Two Bored Apes - NFT Podcast

Episode 20 - Twitter Q & A (3)

December 14, 2021 Two Bored Apes
Two Bored Apes - NFT Podcast
Episode 20 - Twitter Q & A (3)
Show Notes Transcript

Episode 20 of Two Bored Apes is the third Twitter Q & A episode. Jaime and Roy answer a myriad of questions on topics including diversity and inclusivity in the space, the recent acquisition of RTKFT by Nike, as well as Art Blocks, Thingdoms, and Crypto Covens.

SHOW NOTES
Expansion Punks
Thingdoms
Crypto Coven
Altered State Machine - AIFA

Nike acquires RTFKT News
Vitiligo  Trait on RTFKT CloneX

Art Blocks - Incomplete Control by Tyler Hobbs
Art Blocks - Bent by ippsketch

Jaime's Art Gallery
Roy's Art Gallery

Jaime's Twitter
Roy's Twitter

Jamie:

The hosts of Two Bored Apes are not registered investment advisors. The podcast is for entertainment and informational purposes only. Nothing said on it should be construed as investment advice.

Intro:

Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh

Jamie:

Welcome to Episode 20 of Two Bored Apes. I'm your host, Jamie. I'm here with my friend and cohost, Roy. Roy, how are you?

Roy:

Twitter Q&A.

Jamie:

Twitter Q&A.

Roy:

I am. Well, I was gonna say I'm all talked out. That's not a good thing to say at the beginning a podcast, but I did

Jamie:

It's not. But you did start Episode Two by going "I'm sick of NFT's". And we've made it to here.

Roy:

Yeah, I just finished a Twitter Spaces that went for like two hours. And just before that I had like two meetings. And anyway, I'm good. I'm good. I'm very much in the NFT zone right now. How are you?

Jamie:

I'm good. I don't know that I'm, as in the NFT zone as you perhaps but I'm good. I hopefully I can get in the NFT zone, though, because we've got a lot of questions about them. Shall we do it? Let's write our first question is from Emily V. Emily V says, Have you seen more inclusivity in the NFT slash web3 space lately for marginalized communities? And how do you see that evolving over time? Are there other spaces or projects that are exciting you in that area of focus?

Roy:

So one that immediately comes to mind for me is expansion punks, which minted out last night, so probably a few days before, where if you listen to this, if you listen to it, when it was released, it doesn't matter. It was a project that launched in I think August, maybe July, so quite a while ago, and it sold like a couple 1000 And then did very little for a few months. And then I guess a lot of attention got put on it last night because of some Twitter spaces, and they finally sold out. And it's sort of like a punk derivative project. Like many many many projects out there.

Jamie:

I inferred that from the name. Yeah.

Roy:

Are you familiar with it at all?

Jamie:

I am not.

Roy:

Okay, so the

Jamie:

at least not by name perhaps, I saw them I would.

Roy:

They have yellow backgrounds. It's called expansion punks. I think maybe expansion punks.com Yeah, expansion punks.com. Basically, it's exactly what Emily V was asking about. I'm going to read from their website. It says there a community led expansion to the crypto punks phenomena that empowers everyone to feel welcomed, valued and represented in the emerging Metaverse honoring the ethos of the original collections, design philosophies and trade principles. The expansion punks are fully unique and diverse additions to the punk verse. So they basically said, you know, the original collection was not all that diverse, you know, women were underrepresented, and other areas were underrepresented. So they said, you know, we're going to create another 10,000. And I think the numbered them like 10,001, to 20,000. So trying to position themselves as the next 10,000 punks. And they sort of they put a lot of work into the algorithm to ensure that none of the outputs were like the same as any of the original 10k punks. And then they added like a yellow background to make it very certain that you know, this is not just to be confused with original punk. And yeah, they saw that last night. And that immediately came to mind as a project that is sort of focusing on the inclusivity issue, or factor of the NFT space. Hmm, I saw it.

Jamie:

A couple days ago, somebody had tweeted that, I believe it's this clone X project, actually, from artifact two has been all over the NFT news lately included a vitiligo trait, which is a skin disorder, basically where you have sort of, like patchy skin. I'm sure you would recognize people that have it. But anyway, that's that's definitely an example of it. That that is top of mind right now. I think. It's it's sort of an interesting question. I think a lot of what we see like, if you look at, say, the punk floor, a lot of people will talk about how it's traditionally the darker skinned punks that are sitting on the floor. And then you sort of have people talking about whether or not that pertains to racism, which it seems kind of ludicrous to suggest that it doesn't to me, but I you know, different people have different definitions of racism. But I think this space is one well positioned to be inclusive, but it's just an area right now that takes kind of so much excess time and capital and stuff, that the same sort of, you know, societal institutional structural racism that prevents minorities from from getting ahead in general is going to be preventing them from being able to splash around in this area ahead of time. And so I can see it, even though it has sort of the technological capabilities of being empowering, I can see it just being another way for the people that are already ahead in society to be able to compound that advantage.

Roy:

Yeah, I think I pretty much agree with that, like, especially if we're talking... go on

Jamie:

I just I just want to expand on a little bit is that you know, the, the idea that you can literally be totally anonymous, especially as you know, theoretically, in the future that pertains to work and governance and all sorts of different important things that are really integral to your space in society, the ability to be literally totally anonymous with just you know, you have a wallet address, and that's it is going to make it so much harder for people to be discriminated against, because you you won't even know who they are. Well, and

Roy:

here's another interesting point, do you think because it seems like we're all gonna be running around in the metaverse with like, these new identities? Do you think things like having an ape avatar will give you beneficial social status and then say having a low A TIA peripheral picture? Avatar is going to be looked down upon and discriminated against in that way?

Jamie:

I would say I mean, the word discriminate is maybe a little bit. Yeah, light and heavy. But But certainly, there's got to be a difference on status. There's definitely I mean, if you see somebody that has a punk avatar versus a lazy lion avatar, there's a perceptual difference of who that is, and when they got involved and what their social status is, for sure.

Roy:

I love how the lazy lions just get, like the default go to shit on community now, which, you know,

Jamie:

they're successful enough to be still around and people representing them. You know, it's like, it's not even relevant to say something like misfits or whatever, because nobody's identifying as a miss. Yeah, whatever. Yeah, but lazy lions is sort of a good one, I think. Yeah, me too. All right. I think that that kind of ends. But yeah, Blasi said,

Roy:

You've mentioned how playing poker helped you develop a healthy disassociation from money? Could you expound on this a bit in the context of NFT's ie, house slash When do you think about placing profits elsewhere? Etc? Hashtag not financial advice. Yeah, this is something I've spoken about before, do you do you have something because you also came come from a background? Yeah,

Jamie:

I think that, you know, as you go up in poker, especially if you come from, you know, a family that is not rich, for instance, if you succeed, you start all of a sudden playing for amounts of money that are very crazy to what you used to just, you know, be used to for money. But you kind of learned that you're just sort of making decisions, and you're trying to make the best decision based on the information you have. And the numbers may grow as time goes on. But the the decision making, that you are doing is irrespective of how many zeros are on the right of the number, for instance, and I think there's definitely been a lot of that in NFT's certainly where, you know, it's, you're already in a, an area that so many people think is totally ludicrous. Just at all, like, you know, if you talk to people that think that NFT's are stupid, the idea of spending $3 for a boarding to them is absolutely ridiculous. So then to look at the actual prices of some of this higher end stuff, you have to be able to just think a little bit more so about, you know, the implications of it, the scarcity, that the value, the utility, all this sort of thing, in a way that is, you know, respecting how transformative that technology potentially is. Because if you if you're just constantly translating back to US dollars, and what you can get with those in the in the meat world as we call it in the metaverse, you're going to probably be slowed down for me Making some otherwise correct decisions that you might make if you were able to disassociate.

