shoe drops where you get utility and other things built in. Metaverse drops and all that kind of jazz. But yeah, anyway, very competent. Web three team the cold West. By the way, I

Jamie:

was looking for a much shorter answer. Just sidetrack yourself. And yeah, I thought maybe you just name a couple or go. Yeah, I don't really want to talk about that. Yeah, no,

Roy:

um, well, I like right next to me. Because when I had the meeting, I wrote down all the names. So I was like, I have all these right here. Might as well go down the list. Yes. So very excited to have them. Hopefully working on it. We're gonna finalize for the next week. The format of the drop is most likely going to be I can't remember if I mentioned it last week or not. But so from a the base entry to the lower price here Yes. For

Jamie:

your your planning, right.

Roy:

He Yes, that's what I was. And they did not that did not sound confident. Yeah, I'm contemplating removing the higher tier option basically. But I say I basically the lower tier and it may end up being the only tier is going to be point oh three, three eth to buy. It will be an open admission style drops. So you'll have say one or two weeks to go to the website, click mint. Whenever gas is low, you won't have to worry about it selling out because the total amount is going to be however many minted in that period. There's not going to be rarities that it's going to like an ERC 1155, which just means that all of the tokens will look the same. It also means that gas is going to cost less if you buy so that's another benefit for that. And it's effectively just going to be a membership token. So the give you access to private Discord server, early access to my newsletter, and potentially a bunch of other benefits. And I'm actually I have decided over the last couple of days that I'm going to make my entire discord private in that you will need. So if you have if you're in one of the first 10,000 people to join my Discord, then I'm going to give them like a special role to give them access, so they won't need to buy this token. But going forward, basically, you'll need to have the NFT to get into the discord. And I will probably find other ways to allow people in But the biggest reason for me doing this and I really didn't like plan on this and for a longest time, I'd like my disposal was going to be free. But sometime during this week, we had three accounts basically pop up and post a link to this this project and they were talking about how cool it was and how all these other accounts are buying in. And a member of the discord bought it and it turned out to be just this complete scam rug pool. And these three accounts effectively orchestrated to join discord and pretend to know each other and talk about projects and get people to to buy them. And so it in a sort of gating the discord and having this slight barrier to entry to get in it's, I think going to protect the members a bit and greatly reduce the number of scams that can take place. And especially as we scale. You know, it's 10,000 members. Now if we get to 50 to 100,000 members, it's just going to be come a huge target for scammers, and they'll get more sophisticated. And another thing that I actually yeah,

Jamie:

I had my first so I don't have my Discord DMS closed, which I probably should because it's just constant spam. But I had my first one from someone impersonating you within the last week, which was very funny. Yeah, because we talk basically all day have never done so it discord the so that was already extremely suspicious. And then they were talking in a way that did not at all sound like for instance they called me bro in 23 years of knowing me Yeah. So that was just a funny example of of the scammers and the growth of your discord or whatever, but I got a real kick. Yeah, someone trying to trick me into thinking they were you by DMing me on Discord. It's got to be the rose percentage chance. Yeah. Never gonna work. Yeah.

Roy:

Um, but yeah, so we had that happen. And yeah, so that's the reason why I'm probably gonna make the discord private, although a new idea which someone floated, which I think I can do, and I probably will, if I can, is to make it so that you can join the discord and you can read it. But in order to post then you would have to have the token and get us Yeah,

Jamie:

and you can also do like private sections of it and stuff to like, you have a lot of customization options. Just go here, right? Yeah, where you want to lock people in and out and stuff like that? Yeah.

Roy:

A lot of options. And it's, yeah, a lot of things will be made possible by having the NFT and people verifying that they can get access to certain things. So

Jamie:

yeah, probably a couple people that don't trust collab land enough, you actually use it? Do you have any concerns or work arounds related to that? Or no? Are you just saying, you know, if they don't trust it, then they're not going to get in?

Roy:

Um, I've definitely heard people. I don't know if I've heard someone saying they don't trust it. But they've certainly certainly questioned whether they should trust it or not. And

Jamie:

not that they distrust it. But that the benefits to proving that I am this person with these apes is doesn't outweigh the risk to them. So they refuse to do it. Yeah.

Roy:

I hadn't really considered a workaround to that. I think that by and large, most people in the community trust it, and we'll do it and have an

Jamie:

have. It's also like a, you know, theoretically, because this is only a point 033 ether thing. They could just stick that in a wallet that's separate from their high value stuff. Yeah, they were sufficiently fearful of this kind of thing. Yeah. And then just connected and all that would be at risk would be that. Yeah. See,

Roy:

there are workarounds. Yeah, I think that was the Oh, yeah. And we're hoping to launch mid November but you know, these things usually get delayed. So probably mid to late November is more realistic. Very accelerated basically.

Jamie:

Exactly in mid October here. So we're approximately one month that we're being told.

Roy:

Yeah, let's Yeah.

Jamie:

Well, I mean, I guess I'll have to look at the roadmap and see if humor for everybody definitely meant one.

Roy:

Cool. Yet more details to come in the future.

Jamie:

Yeah. Cool. Cool. That's it. I think that wraps us up, right. Yeah. This has been episode 11 of two board apes. Thanks again for listening. Thank you. Oh, hang on. Oh, we used to do like a little plug section Do you want to do you want to do and, I mean, we've sort of done our consistent everyday plugs, we sort of turn that into this last segment. But anything else you want to talk about? Huh? Somebody else's something something. So I want to cancel this recording out this last 20 seconds and then do a separate segment?

Roy:

No, I can find someone to plug something to play. It's a project that doesn't have much attention, but I think is very cool. It's called sunblocks. And you can find out more about it by going I think, to sunblocks.XYZ. We'll put a link in the show notes. And it's basically another AI ArtStyle project. And it's created by this person. I think he I think it's a he and he has basically been a photographer for a long time, I think over 12 years. He's taken 3000 photos of sunsets and sunrises. And he's now like using those photos to train an AI to create new images, interesting sunsets and sunrises. Yeah, it's really cool and interesting. And they did a launch maybe a week or two ago and sold out. I want to say 500 of them. And so 500 of these images that are not real photos, but they look a lot like photos of sunrises and sunsets. And the mean price is very low point two or something. And it's still quite cheap and secondary. And he's now crowdsourcing the next stage of the the training and basically getting asking for like 1000 people to send in photos that they've taken off sunsets and sunrises and using that to train the next iteration. And if you send the photo in, you effect effectively will get one free mint in the next collection. So it's like, we've spoken a lot about ways to get free value or value in the NFT space. If you don't have a lot of money, go out take a photo of a sunset or a sunrise, send it to this guy. You'll get a free mint. And you know, it's probably worth point or 3.5 Maybe. Definitely worth checking out.

Jamie:

Yeah, that sounds cool. I'm actually thinking in my head of the photos I've taken. I think my my best sunset photo was when we were on Okinawa, I took the nice one of the sunset and that I think I might actually be sticking into this project. Excellent. That's that's cool.

Roy:

Yeah. What would you like to blog?

Jamie:

I did not have anything in mind. So I'm going to try and think of something quick here. Oh, nothing's coming to me fast. I have nothing else.

Roy:

Okay, that's acceptable.

Jamie:

I have nothing to plug. Alright, this

Roy:

has been episode 11.

Intro:

Thanks for listening. Bite to low res talking. T, V T, V. Two random stuff.