Roy:

Yeah, and you probably just drive yourself insane, you'll go crazy if you're constantly thinking about the quote unquote real world value of, of these JPEGs. And all these things, especially if you're like trading on an active basis, or even semi active. Similar to like with poker, if you're in a pot, and, you know, you're trying to think logically, but then all of a sudden, the chips in front of you, you start thinking, that's rent, that's, you know, my car payment, that's food, that's a holiday, you know, all these kind of things, it's very difficult to think logically, and to make the best decision, you're thinking, Oh, I don't want to risk losing this, this, this could be a vacation that this could be, you know, I need this to pay for it. Once you start thinking like that, it's very difficult to think rationally. So to be successful, a poker very quickly or, in some cases takes a while, but you eventually learn to have this healthy disassociation of money where you can't completely stop caring about it, because then you'll just, you know, it's nothing, you go all in, you lose your money, it doesn't matter to you. So you have to care about it to some extent, but you can't care about it. So much. So that you're, you're just agonizing over every decision and construct thinking in real world terms. It's like, yeah, in poker, money and chips are a tool in a way that is very similar to investing in NFT's.

Jamie:

Yeah, and you also like, to go back a little bit to that poker analogy. You know, if you look at in the context of like, the pot odds, for instance, if you're, if you're looking at calling a bet on the river, where you're getting four to one or five to one, you're basically making a decision where you are pretty confident you're I'm about to lose this money, like, I'm making this call expecting to lose more often than not. So that can be even more intimidating if the money is is significant in the real world to you. But you go, Well, you know, I think I'm going to lose this money 73% of the time, but the math dictates that I am going to make money as long as I'm right, you know, some other percentage of the time that's a little bit off from that, and I believe I am, you know, it's okay, that I'm going to lose this 73% of the time, because I only need to be winning it, you know, 12% of the time to make this a profitable call in the long run, even though this individual time may not work out. And that that kind of thing. certainly has some applications, if you're you know, getting in the minting game, where the project may or may not make it but you know, you have a bit of an eye to flipping and if you get a rare, you're going to be able to get multiple, all sorts of stuff like that definitely has, you know, implications for the way that math kind of works out there, where you might be thinking, just let's just give specific examples like minting, cool cats and Bored Apes, right? Even if you ahead of time had some sort of knowledge that you had a 90% chance that these were going to zero somehow magically, you know, they would have turned out to be fantastic, fantastic things to buy. If the 10% of the time that they didn't go to zero, they went to where we've seen them go to. So you're just kind of looking at situations where maybe you're, you're gonna lose money more often than not, but the amount that you can win or make when you do is so significant, that you have to be okay with the idea that you're potentially losing money on this on this purchase.

Roy:

Yep, I think that that should answer that hashtag not financial advice. Yeah.

Jamie:

rice farmer says question for both of you. What are your top three individual artblocks pieces that you own?

Roy:

That is a tough question, at least for me. Do off the top of your head know yours.

Jamie:

Off the top of my head, I would definitely say stipple sunsets 112 is one of them. For sure. It's the second NFT I ever minted. The first one was stipple sunsets 111, which I looked at and didn't like that much. The palette was not really for me. And then so I I was just excited to get into it, though, and immediately minted another one and then I got 112. And I friggin loved it. And I still do. I actually just bought a Christmas ornament today with it on it to sort of help commemorate this crazy year. But yeah, that that's the first one that comes to mind. And then after that, I would say elementals number 369 definitely still has a special place for me. And I really love both my spring and summer fragments right now. So those would definitely be up there. And I really liked my pig my my tip instead I bought on the secondary. Yeah, but I'll stop there for now.

Roy:

All right. I'll say my fidenza It's number 291. It's just like, I do really,

Jamie:

first of all, it's a Fidenza. Yeah,

Roy:

it's a fidenza. Like that, in and of itself is just like, crazy. I had, I minted four, I sold three. So it was kind of brutal, but like, I still have a fidenza. So I'm very, you did

Jamie:

great. You're doing great. But yeah, I do remember the first maybe six episodes of this podcast like that. That specific fact came up every time. I brought it up recently, so I just forgot how

Roy:

Yeah, that I'm looking at it right now. It it really looks nice. I really like it's got like the soft shapes feel. It's got one of the rare palettes. It's got some nice pink red colors to control anyway, I really like that one. That's definitely it probably is my overall favorite, but definitely top three. I really like ecchi monopolists 471 It's

Jamie:

that's your your pro Twitter profile background.

Roy:

Almost. So I have two ekim INNOPOLIS that have like a purple background. My Twitter profile is 568 My the one I just mentioned is 471. It's a it's it was my very first ever secondary market. Like snipe slash purchase of artblocks like in the immediate aftermath of a mint. Normally, this happened very much like more aggressively back in the day when artblocks would sell out and like just that'd be a couple hours or like an hour and a half of crazy secondary market action when people like listing and the floor was going up and then people were trying to snipe them and then we'll come back down and people trying to you know play that sort of flipping game which happens less so now with a Dutch auctions. But yeah, this one I just saw it. I didn't check rarities or anything. I just saw it. I was like, Hey, that looks awesome. I think it was like, I don't know, one eth 1.2 or something on the border. And it turned out it was very rare. Mm, the floor ran up to like 20 eth and like 50 eth for this particular rarity, but it was never really only caused me to want to sell it just because I love the look of it. And I still do. And yeah, so that's two. What's another one that I really like? Um, I really like a meridian 667 That's probably I mean, yeah, I have fragments of an infinite field. My archetype or it's I'm like scrolling through my gallery. So the gallery right now like this. This just, there's just so many good art books, projects that I love so many.

Jamie:

I'm gonna look at your meridian right now. Yeah.

Roy:

Yes. 667 and 536. My two most people tend to prefer the other one the 536 but I really love just the clean...

Jamie:

536?

Roy:

Yeah.

Jamie:

I don't like those ones that have that many different colors. That's, uh, yeah, least favorite type of Okay. of

Roy:

meridian. Yeah, well, 67 is like one color palette.

Jamie:

Yeah, like that one better. Yeah. So I still it's, it's it is though a little bit. Like flat. I like the ones where the texture really makes it look more 3d and more like, like, this is one of the ones where it's getting so abstracted. It looks less like the geographical forms that he's going for. Like, he kind of has that spectrum where it goes from like, like those charcoal ones where it really looks like it's showing you mountains to these other ones where it just looks like kind of bands of different colors. And I tend to like the ones that have that texture more. But this I definitely like 667 more than your other one.

Roy:

Yeah. All right. Well, I think that's kind of

Jamie:

even though I already exceeded your he said, Oh, yeah, Event Horizon sunset number 390, which I've dubbed the dive bomber. I'm just a really big fan of that one. Like that collection. It's kind of I would say under the radar. It's a factory project. So kind of all of them are under the radar. But that one I think looks really great. Amazing. I mean, I could go on to a bunch of these. Yeah, yeah. We can just link

Roy:

to our gallery gallery too. So galleries so true. Yeah. I've been slowly adding to mine. Anyway, Catina tour says, I finally

Jamie:

it's not how I would pronounce

Roy:

I know I asked them on a it was 30 spaces or like an AMA. And then like the next two times, I got it wrong yet, but I knew like I used to say a cave and then I was like, yeah, and then I was like Is it Catana ADA Kate Katyn and but now it's definitely Katana Tour. So anyway, question, how do you feel the Thingdoms's mint went? What are your thoughts about the art and project as a whole post reveal? And then he says I'm clearly biased as evidenced by my Haiku. do good things with me. Infinite thing items await for all thingy things. Ah, yeah, I appreciate the hi curry. I think we should make it a requirement that every Twitter question going forward comes with a haiku. Uh, but that would be cool. How do I think the Thingsdom mint went? Are you aware of it? Did you participate in it?

Jamie:

I did not participate in it. I'm just I'm looking at them now. Hmm. They didn't come onto my radar.

Roy:

I think the men itself went well, it was the gas was really really low, which is always awesome. Like so many projects. Now. I've sort of figured out how to mint ERC 720 ones without like, oh, just just with like, 20% of the gas costs that everyone was doing for like, most of this year to that it's just cool to see projects continuing to do that. Yeah, like presale. Most people like, bought their allocation, and then public sales so that in two minutes, it was a bit of a gas war. But it wasn't crazy. Like I overpaid in gas and still, like .1 eth. Mint. It cost me point one, eight in total per Mint for the three, which, you know, if we go back a few months, gas wells were getting up to like one eth per minute for things like doodles and other other projects. So

Jamie:

FVCKCrystals. I remember that being a bad one. Yeah, that was a bad one.

Roy:

A sevens. Oh, anyway. So in terms of like the the actual drop, I think when it's move, cold, people probably were unhappy with it as always, but by and large, I think it went well. And then the reveal, I really love the art like I have three. And they're just fun that fun. They when they are different. I like the art style. I like the characteristics and the personalities of basically all the ones I've seen, perhaps the The only criticism I would have is as a collection as a whole. There's not like potentially a ton of diversity. Like if you're looking at the profile pictures on Twitter, it might be easy for them to blend together and not necessarily stand out.

Jamie:

Yeah, I was wondering how much of that has to do with, like, you know, I definitely have given that criticism for projects before but I wonder how much of that is just the project not being around for a while and then like someone's sort of personality developing around that as their profile picture. And then you kind of just recognize it as being Oh, that's that's Frank's thing dumb. You know what I mean? When it's when it's new, and it's not necessarily your community, it's it seems much easier, whereas I think probably they become more desert discernable over time.

Roy:

Yeah, I think there's definitely, like elements of both going on. I mean, even now, like sometimes Bored Apes blend together for me, like, depending on the background, the background color is the same as another one. It's just like, it's hard to tell, but then there are certain apes, obviously, he was like, oh, that's definitely, you know, so and so's eight. Um, yeah, I mean, let me see what the question is. And the project as a whole. I mean, I'm just I'm a fan of the project. I really like what they're doing. I think the way that they executed on the mint was good. The thing FM is just awesome. It's like this. I'm not sure if you're familiar with Jamie but it's like his radio station that they've got going in the discord server 24/7 And it's like an actual legit radio station like the two What do you call them? Just jockeys. Radio? Yes. Yeah. Are like they they work out of like

Jamie:

our next question is coming from the same person. an actual studio in. I don't know where actually. But yeah, and then created like this whole thing into a meme where they get people to send in like, like little fake adverts, and just questions and it's just awesome. And it's like, it's the pulse of the NFT space. Like I listened to it a lot. And I think it'll be really cool if slash when we can just have that in like the Zen Academy Discord server, but just a radio channel that people can tune into. Yeah, I'm excited for the future. I think they have the ability to do cool things and build cool things and they have a strong passionate community. I think that the the fact that the floor price is roughly around Mint is kind of just a testament or like us statement on the the state of the market at the moment, which is just projects aren't going parabolic anymore. It's just such a different market to like, even a month ago, a little in five months ago. So um, yeah, I'm still bullish. I like the project. I like the app. I like the team like community. I have a lot to like about the thingdoms. Okay, They said is bent an even better buy at this discounted price? Or is there any news slash concerns slash issues that I'm missing? Thanks

Roy:

I just had a look at it. It's Wow, it's point six two,

Jamie:

which is not that I mean, it was one it never really got much above two point one did it? Yeah. Oh, yeah. Yeah, for a little bit, I guess it did. Yeah. That was shortly then it seemed just hanging around one for a lot long. Yeah. It seems like, again, we've talked about just in general, the market's inability to send every new project sky. And I think, you know, even more specifically, when you're talking about an ecosystem within an ecosystem like artbox, in the liquidity of newish projects, gets kind of sucked out to meet new ones, and get sucked out to chase the new one that happens to be hot at the time. So right now that happens to be gazers. And I guess, I would guess that van is paying a little bit of the price of people that are trying to get into gazers and not miss it. But you know, certainly if you want to buy a bent as a piece of art, which it is, yeah, it's definitely a better deal here than it was a week ago at a higher price. Yeah, there's no there, there aren't news or concerns or issues that you're missing. As long as you you know, are we're already aware of the existing artbox Fudd, which is what, that there's a lot of pieces of it. So this applies not just staying where it is permanently. You know, and obviously, that doesn't apply specifically, you're not making more bets. But people that are concerned about our plots, ability to maintain prices in general, generally cite the fact that well, there's a new curator project every week, and they have all these factory projects. There's just too many pieces. Yes, sort of the argument.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, I pretty much agree with all that. I like the collection. I'm looking at it right now. I'm tempted to buy some, but I

Jamie:

actually just opened like three tabs of ones. There's stairs that are near the floor. And that's yeah, it's an attractive and rare trait. So yeah. My I opened a couple tabs on those

Roy:

353 337 Yeah,

Jamie:

I'm a fan. I like I like that art. Where the, the color has a gradient from like the top of the canvas to the bottom. Those look really nice to me. Oh, and also just that I actually don't know the name of the trait, but the ones where the the lines themselves, you can kind of see the texture almost almost like the soft shapes feel from fidenza where you can kind of almost see the paintbrush made that made them I'm a fan of that as well. Yeah.

Roy:

I'm looking at the stairs now. Like there's only 27 of them. The flow goes from point nine my i Oh, you do? Okay. Yeah. Oh, boy.

Jamie:

I think like number three is one of them. And Roger has a I don't understand how that guy always gets such great deals. His looks awesome. Yeah, it does. And he has a he has a watercolor dream. That is so sad that I I bid like six or seven eath on it. Oh, whoa. weeks back nice. Like I'm not I'm not doing Yeah, I rarely see him so anyway, yeah, the flow goes like

Roy:

point 9.95 2.1 3.2 for the stairs. So yeah, cool collection. I like them. I'm probably gonna personally wait and hope it dips more before buying in because I've been buying look decent amount of books created lately but yeah.

Jamie:

Alpert.eth meow Steen asks the obvious question, what does this Nike news mean to you? Would you have preferred Nike make their own attempt at a project? To me this was bold, but also absolutely brilliant by Nike and artifact. Now the commercial rights thing makes a lot more sense.Thank you.

Roy:

Yeah, I mean, literally, just before we started recording, before we were looking at this question, Jamie and I were just talking about the sort of the scandal going on with all this that's unfolding, sort of, at the moment about insider trading, like someone knew that this artifact and Nike

Jamie:

or equivalent of insider trading. Yeah, I guess it has to be a security to be insider trading, I guess. Certainly the equivalent.

Roy:

Yeah. So someone had information about this acquisition ahead of time and bought up, I think, literally tweeted out saying I put my entire net worth into artifacts, you know, and then dumped them all after the news. Yeah, so that's the thing,

Jamie:

but let's let's Yeah, separate from that and just talk about the news. Right? Yeah.

Roy:

Would you have preferred Nike make their own attempt at a project? What does the news mean to you? Um, I think it's, as far as I'm aware, the first big acquisition we've had of a big company acquiring a big NFT project. So it's sort of like a historical and a monumental moment. For all those reasons. I think it's it was somewhat inevitable that was going to eventually happen. I don't get I do expect this to happen this soon. And probably not with these two companies.

Jamie:

It doesn't really buy many other companies. That's that's not really part of their model all that much. I think they bought like maybe converse and and Michael Jordan's thing, something like that and a couple others, but it's pretty fucking significant for sure.

Roy:

It is a big deal. Yeah.

Jamie:

I think it means that we've all largely been right that this isn't a totally ridiculous scam or fad, right? Yeah, it's just more confirmation of that. Yeah, more confirmation at the institutions are coming. Yep. Six, five to nine was right. Yeah, for sure. I think that I was thinking that I'm going to use that as an answer to a question later. I remember correctly. But anyway, Would you have preferred Nike make their own attempt at a project? I don't think so. Feels like a lot of these corporate projects are pretty similar. In that they're just kind of going here's like a NFT souvenir of Pepsi. Here's an NFT souvenir of this and that, and they all seem kind of interchangeable in that way. So this is sort of a more interesting dynamic maneuver by them to me.

Roy:

I prefer this than more than if Nike had said hey, we're gonna do a drop his 50,000 shoes. Yes, I'm sign up to a raffle system and you can buy them for $50 Each, or $500 Each or whatever. I do

Jamie:

think I remember them having acquired some patents regarding digital footwear. So I'm, I am concerned about them. Now, using this as a way to prevent other people from competing with them, specifically like that. 10KTFK or whatever. We are going to make it son. Yes. Something like that. Like, I would just hate to see them go oh, you actually can't do that.

Roy:

Yeah, yeah, we're gonna see a lot of that in the next five years, like IP battles between big corporations and between, you know, web3 Native Corporation Yeah,

Jamie:

definitely. An individual's

Roy:

Yeah. All that's how to be much at all yet. Yeah. Sort of like the biggest thing is like love loves versus funks I guess. And that's it hasn't really escalated to getting to court I guess. I think the DMC notice was about as far as it got so far. Yeah. Yeah.

Jamie:

And Vincent bandos also kind of dealing with that with there's like Battle versus the free pure for Yeah, that's funny. And interesting. Two questions from now I'm sorry. I was gonna skip is the one that relates to six five to nines thing but

Roy:

we can just jump to that question because

Jamie:

yeah, yeah. Doctor Batman. Doctor mad but you should have

Roy:

a alright. So this doctor here, don't tell you. He's giving me you should take it. Oh my god.

Jamie:

Wow, Dr. Birdman says worried with Nike stepping in and I'm sure meta slash Facebook will take the same approach then to the space. How do we maintain the integrity and culture of web3 with big corporates? knocking at the door?

Roy:

I've been talking for like the last seven hours. My tongue

Jamie:

your tongue was swollen? Yeah. Yeah. So this is the question where six five t nines famous saying don't let the institution steal your JPEGs came to mind? First and foremost.

Roy:

Yeah. What do you basically infer that he means by that or they mean by that?

Jamie:

Um, that well, because he had a whole big thing about how the difference between me well okay, I'm kind of inferring based on the punks. Gender but anyway, 6529.

Roy:

pulling you out, because you did with me with I know. I know. I know. I know. previous episode Yeah.

Jamie:

Was basically discussing the difference between a fungible token and a non fungible token in that when the institutions came and started buying up Bitcoin and Etherium and stuff like that. It didn't really matter if you didn't want to sell because they could always just find another buyer. But ultimately, no matter how badly Nike or Facebook or whatever wants, you know, stipple sunset 112 to go back a few questions. I can just choose not to sell it to them. And we have a lot of power because of that. And ultimately, I Think six five to nine is sort of saying that we need to use our ability to hold dearly to either, you know, make crazy life changing money when we do sell to them. But more so to be able to resist the early comings of them in order to maintain the the sort of open nature of it that we want, rather than just kind of capitulating the first time they offer and dangle any money in front of our faces. I agree.

Roy:

I'm going to go on record and say that if Harvard wants to buy Zen Academy, no, Zen Academy

Jamie:

is not for sale. Okay.

Roy:

You hear that Harvard? Yeah, that'll show. Um, but yeah, no, I It's interesting, though, like, I earn a clone x, which is an artifact drop. And now Nike owns artifact. So in a way, I have this now relationship with Nike, which I'd never signed up for. I didn't know about initially. And yes, I still own my NFT. But now like the direction of the project, and company is intertwined with my NFT. And the value of it is somewhat intertwined. So it is an interesting situation when an institution comes and like, what if, I don't know Facebook, not the yoga labs would have sell. But they offer a trillion dollars to Yuga Labs, and they sell and then all of a sudden, Facebook owns a Bored Apes Yacht Club. That, I guess is where things get interesting, and like us, as individual apes have to be like, No, you don't we're gonna do our own thing now with our right. But I don't really see that happening with with the artifact community, I guess, I think that it is just now intertwined with Nike.

Jamie:

Yeah. And they had some, you know, over the last week or so because the clone drop was just very recently, a lot of people in the space, were not pleased about the way that went down, including me, started with basically then canceling the Dutch auction. And then there was the two different licensing agreements. Yeah, the fact that those weren't shown to the mintors until after the fact. All that was bad. And then you had this sort of insider scandal, which is, that's, that's not really a decision, that's just an individual. So I don't think you can fault them so much for that. But the specific decisions that they made, were a little bit, I would say, maybe not super web three ish. And then for them to sell to an existing brand, like Nike kind of just continues them down that path, even though their artifact is a pretty sort of old and established web three presence. It seems like in the lead up to this Nike thing. They were starting to sort of regress a little bit. Yeah, I think so. I mean, yeah, it's they they were getting a lot of bad.

Roy:

I mean, did you see the thing as well, like, um, I don't know who it was from artifact, but like one of the leaders that high up in the project, basically, when they finally did sell out, he just tweeted this arrogant thing. Yeah, something like that, either. How's that for fudder? Or something just

Jamie:

right. Yeah, fuck you. Exactly. Yeah. But congratulations to them for getting acquired for a shitload of money by Nike, I guess.

Roy:

Yeah. We don't know how much it was right. But we just

Jamie:

we do not and ludicrous amount. Yeah. Which is also sort know of a an anti web3 thing. It is yeah, we're all about we're supposed to see all these on chain.

Roy:

Scan for the artifact thing.

Jamie:

Um, you know, what I did see on Twitter, though, that was kind of interesting is somebody was saying, you know, Adidas bought an Ape, Nike bought artifact. And I think they mentioned a couple other things. And they said, what's the common denominator? And it was Etherium they're all it's all stuff that's on Etherium.

Roy:

Yeah, no,

Jamie:

I love that. That's really cool.

Roy:

Bullish even though that's the room tank today.

Jamie:

Oh, my God. Yeah, it's not doing great. What do we

Roy:

I should not be checking Etherium price. Let's the next question. Oh, let's go back to the previous one rather, which we skipped over. Mike McKay. NFT says how long? How long did Jaime brag for getting the bounty a week ago, referring to the poker tournament where you knocked me out and got Bernie. I did not really close because we knocked you out go to dump Bernie. Or is he still bragging? But for real? What was it about the crypto Coven that drew you in? You actually didn't brag anywhere near as much as I thought you would know I was very reasonable about it. 2012 Jamie like I would have heard about it 40 times by now. But 2021 Jamie is a little more subdued. And dare I say mature? Yeah. So the second part of the question, what was it about the cryptocarbon that drew you in. So the cryptocarbon is an NFC project, which it actually I think it released a month plus ago and had sort of a slow burn sell out that they sort of had this like presale thing where if you were in the discord, you got to like level one. So it was like just minimal activity, you just have to post once or twice, you could go to the website and mint at I think point o five. And then in early December, they opened up the public sale, which was at point o seven, which was triggered based on after they sold out a certain amount, it would go up in price a little bit. And I heard about it when it was the point I find someone in the 333 brought it up. And I just didn't look into it that much. Yeah, I didn't. But then let's say about three days ago, so another member in the 333 brought up the project and said, You know, I was initially skepticism about how the mid worked, they only had one kg discord members. And then it was like I take it back, the project has been steadily growing. It's got an old woman team, it's super inclusive. It's got great lore there that the tech is awesome. And links to like a article about how they use the AI to like add descriptions for every single NFT gas is really low. I was like, All right, let me let me take a look at it. And then I looked at the website, I joined the discord a very well thought out project, the art is pretty cool. The lore is very cool. The tech is cool. Like I read the articles, and it's like it's just it's very clear that a ton of work had been put into it. And the community was just rock solid. Like I joined the discord and it was buzzing. Even though the head of small community vibes were very good. Everyone was having a good time. Despite you know, this project had been slow minting for a month plus hadn't minted out. No one cared like they were just enjoying the project for what it was. in the secondary market was above the mid price, which is almost unheard of for a project that's been sitting out for a month without minting. Like if you go on mint and enlist at higher if you wanted to just no one was doing that. And it just seemed like this. Just hidden gem basically. And so I just I started minting and I mentored a bunch. And yeah, I really liked the project. It's one of the do projects in like the last I don't know five months where I've I actually been excited for the reveal. Whereas most projects, I mean, like when I first got into a teaser was like all about minting what it was going to look like. And then it got into, like so much about there's the money in the trading and the flipping in the investment. And then if forgot about that, and then it was just fun and exciting to get back to a project that that I liked. Yeah, that's a lot of reasons. Did you? Did you look at it at all.

Jamie:

I think you had sent me a link. And I looked very, very briefly at it. But I was in New York City just doing real life stuff. So

Roy:

I the stuff. Yeah. But yeah, it's cool project, they actually did a couple of at least one brand new thing that I'd never heard of in the contract, which is interesting and probably worth repeating. They effectively pre approved all their tokens for trading on open sea in the ground. So if you want to list you don't have to pay gas, which sounds awesome. It is awesome. There's potentially some risk, potentially. I mean, there's been a lot of noise in the last couple of days about how people are worrying about having given open sea access to essentially interact with their assets. If they then go to a malicious third party site, you could inadvertently sign something that then lists your token really, really low. And yes, that that is I guess a risk. Um but yeah, it's just like if you go to a third party going and

Jamie:

going on this website is a risk but that isn't

Roy:

something without really knowing it's just an another attack vector. But yeah, I think that this having the open sea, um, approval transaction baked into the minting contract, and just let people know that that is it's just noise in the end the gas was associated to mint like maybe it was like $15 per NFT I don't even know how small that isn't eath is like point or something that is crazy. Yeah, I mean, so many projects are doing it thing thing them's that it cost like the in the presale man. There's like $26 breach and it's just like It's great to see.

Jamie:

I guess somebody really did get in contact with the app. devs and fix

Roy:

it. Yeah, I mean, gas has been lower but like the the contracts have just gotten so much better people have figured out it's been both new clever ways. Um, yeah, that's that's basically it with cryptoCovins floors, about 2X mint. I love it. Um, I have a bunch all down intention of selling. It did sell out. Yeah, it's sort of just started, you know, that usual snowball effect once the project gets to like, 70%. Right. It's relatively quick. It's Tommy starts hitting. Yeah, it took like 24 hours to get from like, 50% to like, 75% and then like, six hours to sell out. Um, yeah, cool project. I like it. I'm a fan. I'm enjoying being in the discord and yeah, only good things to say.

Jamie:

Talmadge Tallmadge, O'Neil says thoughts on incomplete control.

Roy:

In complete control is the is an artblocks drop by Tyler Hobbes, who is famous for fidenza. The most I would say the most famous artblock strop the highest floor, most coveted, etc, etc. And yeah, this is his next art blocks dropped since then, and there was obviously impossible to uphold expectations, just it's like how do you top fidenza The collection was, is limited to 100 items. So fidenza was 999. This is 100. Much, much smaller, obviously. And we can get to the drop mechanics and all that kind of stuff. But let's leave that to the side and just talk about

Jamie:

I think we already got into the drum. Yeah, when it was first announced and stuff. I'll say

Roy:

I'm, I'm underwhelmed with the actual outputs. I think individually, they look appealing, like if you if you look, look at them, like really blown up and higher resolution, and then like, yeah, I find them appealing. I would like more diversity within, like, they all have the exact same color background, which to me, I don't know, at first glance, at least I haven't spent a lot of time with the collection, I haven't looked through a ton of them and tried to compare, but like it just they all look kind of the same, which Yeah, it's, yeah, that's, that's it? What do you think? Um, I

Jamie:

would basically agree with that it's, so the mid size is only 100. So that's when you're talking about diversity of algorithms. If if you make the algorithm very diverse in a, in a collection, that's only 100 It's sort of hard to keep the cohesiveness throughout the collection. But there there is a lot of sameness throughout it also looks like there's basically one he said there's just the one background color, but also the palette of the of the colors within it. You know, there's like seven or eight colors and it's it's some combination of all of them in basically each piece. I do think individually like a lot of them are pleasant to look at nice composition nice colors to me, but you know, as as far as the expectations that he set with fidenza I think largely speaking, most people are not looking at it and going wow, this is this is even better. Like you're not hearing that. Certainly, yeah. That's a tough fucking it is. Yeah. For the expectations to be your project is going to be as good as the most revered generative project of all time.

Roy:

History. Yeah, I'm looking at a couple now. And I'm liking the more as always, yeah, love artblocks. Yeah,

Jamie:

I find I like the ones that do have more of the different colors that I was talking about. And a little bit more in terms of the number of different colors and also more in terms of their covering more of the background, because it can be a little bit. I mean, I'm gonna look for some individual pieces like number 41, for instance, there's just not enough there for me color wise to, to really appreciate what's going on. But also like the premise of the project was about how when you're doing computer art, generative computer art, it's also perfect because computers don't fuck up. And he was trying to get some of that sort of humaneness baked into the algorithm, which is sort of an N interesting approach and also, maybe a smart one if you're doing a follow up to fidenza to kind of lean into that imperfectness

Roy:

huh? Yeah, I mean, I haven't.

Jamie:

It looks like none. None have traded on the secondary and the floors 96 and a half ether right now. So it'll be interesting to see, you know if and when they start moving and what the prices will be.

Roy:

Yeah. I mean, III do have to imagine that just a lot of these are just in the most diamond of Wally hands, like for sure. Very few people would have bought and held the Trojan to flip I think. Yeah, perhaps couple did the. Yeah, a couple did. Mr. Pineapple. I see. holds some. I see Roy, hold some alt state machine. Genesis boxes. You guys have mentioned flop world in Two Bored Apes but not ASM altered state machine. Could you share your views, if any on the project? I feel it takes all these slash your boxes for an NFT project should be so I'm curious on your views. Thanks.

Jamie:

I like these questions where they go, Oh, Roy has this NFT I noticed what what are your thoughts on it? And it's a product that I know of nothing about? I did I get to just kick back and listen to the answer.

Roy:

So you don't know anything about the project?

Jamie:

I'm not I mean, not based just on the name again. Maybe if I looked at it, I would go yeah, those

Roy:

maybe? I don't think some of them probably

Jamie:

not though. Yeah. I barely know about football. Yeah,

Roy:

I I'm actually not that familiar with the project. I I found out about it. Because one of our mutual friends who's fairly into fluff world. Just said in a group chat, hey, if you have any fluffs you can apply to get on the whitelist. Or make one of these for free or remember exactly how it worked. But then this was just the I guess this project. Well, this team works closely with the fluff World Team with the same team. I'm not, not entirely sure. And anyway, these things are what they sold were these these boxes, called it's called ASM AI FA Genesis, but it's basically an artificial intelligence. Like old stars, like a, I guess, artificial intelligence, Football Association NFA. And so within each box, you

Jamie:

have no idea what you're saying right now.

Roy:

I barely do. Alright, so the project is you get a box, which you can unbox.

Jamie:

And there's an artificial intelligence fantasy football team inside Whoa, yeah. So you know, you

Roy:

you get a brain. And you get I think, like five characters, like actual, you know, varying. There's football players that you can use in this game that's gonna come out. It's sounds like I'm making this up. I wish I knew more about it.

Jamie:

Are they real football players? Or?

Roy:

No, don't be ridiculous. What? Why? I said no, Jaime, don't be ridiculous.

Jamie:

I don't know. I think there's some fantasy sports projects that actually are interacting with the actual

Roy:

Oh, no, I thought you were saying real human beings being born, like created on the blog manifest in real life in front of me. My Computer.

Jamie:

Sure did not mean that. Yeah. Are they on with you right now?

Roy:

I think that they're all fictitious characters. Oh, yeah. I'm looking at now. They're like, they're not human. They're just constantly Stram Yeah, something like that. And yeah, what's the question? Um, could you share you share your

Jamie:

views on this project that you don't seem to know very well?

Roy:

Yeah. No, I mean, I It seems cool. It's different. It's interesting. It's innovative. It's got all that for it. It's related

Jamie:

to fluff world just in that fluff world people were able to mint it for free or something or is it like the same team? Or do you not know any of that?

Roy:

I don't know. I think there's a closer relationship than just a Europe of fluff. You can meet this but I don't know what it is specifically. Um, yeah, I mean, I have good things to say about it. Because it's interesting and a lot of other people I know and respect also you have good things to say about it. I hold I think nine of the boxes I haven't unboxed them yet. I think I should because I think the brain there's some AirDrop for Toke. There's so many things in this space to keep up with. It's stupid. I don't know. I I'm a fan. Let's put it that way. I like the project. It does tickle a lot of the right boxes for me, despite me doing a terrible job of explaining the whole thing. I have good vibes about it. Let's leave it with that.

Jamie:

Okey doke. Okey doke, che James Albertelli, he says, Where do you see all these online slash discord communities in two to three years?

Roy:

In the metaverse, probably?

Jamie:

I think we'll probably see a lot of them fade away. And a lot of them gets stronger. Yeah. I wonder if they're asking about that? Or if they specifically actually mean like, what tech platforms? Will they be communicating on? Will it still be on Twitter? Will it still be on Discord or not? That is very difficult to know. I wouldn't be surprised if we see some, like, thoroughly. Web three native, I mean, two to three years is a long time. So I wouldn't be surprised if we see something that's much more native to the space as a place for people. Place for the communities to really coalesce around and, and communicate and interact, you know, something that almost combines what we're getting out of Twitter, and discord and open see kind of all in one place.

Roy:

Yeah, no, I agree with that, like both sides that some of the communities are going to be very just strong, and you know, probably larger in size, and all that kind of stuff. And many will probably just disappear or like, yeah, like there'll be aspects of it that just split up and go into all the communities and like, Oh, hey, you should be part of the the laser line community. Now we're in this other one, but

Jamie:

a lot of that for sure. Yeah. We're people kind of believe in a project, but it just sadly fizzles out and and that community, or what remains of it will we'll find something else that they kind of like and get into it together.

Roy:

Huh? Yep. For sure. Oh, the second part of the question.

Jamie:

It basically kind of just says what we said, though, about some of them selling out in a bear market. Yeah. Which definitely will happen for some

Roy:

buying the top says, curious about your thoughts on LaunchPad platforms other than art blocks, for example, doodle labs, genetic chain Gen dot art. Do you see these and similar projects being important in bringing new artists into the space? Sounds specifically like we're talking about generative art here. Oh, yeah. Yeah.

Jamie:

FXhash is another one that's getting popular. Yeah, and I mentioned, but I think they are definitely important. And they will be important specifically, to bring new artists into the space, but also new collectors. I think I think it's pretty great. You know, if you kind of look at the price point for art blocks, and the prestige of it, I think the price point is tough for a lot of new collectors that are just trying to dabble. And, you know, if you're, if you're a generative artists, and it's a new thing to you, and you're not extremely confident, and you want to put some of your stuff out there, it's great to have options, where you're not going to, you know, the most prestigious house of generative art with your first ever project that you're kind of just getting your feet wet with. I think it's, it's pretty excellent to have other options for that.

Roy:

Yeah. And it's also like, just competition is good thing. Like, it's, you know, as much as I personally love our blocks, I think it's very good and healthy to have competition out there to sort of challenge them to make them up their game if they want to, you know, remain relevant and not get just overcome by by some other generative art platform. And it's also like the the space is so new that it's it's good to see different projects, trying different things like Gen art has like a membership model, where if you buy I think genetic chain does as well. If you buy the membership token, then I think you get first access that drops or something like that. Um,

Jamie:

yeah, I mean, like, we're trying to build sort of this, again, this decentralized thing. And so if we were in a world where if you wanted to produce market by generative art, and the only option was art blocks, that that would mean we've sort of failed as a decentralized thing, because to me, the whole point of decentralization is that you can just always go around any anybody or any collective whose behavior you're not into, so somebody doesn't like the way art blocks, switch to judge auctions or whatever. It's, it's to me important that they have other options for getting generative art. So yeah, it's definitely good to just have all sorts of options. And I think generative art is amazing. And so it's just good to see more of it sprouting up and more places for it to be incubated.

Roy:

Yep. agree with all that.

Jamie:

WillJames says, can you talk about how you formed a research strategy slash investment focus when you're getting started?

Roy:

I did not. I don't think I didn't like consciously think of an investment strategy. Sorry, yeah, an investment focus or reach out strategy. Did you?

Jamie:

know I mean, we've sort of touched upon this kind of thing before as far as what we used to look at. But honestly, when we started, it seemed like there was so little out there. And the people that were interested in the space were so excited and and paying so much attention that they would just sort of buy everything. I mean, it seems like honestly, your strategy was two min, everything that came up. And my mind was like two min, everything that came up that the art was not terrible to me. And that had a lot of people in the discord. So I was like, a little bit more selective. But other than that, we were, we were kind of just aping into stuff.

Roy:

Yeah, that's, that's kind of it. I think, when I first got into this space, I didn't even know how to find projects. And that was difficult. And then I bought a few of the first round and things I found and just didn't go very well. And then, you know, the first month or two was a little tricky. But then I think once the market started just getting a little bit bullish, and it seemed like, Hey, you could mean something. And then generally, quite quickly, flip it. I think it was around the time of like, the god of cats and the Bonds eyes, that it really started kicking off for me. And that was when, yeah, it basically did seem like it was the golden days were for seemingly months, maybe three to five months, almost anything hyped if you could mint, you could flip for like 2,3,4,5,6,7,8,10x very quickly. The good old days. So yeah, and your

Jamie:

main demand was just flat out bigger than supply at the time. And so your strategy at the time, was just to acquire stuff if you could at mint price, and it worked out. Yeah, it was very much a right place, right time situation.

Roy:

Yeah, like we'd get three projects a week. Now we get 30 a day. And the market was saying, Hold on three projects. 3 10K projects. We that's too many. No, no, that this is silly. Yeah. Yeah.

Jamie:

It was interesting how it kept ever every week and a half, we'd go wow, this seems like the peak. How can we possibly Yeah. And then I guess to some extent, we were right, because a lot of that very, a lot of that stuff has come way back down to earth and newer projects have had trouble selling out and stuff. Um, there's sort of a second part of this question. It says I research play to earn right now. But there are so many projects launching, it can be hard to find signal. I think that's, that's sort of a big problem. I guess I would say probably, what you want to do, if you are feeling that there's so many projects is come up with ways to write off projects, your goal shouldn't be defined? Why you want to invest in a project, in my mind, it should be why should I not buy this project. And that way, you can kind of just you have this giant pile of projects to look through, try to find what reasons to be dismissive of them as fast as possible. And that'll let you get through more. And then when you find one that you actually aren't finding something wrong with you know that you have something that's more interesting that you can dig deeper in. Yeah. And, uh, Warren Buffett sort of talks about that a lot when he's just research because there's many, you know, you think there's a lot of NFT projects, there's many, many, many more publicly traded companies out there. So for somebody who's possible investment universes, all of the publicly traded companies in the world, you know, his strategy is to just roll stuff out. Go, I don't understand it. It's done. I don't trust the management team. It's done and you just, you just move on.

Roy:

Yeah. Seems like a smart approach. It seems good and smart to be focusing on a niche already, like play their own games, but that they really is just a ton of those. themselves and

Jamie:

it's also like, you know, it sort of depends on are you trying to find the project and and buy your one or two or three NFT's? Or you know, if not, you can kind of do what I said about getting rid of projects and then you go okay, here's the 12 projects that are play to earn that made it through my filters, and you just kind of grab a couple four pieces of each and and hope for the best. And try to kind of follow along and maybe dump the ones that you lose faith in and double down on the ones that you're growing. More confident in. But it kind of depends on how scattered you want your positions to be, versus how concentrated you want them to be. Alright,

Roy: BKNYC:

What are some of the cooler Bored Ape Yatch Club physical goods or merch you've seen outside of the official eBay see much. I know there are some clothing projects like where ApeSthetics and the hundreds prospered the border of your club collab, but was curious if you have any favorites that you've come across. You've spoken about h h statics before

Jamie:

I have because I think it's a cool project. I don't specifically own any of it and haven't specifically but like a lot of what they do is they'll do a drop for like the DMT gang or the cheetah gang and stuff like that. And they haven't done like if they if they did something that was about tollgates I will be very liable to get in. But anyway, I haven't really seen all of that much outside of the specific ones that they mentioned. I did actually just today, though, I think it was on Etsy or Zazzle or something like that, where I was trying to make some Christmas ornaments and saw a bunch of what I can only assume is what's the word I'm looking for unofficial. But also like ones where they're using the logo and they don't have the rights to or just picking somebody somebody is nice ape and just doing stuff like that. But those were all kind of very simple ones where they're kind of just copying and pasting and trying to recreate the official hoodies and stuff like that, which is quite different from like where obstetrics where they're, they're trying to do interesting, unique goods and also have the rights to be doing but like I made a t shirt of just my ape I think individual holders doing individual stuff like that is is pretty cool. And you can kind of do some nice stuff like that but I haven't seen a lot of things out that are you know of the caliber and sophistication of web settings and the hundreds aside from them specifically I don't I don't think there is any yet.

Roy:

Yeah, I'm not familiar with any that I'm I'm not even that familiar with ape statics or the hundreds like it's I just haven't delved into the merch, much outside of the official stuff, which I've ordered. And I've basically been wearing this hoodie for like, two weeks. It's it needs to wash.

Jamie:

My immune stuff is on the way. I'm excited.

Roy:

I'm excited for it. Yeah, actually, I'm actually wearing a Bored Ape shirt and a hoodie. Yeah, fully decked out. Um, all right. Next question.

Jamie:

C squared says, what would it take for another chain with less barriers to entry like Tezos, etc to take off and become more mainstream? Do you think it'll naturally happen as NFT's become more widely adopted? Or will everyone naturally move to eth because it's so established comparatively? When they say less barriers to entry, like Tezos, I guess there, it sounds like they're just talking about gas because as far as the wallets and acquiring the currency, it doesn't seem like there's less barriers at all. It's it seems the same.

Roy:

If anything like a little more because there's less educational information and yeah, the marketplaces and the infrastructure on tasers, specifically even salon is not as established as a theorem. But yeah, gas is definitely a lot lower, which is a huge bag.

Jamie:

Do you think it will sort of happen naturally, and I think that is what's happened with tasers is that, you know, naturally people have migrated over there to use it for the use cases that it is better than Etherium at you know what I mean? Buying and selling low value art is is a smarter idea on Tezos than it is on Ethereum. And so people that are trying to do that have have gravitated, they're slowly I just think, you know, I'm such a believer in Aetherium and the various scaling solutions that people are working on I wonder how much how possible it'll be that it kind of is able to just swallow up all the demand and use cases with with all the possibilities, because for instance, you know, that is what I was just talking about is happening on tasers, but it very well could have happened on Polygon. But it just sort of so happens to have not happened there. But in terms of being able to transact quickly and freely, I think I feel like polygon is is everybody's good as tasers for that. Yeah.

Roy:

To go back to part of the question, what will it take become more mainstream? I mean, I think it is kind of already happening like Ubisoft, triple A gaming title. They're, they're launching on Tezos, because of the lower gas and the environmental impacts. So it is sort of already happening. And it will probably continue to happen with with Tezos, with Solana, with Avalanche with probably gone and immutable X. And I think that all of these lower gas options will be explored. But yeah, again, I think if slash when Ethereum does succeed in these long term scaling solutions, we may just see it all just come back to a theorem, you know, people bridge their assets over and all the best infrastructure may be on Etherium. And it could just consume everything. Maybe it doesn't maybe we live with, you know, a couple of chains that that work in cohabitation, like Slotta might just always be better at fast transactions and for gaming, NFT's Maybe Solana will always be the best. But I was reading

Jamie:

some pretty good Solana Fudd on Twitter the other day, I'm not sure how much I'm gonna believe in them long term, based on what I was reading

Roy:

about them. Yeah, really? Well, do you remember what specifically it was

Jamie:

something about how the way the proof of history algorithm works, makes the blocks more predictable and sort of therefore more able to be censored or DDoS? Basically, some something to that effect? I don't remember it too, specifically. But it's it sounded like they knew what they were talking about to me. Yeah, I do think that we're going to have a pretty Darwinian situation going on, where, you know, people just kind of become aware of their options. And projects are aware of their options, collectors, artists, just all all of the all of the participants that are there and that are coming are going to try stuff out. And they're going to talk to other people that have tried stuff out, and the money and the activity, and all of that is going to kind of flow to where it works best. And the protocols that are most well suited for stuff and build out the best are going to succeed at what they're best for. I do think it'll be very what's what is the word when, you know, people get promoted for correct reason? They refer to like society as Igallaterian

Roy:

Yes, yes.

Jamie:

I think it's going to be like that. Yeah. Yeah, I agree with that.

Roy:

AmoChu say he

Jamie:

Igalaterian I don't think actually is Yeah, I

Roy:

don't think it is either.

Jamie:

I just I just looked up the definition. That's not what I was looking. Yeah.

Roy:

It's not not utilitarian. It's not it's I know exactly what it is. But I don't know it.

Jamie:

Um, this is so fun.

Roy:

Great. Podcasting. A, the the word where when you're good at something. Those who deserve to be promoted. Ah,

Jamie:

meritocracy. Yes. Nailed it. Oh, exhilarating. Yeah,

Roy:

we hope you enjoyed that.

Jamie:

Yeah, yeah. No, but I do think that we're gonna see Yeah, a process that's very much

Roy:

a igualiterian even making it that that basically

Jamie:

just means that you think everybody should be equal. Okay? Regardless of you know, race, creed, gender, religion, blah blah blah. Yeah. Terrible idea.

Roy:

Just the way you were like bla bla bla bla bla alright. Amo true says recap on pixel vault out of this a staking punks coming number two drop in retrospect was the number two sellout inevitable. How should Pixel vault address the upcoming special edition sale? Given that foundersDAO planetDAO and public all want in?

Jamie:

I barely know any of this I have I own zero pixel vault nfts for my whole life and I probably always will I kind of knew what was going on when it was literally just a punks comic and it was like okay, burn or yeah and it has gotten considerably more complicated since then. So I'm yeah, I'm way out of my depth here. Yeah.

Roy:

All right to answer the the punks comic two sell out inevitable Yes, I think it was sort of inevitable that it was just going to basically what happened was they had 10,000 addition to comics price was point one, which is less than the first comic and I think that they said that for like the first hour a certain subset of the community could mint and the second hour it was another subset and then the third hour was public and it just sold out within like, I don't know 12 seconds or three minutes or something crazy in this huge gas will and like 700 wallets got all 10k So like that and then they just flipped it on secondary and

Jamie:

and some people were supposed to have early access but didn't

Roy:

know I don't know the specifics, but people were unhappy. But yes, punks comics like they minted out of point two, and they've probably delivered. I don't know 28th of value to holders over over the course between the founders Dow the the mid pass the meta heroes, the planets, the sidekicks, the

Jamie:

everything has just got you the meta here. All right. That's what it was.

Roy:

Yeah, yeah. Yeah.

Jamie:

double counting, but yeah, regardless, but

Roy:

like you could have the I don't know. Yeah.

Jamie:

Probably less equivalent than other men passes because of all the nonsense you can do.

Roy:

Yes, yeah. And, yeah, so then they're like, Alright, we're gonna release edition two, and it's going to be cheaper than edition one. You have at it. Of course, like this. So many people have been what, like people have gotten to the space three months off of the punish comixlaunch like, Ah, I wish I could have mentioned that people that minted it were like, I wish I minted more. It's just like crazy to imagine that it wouldn't have just sold instantly at that price point. Yeah, but I think that was expected and inevitable. How should they address the upcoming special edition sale? I don't know what that is even so I can't really answer that.

Jamie:

I think it's the the ones that have the apes on the cover. Oh, yeah. Remember there was like, Yeah, you competed. You tried to get picked and you didn't know

Roy:

Yeah, yeah, boy.

Jamie:

When that yeah, you have a much better

Roy:

I think I had like 3000 Twitter followers then.

Jamie:

Oh my god. Yeah.

Roy:

I don't know how it affects my next question. Next

Jamie:

question. This is our last question. It is JXMJ XM says less a question or more of a request. Can you ask Jamie musings to pronounce and then in parentheses they put the letters e t h in that order correctly. And then they have the crying laughing emojis and said otherwise fantastic show guys. ETH. he There we go. We got a short hair. Easy. Yeah. Not "f" right. Although as just does fall right out of my mouth very naturally. I had to pause there and

Roy:

think about Yeah, I'm sure it will again, but

Jamie:

and you fucked up Adidas real good a minute ago. We had somebody that first Sandy we're gonna not listen to them anymore because of how badly you said it. It's not Adidas. It's it is absolutely Adidas.

Roy:

I in my head I I've been like with Nike. I've been like, wanting to say like a couple times, which that's crazy. It is crazy. I've never said that before, but for some reason my brains like oh, maybe it's Nike, I was like, it's not like but Nike Adidas. And that's been episode 22 of Two Bored Apes. Twitter Q&A!

Jamie:

Twitter Q&A! Thanks for listening. Bye.

Intro:

Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh Two Bored Apes, talking NFT's, De-fi, and some random stuff! uh uh uh uh